Duwamish Outlet = Boiling with Fish

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by JayB, Aug 31, 2009.

  1. KerryS

    KerryS Ignored Member

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    Can't be any worse then flyfishermen in pontoons herding them.:eek:

    You had to know I would bring it up again.......and again.........and again.;)
     
  2. JayB

    JayB Active Member

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    I think that most people would agree with you on those points, even if they also took a cast or two while passing through.

    FWIW once you leave the area near the bridge and get closer to Eliot Bay you can cast to much smaller schools of fish that pass through every few minutes, the overwhelming majority of which (if you're me) are more than happy to pass right by your fly without so much as a second glance.
     
  3. P.Dieter

    P.Dieter Just Another Bubba

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    I've been looking at some of these feelings, as I come from an Idaho trout fishing in the 60's and 70's experience. Which has a longer tradition? The fancy pants fly fishing sport who is fishing for the jollies of c&r or the guys lining the banks yanking out meat for the table? Is "sport" a higher pursuit than "harvest"? The modern day answers are complex and variable to specific resources to say the least.

    I think it's obvious that we all believe in a "clean kill" sporting tradition where how you harvest is important, but I think it's also unfair for us to characterize all the guys on that bridge as snaggers. If you actually go down there and hang out you will see A LOT of self policing in the group.

    One of the things I'm enjoying most about this run is the questions of limits (self imposed) and balance it forces us to examine and personally contend with.
     
  4. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Sox, I agree, except that I had a great year in unpouplated areas last year and this year I'm not touching many fish and landing even fewer. I guess that 5 y/o in your story would be outfishing me too!

    I think that there are always snaggers or those working the fringe of the legal practices. I also believe that Paul is on the money with a level of self policing, even in these crowded locations that seem too packed and chaotic for some of us.
     
  5. sox

    sox New Member

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    It's good to hear that there is some policing going among the people in those areas. As far as the sport vs. harvest discussion, I was just wondering why a fly fisherman would want to fish in that environment? (Since this is a fly fishing forum) If you are out simply for harvest, gear fishing in a place that sounds like the way to go. You almost assure yourself the limit. By the way, I didn't, in anyway, try to imply that everyone there is a "snagger". I would assume that most people who fly fish however are looking for something more. Flat out, it's a more difficult way to catch a fish. Hence the sport aspect of fly fishing. Again, maybe it's just me. I would rather not fish than fish there. Maybe that makes me one of those "fancy pants" fly fishermen.

    Mumbles, sorry to read about your fishing woes this year. All I can offer up I guess is to keep casting. And keep looking for the remote/ less used beaches. Even if the fishing is slower, you'll probably enjoy yourself more and keep those beaches in mind for the winter months when you're hunting rezzies and SRC. There is some great beaches around where I've caught 10+ pink / coho in a day and fished completely by myself. Most of them are pretty streaky and hit and miss but I'll gladly trade the days of few or no fish for the knowledge of places I can fish by myself. Remember, if nobody is fishing them now when the salmon are coming through you can be sure no one will be there in the winter.
     
  6. P.Dieter

    P.Dieter Just Another Bubba

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    sox, there is nothing personal in my post except maybe to myself for my own contemplation. I do think there's a lot of room between "simply out for harvest" and "fishing for sport". My post is about finding a balance in all this, and balance requires nuance.

    Nuance on WFF is probably scarcer than a pre 1996 Green River Pink.
     
  7. Big E

    Big E Active Member

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    There was a short report on Channel 4....OMG! And here I thought PNP was bad.
     
  8. slugthug

    slugthug Member

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    :confused: Is PnP = Picnic Point????? You guys are not talking about transistors are you?
     
  9. herl

    herl Member

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    pnp = point no point,

    and ldr = long distance release; that one took me awhile.

    Eric
     
  10. Mayfly Aviator

    Mayfly Aviator Active Member

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    Drove by the Duwamish on the way to W Seattle on 599. Going 60 and I saw over a half-dozen fish jump 2' out of the water. A lot of gear chuckers on the bank, but I'm sure that there's room for a backcast on river left. Ride your bike on the trail through there and I'm sure you could find some great corners with ample room for a cast. Most gearheads won't go down that far unless their cooler has wheels.
     
