Does any one fish out of a kayak?

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by 1morecast, Apr 11, 2007.

  1. polepole

    polepole New Member

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    Lot's of good opinions here that I'm not meaning to debate. Just adding perspective ...

    "Fast" is a relative terms. The Scrambler is actually known as a slower boat. If you think it is fast, you should try a Prowler or a Tarpon 160. Those are known as fast SOTs. Although they are probably average speed when compared to most SIK.

    Not sure why this would be. In both SOT and SIK you need to dress appropriately for the conditions. On the salt water this means you need to be prepared to enter the water. I gear up pretty much the same whether I'm in a SIK or SOT.

    -Allen
     
  2. martyg

    martyg Active Member

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    I'd just like to establish that none of these boats are fast. They simply are not made for that use. One hull design may be more effecient that another, but within hull lengths you are splitting hairs that don't deserve to be split. Once you settle in on a length then start to look at features that will make your fishing day more enjoyable.

    What a longer and more efficient boat will buy you is more comfort. A longer boat is more stable, it handles waves better, and it will allow you to cover more ground more effeciently, and if you ever want to do an overnighter iy will carry gear.

    SOTs and boats with cockpits both have advantages / disadvantages. With a SOT you will be exposed to the elements, but you have a higher relative degree of safety over a rec sit-in boat. It you should capsize in a rec sit in boat you are pretty much screwed unless you can get to shore. There is simply no elegent way to right that boat. With a SOT you simply climb back in. I also find that if I take a SOT out I am constantly jumping in and out to wade and fish, so I am aready dressed for slop & cold.

    Note that I have not talked about rolling. It is simply out of the realm of this discussion. You simply are not ready for combat rolls in a big salt environment until you properly execute a roll several hundred times - to both sides - in a benign environment. Having a hand roll to both sides is even better in case your paddle is tucked away while fighting a fish.

    Lastly, there has been a lot of focus on equipment. I would encourage anyone getting involved to take a day long clinic from an ACA or BCU certified instructor. The forward stroke is going to be the hardest thing that you will ever learn to execute efficiently. Might as well learn it correctly so your days are more enjoyable.
     
  3. Gary Thompson

    Gary Thompson dirty dog

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    The wife and I have a 18' canoe but we are going to get a 12 or 14' boat so we can stand up to cast and sight fish.
    We saw a two person kayak on the Dry Falls opener it looked cool, sit in, looked to be about 20' long
     
  4. Tom Arroll

    Tom Arroll Member

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    Hi Frank,

    I have fished from a variety of kayaks and have found that there are pros and cons to the different models, styles ect. I started out fishing from traditional Sit In Kayaks (SIK) which are usualy sea worthy and keep you dry. The down sides of SIKs is that your mobility in the boat is limited which is a pain when landing fish and trying to access gear. One other issue is that if you dump out of your boat it takes more skill and experience to bet back into the now water filled kayak. This is specialy dangerous of you are kayaking/fishing solo. Sit on top kayaks (SOT's) on the other hand don't fill up with water unless you forget to close a hatch or something and they are typicaly pretty easy to flop back into without assistance. Many of the contemporary plastic SOTs are very stable and are well set up for fishing. Some are so stable that you can sit side saddle and even stand on them. The big complaint about most of the plastic SOTs is that they are on the heavy side and slow. I have a light weight fiberglass and epoxy SOT called a Kazkasi Dorado which is designed for fishing. This boat is 16' and is a comprimize between stabilty and paddling speed. You should check out the Kayakfishingstuff website which has an active kayak fishing discussion board. There are many threads covering fishing kayak preferences. The Tarpon and Hobie boats seem to be quite popular.

    Thomas
     
  5. polepole

    polepole New Member

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    Speeds ... from personal experience I can paddle a "slow" SOT in the low 3 mph's for extended paddles. And I can paddle a "fast" SOT in the high 3 mph's for extended paddles. Just to give you an idea what speeds we're talking about.

    Tom, how are you liking that Dorado? I test paddled one last fall. Nice quick boat and I really like the "stiffness" of a non-plastic boat. The fit was a little tight on me though. Another more available (at least here in the USA) fiberglass/kevlar boat is the Current Designs Kestral 140. I've not tried one yet, but a guy I know is paddling one and he likes it well enough. I think you'll see more glass SOT yaks being introduced in the near future.

