Eastside drift boat repair

Alex MacDonald

that's His Lordship, to you.....
#16
I've used the Z-Spar with good results. As you say, the deterioration was probably the result of being almost 800 miles to the South! Beautiful stuff once it's put on properly though. It looked like I could put my arm in the finish all the way up to my elbow! My tiller, which was covered when I didn't have a hand on it, DID last a very long time, but the crib boards, grab rails on the cabintop, and the rest of the exposed teak went quickly. Considering how much work there is in getting multiple coats on the wood, Oil's so much easier and it looks great! The next time around, I went for the oil!
 
#17
Well done, beautiful job.

Red oak is quite different in terms of rot than the white oak used on beetle cats, but you've got the basics: repair dings promptly, water entry is your enemy.

It makes me homesick for my old eastsider, but it went to wonderful people who hopefully will flat wear it out.
 

Joepa

Joe from PA
#18
Nice job. I’m in the middle of a restoration on a ’71 eastside drifter. The Ash on my boat was in much better shape but I decided to replace it with SA Mahogany anyway. I was able to bend the Mahogany to shape easily but haven’t put it on yet. Just sprayed the primer it this morning and hope to top coat it this weekend.
 
#19
Nice job. I’m in the middle of a restoration on a ’71 eastside drifter. The Ash on my boat was in much better shape but I decided to replace it with SA Mahogany anyway. I was able to bend the Mahogany to shape easily but haven’t put it on yet. Just sprayed the primer it this morning and hope to top coat it this weekend.
Yeah, this Mahogany should have made the bend, but sometimes you're unlucky and get wood with a flaw in the grain. I used to teach a skiff building class. We used Mahogany for the rails. We built a few hundred boats with no breakage but one poor guy ended up breaking about 5 rails one after the other.

Post some pics of you project.
 

Joepa

Joe from PA
#20
Ok, here's my boat photos. I seem to have lost the "before" photos. I got this boat a year ago in August. The condition was better than the other boat in this thread, but it had a terrible paint job (satin white exterior with crap brown slapped over all the wood and a peach interior). All the paint was faded and peeling off. Same thing for the trailer, I sanded and repainted that too (apparently yellow was a popular color in the 70's!).

I sanded it down to the fiberglass. The hull was in very good condition. I recoated the bottom with Coat-it and it applied swimmingly well with a squeegee (a tip from another site). 3-4 primer coats and then the top coats. Initially, I used pettit easypoxy in jade green but didn't really like the result, so I recoated it with gloss white (I have 2 qts of the jade green left if anyone wants it cheap).

A plug for the guys at Edensaw who hooked me up with the Mahogany. It was very affordable, cut to size, really easy to work, and looks great.
 

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Freestone

Not to be confused with freestoneangler
#22
Great job! Looks like a lot of work but worth it.

You might want to take the 'after' pics down though as if Jerry sees them, he might steal it from you, LOL!
 
#23
You might want to try Island boat shop in Port Townsend. It's a shop that specializes in classic fiberglass boats and does wood also. It's an easy project so you might also think about finding a student from the Northwest school of wooden boat building.

I do wood boat building and repair to wooden parts of glass boats, but I'm in Ellensburg. PM me if you think might want to haul it over here.
I have a very good friend who used the island bookshop in Port Townsend and has nothing but good things to say about them, as far as the woodwork go's you may want to hire a finish Carpenter, most carpenters have a lack of working in October November you probably can hire someone for $15-$20 an hour and get the same results

The way I see it as wood is wood whether it's on a boat or a house