Could/Would you drift the Yakima in a canoe?

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by swc7916, Apr 26, 2007.

  1. swc7916

    swc7916 New Member

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    It's a Chippewean 16. This model hasn't been made for years - I bought it at least 20 years ago. It's made of what was then called Oltanar and is now called Royalex; which is an ABS/Foam/ABS laminate. Many canoes have a raised strip down the center that aids in tracking, but this one has a smooth bottom and is difficult to paddle straight, especially when the wind is blowing. However, it is very manuverable and the product literature from the time it was purchased shows it running whitewater.
     
  2. AFJBugger

    AFJBugger New Member

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    You can do it! I would recommend getting drunk firstptyd , while attending summer school in Pullman I went to fish the Yakima when I realized there was a massive rubber hatch. I figured if you can’t beat them join them. I proceeded to get wasted and floated half of the canyon in water-wings and then did the remainder in a canoe.

    That being said my buddy keeps talking about doing it in his canoe as he does not have a pontoon and I am not too sure about making the commitment. We both know a ‘few’ technical strokes but I am sticking with my gut.

    Apparently, turning 27 has turned me into a real puss!

    If you have some paddling experience and the right gear you should be fine, otherwise hit the classifieds and buy a used pontoon.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Be Jofus G

    Be Jofus G Banned or Parked

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    Hmm, don't really know that canoe. Stabilizers will probably help you out with the tracking though. They're pretty simple to fabricate, with some plastic pipe and foam.
     
  4. David Loy

    David Loy Senior Moment

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    Sure, why not. I'd borrow a future ex-friends boat. Pick a warm day with reasonable flow, wear PFDs, not do a technical portion, bring nothing but lunch. Whats going to happen, you go swimming? Only after a couple runs getting comfortable in the canoe, would I bring fly gear.
    I too noted the canoe work on the Wulff vid. Pretty cool.
    I have no notion of being an expert canoeist. I did own a white water racing canoe for a few years though. What a tippy sumbioch this boat was. 18.5 feet long, kevlar, and a perfectly round cross section with no keel strip. Was talked into buying it, what a mistake. Was really fast on a lake but I'd never do a river in it. Even the slightest body movement translated into some hull action. I just mention this to point out that saying "use a white water canoe" has two connotations. You don't want a WW racing boat for sure.
     
  5. The down side is you might die!
    Frank.
    Don't do it.
    .02
     
  6. David Loy

    David Loy Senior Moment

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    Well, the indians have been using them for a while.
     
  7. D3Smartie

    D3Smartie Active Member

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    I have done the yak in a canoe and it was not a big deal. If you can handle a canoe in moving water, go for it. If it is just to get from A-B to wade, it is a great way to go. Any river can be dangerous in any boat, but the Yak is not a very bad river in the canyon.
    I'd do it.
     
  8. Salmo_g

    Salmo_g Active Member

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    I've floated many NW rivers in my canoes over the years for the purpose of fishing. I've known no watercraft as versatile as canoes. I only floated the Yakima in it once, tho, and that was in 1975. At medium to lower flows, a river canoe is a good choice. Since your canoe is made of royalex and has no keel, it's probably suitable for floating the Yakima. The fact that you asked here causes me to wonder if you're well suited to canoeing the Yakima or any river at this time. If you're an experienced river canoeist, then no problem, if not, maybe more experience would be a good idea. Are you comfortable standing to fly fish out of your canoe? Are you, or would you be, comfortable standing in your canoe while drifting down the river to look at what's up ahead? If not, I think you should stick to stillwater until you're more attuned to moving around and standing in your canoe. Then you become part of the stability of the craft in the water, and that's a good thing for river canoeing.

    Sincerely,

    Salmo g.
     
  9. Rocket Red

    Rocket Red Vegetarian Cannibal

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    When I was in college, some of my friends were at CWU. I floated it on an inflatable alligator.

    The rubber hatch was in full swing.

    But it was in the middle of summer, and I was wearing a swimsuit, not waders. I did not catch anything on that trip, and by 'anything' I mean STDs.

    So I think with low flows, a cheap canoe and a willingness to get soaked. . .
     
  10. martyg

    martyg Active Member

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    Hey man. The Canyon at normal flows is total Class I -, but is does have some strong eddie lines that you have to pay attention to.

    From your comment about paddling in a straight line I'd suggest getting in a clinic before you tackle this. There are some decent open boat folks in the area. Contact the ACA at 703-451-0141 for a list of certified instructors. Get your boat handling skills down and some clue as to how to swim in moving water. Note that keels are quick fixes for poor hull design - either in performance or construction - and has little to do with anything else. I can't think of any purpose built boat - whitewater or flatwater - that uses a keel.

    Your boat sounds like it will be just fine. That section hardly requires a whitewater specific boat - but like any body of water it requires some knowledge and skill.
     
  11. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    I think it'd be fine in the summer when the water is warm and lowish, wear a life jacket and wet wade, you be fine
     
  12. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson Yakbowbw

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    Sorry to change the subject, but I remember that Sunday.... I was sipping a bloody mary looking at Lake Chelan. My mother, God rest her soul, came out of church in Selah and thought the world had just come to an end. There was dirt falling from the sky. What a mes!

    Yes, I have done the canyon in a canoe, it was not hard at all, but we knew what we were doing, and paid attention to the river.
     
  13. Canoe Rider

    Canoe Rider Member

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    Bring a long line (30 ft or so) and tie it to the stern. Then whenever you come to rapids or a section you are uncomfortable with just get out on the shore, grab the line, let the canoe float ahead and carefully "walk" it through the section in question.

    It's how I did the John Day for a multi-day camping trip on a canoe with a lot of gear. Great way to get around the Class III water.
     
  14. Josh Benjamin

    Josh Benjamin Member

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    this is the reply i got from my dad...

    most canoes handle class 1 and 2 water. what is it made of ? is it a composite
    or fiberglass ? a
    aluminum boat is ok in whitewater. they dent unless they are really slammed.

    look at the canoe. if it has a real rounded bottom it may not do well in faster
    water. get in it
    while its in the water. if you get nervous getting in the boat worrying about
    dumping it over
    thats a good sign. canoes either have good initial stability or poor initial
    stability and usually
    the reverse is true for secondary stability. a good initial stability canoe will
    probably have
    poor secondary stability and that means its a flatwater canoe. for whitewater
    you want good
    secondary stability.

    you can see in the sides of the boat the secondary stability built right in. a
    boat with a sort
    of a Ved bottom will show pronounced sides which promote staying up in confused
    water and when the
    boat is sliding around in the current.

    bigger boats are usually a compromise between flatwater and whitewater. measure
    the length.

    thats all i can say.