    -Allen
     
  6. billkendrick831@msn.com

    billkendrick831@msn.com Northsounder

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    I have to chime in one more time.I used to have a Dagger Caymen,compared to my necky sit-in it was a joy to fish out of.The increased mobility is alot better as long as your properly prepared as PolePole pointed out.Check out the kayak classifieds,I've seen more than a couple prowlers for sale in recent memory,scramblers are a dime a dozen too when it comes to sit-ons.
     
  7. House

    House New Member

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    My wife and I just got a pair of 2007 Hobie Outbacks, and took them fishing this weekend for the first time. They're great fishing platforms--we were fishing down on the South Sound. I found them to be super stable (I fished side saddle for a while too, and it was no problem), and the hands free locomotion meant I could cast while moving, or troll a fly behind me. Casting a fly rod from the kayak is going to take some getting used too, especially since I'm not an exceptionally skilled caster anyway. :D
    The hobies are sit on tops, but we stayed very dry. I took one out through the squall that came through late Sunday afternoon--winds above 20kts and chop of 3 feet or so. The Outback performed great, it rode over the steep stuff with no problem. I got some spray in the face of course, but I was dressed for cold water and actually had a lot of fun.

    The boats catch fish, too. We caught several hatchery coho in the 12" - 16" range. I also caught my first searun cutthroat of the year, a pretty 14" fish.
     
  8. 1morecast

    1morecast Active Member

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    Thx to all for their input!! In the past I have fished out of my 10' Outcast pontoon boat which wasn't too bad, as long as the wind stayed down. After watching a guy fishing out of a kayak he called the "big game model" { can't remember the mfgr.} His boat was loaded with a fish finder, rod holders, and plenty of storage for a day trip. I was amazed at how stabel this boat seemed to be in the water! And it looked fast to me, he was moving a lot faster, with less effort than I was. I am going to try and demo a couple of boats before i buy,and I am defintely going to take a kayak course.
     
  9. polepole

    polepole New Member

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    FYI. The Big Game is an Ocean Kayak model. In terms of speed, it is a slower boat. In terms of stability, it is one of the most stable boats.

    -Allen
     
  10. Tom Bowden

    Tom Bowden Active Member

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    The Hobie Outbacks look like great boats, but It seem to me that the pedal mechanism would rust out quickly without a lot of cleaning and maintenance. Does anyone have any experience with this?

    Tom
     
  11. polepole

    polepole New Member

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    I have not heard of the peddle mechanism having problems with rusting out. I have heard of some weakness issues in the hull where the drive mechanism sits, so if you're looking at a used boat (05 or earlier), make sure you check out that area for weakness and/or cracks. I've not heard about any issues with the 06 models, but they may be too new to exhibit the issues. Supposedly Hobie has fixed this in more recent models. For older models they'll also send you a fix kit free of charge. To their credit, Hobie supposedly takes these issue seriously and has great customer service when it comes to addressing them.

    -Allen
     
  12. House

    House New Member

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    In the documentation that came with our Hobies, they reccommended hosing the mirage drives down and then spraying the metal bits with WD40 if you have them in the salt. In the research we did prior to purchasing the boats I didn't come across any complaints of rusty drives.
     
  13. Tim Garton

    Tim Garton Member

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    Polepole... great to have you on the board. Thanks for all the input. I've always been a sit-in kayaker but after reading your posts and visiting your web link a SOT is a definite consideration. I especially like the stability of the SOT's you've mentioned since I like to take pics as well as fish. And, I can't afford a motor boat bawling:
     
  14. Dave Ellis

    Dave Ellis Member

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    I use the Ocean Kayak Big Game Prowler :thumb: - super stable - stand up and fish - lots of room and storage.
     
  15. Rich Schager

    Rich Schager You should have been here yesterday...

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    Hairwing,

    I'm also looking at buying a Ocean Kayak Big Game Prowler. My only concern at this point is speed / ease of paddling some longer distances. Any wisdom to share?