cutthroat boats

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by hendersonbaylocal, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. Milt Roe

    Milt Roe Active Member

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    Frank - I know there are plans for cross-planked flat bottom skiffs on the net - Sounds like HBL's boat is like those. Really nice boats. I never looked around for plans because I had my mind made up that I wanted to copy the Mojean skiff my Dad's friend had. It was made locally, was the traditinal fishing skiff for cutthroat in Puget Sound, and I had a connection to it from rowing that same kind of boat as a kid. It was easy to take the lines from the old boat and make a copy. Plus I could look at the details of the construction from the original boat when I wondered how they did something.
     
  2. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    A few more photos. Started stripping paint, so she looks pretty ugly at the moment.

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  3. Milt Roe

    Milt Roe Active Member

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    Sweet! The caps on the gunwale and bow would sure look nice stripped down and varnished...Is that what you are thinking too?

    Any idea what kind of wood the planks are? Who made the boat? How old?

    Looks like she was built for outboard power, and I agree with Bob that if you decide to add oarlocks it would be best if they were not set up on blocks. If the height is right, setting a nice brass receiver for the oars into the gunwale would minimize changing the original design and keep everything out of the way of your casting when you aren't on the sticks.

    Looking forward to tracking your progress. Beautiful boat.
     
  4. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    She was built in the late 80s by a maritime museum back east. The owner I purchased her from called it a Chesapeake Bay Oyster Skiff. The frames and some of the other structure is oak. I think the planking is some sort of cedar, but I'm not sure. I'll try to get a photo of the planks as I was wondering about what it is. I'm not the best at identifying non local woods.

    I was thinking about varnishing the gunwales until I got into stripping paint and found that there is a pretty bad looking scarf joint where they used a bunch of epoxy to bridge a big gap. The gunwales look like they are the same wood as the hull planking. The caps (outwales?) are oak.

    She was definitely built for outboard power. I don't plan on rowing her much except for positioning on a drift or sneaking up on a school of silvers. I've already purchased some nice flush mount brass oarlocks and my plan was to see if I could get them to work without adding risers. With the height and shape of the rails I think it will.
     
  5. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    More progress... nearly done stripping paint. Getting ready to remove some bad wood and scarf in new stuff in a couple minor places, then prep and paint.
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  6. Mark Moore

    Mark Moore Just a Member

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    Definitely appropriate work for a person of youth and vigor...great motivation for a college education.:ray1:
     
  7. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!

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    "Adjustability" may be as simple as installing several oarlock holes for a range of options. Seen it done many times. Once you find an average optimum location you can also drill out holes fore and aft of that location as needed. It could give you an option for standing rowing, kneeling rowing, or turning around to row seated on the thwarts in the other direction. many old time rowboat men would have a plank handy to place across the rails athwartship and then they could slide that anywhere along the length of the boat to row from where they wanted to. A very handy feature when you have aload aboard, people or cargo etc.

    I would suggest a great book on all of this: "Boats, Oars and Rowing" by the late Captain Pete Culler. It is excellent. Also see the new compilation of his work called "Pete Culler on Boats"
    Captn Pete was a traditionalist, but if you pay attention you will see how this was all based on simplicity and functionaltiy. The old ways really do work.
     
  8. Zissou Intern

    Zissou Intern Member

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    Ryan, what a great project you have undertaken. You'll be earning a many kharma points for the upgrades and refit of this craft.

    Milt, your boat is a beauty!

    Bob, I think I still owe you lunch and you owe me a casting lesson.

    -Keith
     
  9. Bob Triggs

    Bob Triggs Stop Killing Wild Steelhead!

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    Where the hell have you been???!!!!
     
  10. Tod Fossetta

    Tod Fossetta Sorry, I'm not set up for that.

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    BEAUTIFUL! There's nothing like classic lines and good wood to bring a certain feel to your piscatorial pursuits.
     
  11. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    In the midst of stripping the hull. The bottom planks are actually in pretty good shape.
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  12. Milt Roe

    Milt Roe Active Member

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    Cool how they lay up the grain opposite like that on the bottom planks. Must make the wood swell together better. I wonder why the cross-planked bottom came to be so common - Must have been more work that way, but if so there must have been a good reason to do it that way.

    I have my eye on a fixer skiff. We'll see if I can get it from the curent owner - Strips bent around steamed oak, but she sits at high tide getting farther and farther from being fixable each day.

    Looking good - Keep the pics coming.
     
  13. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    Sounds like an interesting boat. It's strip planked?

    I heard that they lay the planks like that so if they cup at all, it's towards the chine, not away from it. On some good advice, I decided I'm gonna pull off all the planks and route a caulking seam onto the edges to I can caulk her with cotton and it should be dry (in theory) without having to let her swell up. We will see.
     
  14. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    Milt and HendersonBayLocal:

    I was wondering what size of motor you might intend to put on your boats? My second question, is how do you determine whether to use a long-shaft or short shaft motor? Do the cut-outs on the transom determine that you put a short-shaft on it...so to speak? Anyones help is appreciated.
     
  15. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    Larry,

    I don't think Milt has an outboard. Oar power only!

    I have an old 9.9 Nissan that came with the boat. I'll probably stick with that for now. It's a standard shaft. I'm no expert, but I think you basically just want the cavitation plate near level with the bottom of the boat.