  11. Finspot

    Finspot Member

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    I'm going to disagree with a few of the comments about fly-fishing's relationship to "beauty" or "solitude" or "scenery." First of all, there's no reason to assume that a flyfisher is inherently more predisposed to the mythologizing of A River Runs Through It et al. This is insulting to the flyfisher. Flyfishing is a means to catch fish, and while we can study the relevant socioeconomic data and come to some conclusions about education, income, etc, I'm guessing the bottom line has more to do with where the fish are at. For us urban folks in Seattle, the fish are at the Duwamish. Whether stacked up at a natural barrier in a pristine canyon or in a channelized shipping lane, anglers will take advantage of such quirks in a run. To say it's unsporting strikes me as somewhat dishonest. Is it unsporting to fish for huge rainbows and browns stacked up below a tailwater? Lastly, while I deplore the sort of environmental havoc visited upon Seattle's waterway in the last century, it also has its own peculiar beauty, part of which is wrapped up in the democratic nature of the fishery: newly arrived immigrants lining the riprap, Boeing workers on lunchbreak, high-tech zillionaires whiizzing by on yachts. And the scenery: barges, trash compactors, cranes, container ships. It's a crazy 21st century scene. I've fished it for the past week and enjoyed myself immensely. I also enjoyed my float through the Black Canyon of the Gunnison this summer, a trip that is quite simply out of reach for most.
     
  12. yellowlab

    yellowlab Active Member

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    But I'd have to say, that fishing the Pinks amongst the shipping channels is far better better than Brown lining for Carp below a sewage treatment plant. Not that Im a snob, but its one of those things that I'll probably pass on. There was an article about fishing for Stripers below the effluent of the nuclear power plant on the eastcoast. The warm water draws in the bait, and thus brings in the Stripers. Its something that I'd like to try, as I've heard those Stripers are something to be had on the fly.
     
  13. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    Sox -
    Regarding your quote -

    "Second, does anyone else feel like fishing in a place like that where it's just stacked up, standing (or floating) alongside a million of other people kind of takes the "sport" out of it? Maybe it's just me, but where is the fun in that? There certainly can't be much of a sense of accomplishment in being able to catch fish there. You could probably give fly rod to a 5 year old who has never even held one before and he could land a few."

    Not sure that I agree however if we are going down that path let's do so uniformally and include such fisheries as Point No Point, Dash point, Port Susan, Whidbey Island beaches, Hood Canal or any of the Puget Sound rivers with decent runs of salmon during salmon season, the Grande Rhonde and Methow rivers during the big push of hatchery steelhead, virtually all the trout lake fishing in the State (artifically enhanced with hatchery fish), etc. Each of these fisheries attracted numbers of fishers that may detract from other's enjoyment and many are enhanced with hatchery production.

    If the folks fishing in these locations are having a good time, following the rules and generally respecting the resource why isn't that "sport"? I agree that while such situations may not be your or my cup of tea I try hard not to look down my nose at those that are findng enjoyment in their "sport". Heck who knows some of the next generation of fly fishers may well be enjoying such fisheries now.

    A balancing view?

    Tight lines
    Curt
     
  14. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Well stated Curt! One never knows what someone else may be enjoying.

    As for me, once I get somewhere, get settled in, got my routine going and enjoying myself I am fishing alone no matter how many people are in the crowd. Sure there are some great places where I truly don't see another human at all. More often though, if fishing for salmon around here you will be in areas where there are a few to dozens of others on the same shore or in boats just off shore. To each his or her for their enjoyment.
     
  15. sox

    sox New Member

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    Sorry if I offended anyone with that post, but you’re right, that is definitely not my cup of tea. And my post is definitely opinionated. And you’re also right about the fisheries you listed. I don’t fish any of them. And I also try to spend as much time as I can fishing for native fish. It doesn’t mean I’m “looking down my nose at anyone. If you’re having fun doing it, then by all means, enjoy. I suppose I try to look for the challenge in fly fishing and I assumed that more people on here would be same way. I was simply commenting that the scene makes me think of a bunch of guys lined up at a fish hatchery tossing flies/ lures/ bait into the holding tanks. Haha. Not necessarily a challenge.