Elwha River

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Olive bugger, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Been out of the picture for some time, but was wondering what was happening?

    Any updates?
     
  2. Es muy bueno
     
  3. Scott Salzer

    Scott Salzer previously micro brew

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    They just blew up the last of the Glines Canyon dam and will be removing the final debris.
     
  4. Ron McNeal

    Ron McNeal Life's good!

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    Last, and final blast was Tuesday. All that's left to do now is muck out the blast debris. It's gonna be fun to see how quickly the salmon get through there and on to the upper river.

    Here's a link to the project's FaceBook page that has all the latest, plus two short (and not that good) videos of this final blast:

    https://www.facebook.com/elwhariverrestoration
     
  5. searun14

    searun14 New Member

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    First chinook could be seen as early as fall 2015. That's optimistic, but other benchmarks have been passed earlier than expected.
     
  6. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Finally, some good news. Thanks for the updates, guys.
     
  7. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Another question in my mind. I was watching a video on Youtube, about the silt from the second dam. According to the vid, the silt was a good thing for sand lance and other salmon food. I was under the impression that silt was bad for the redds. Where am I going wrong?
     
  8. ryfly

    ryfly Addicted to flyfishing

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    Short term silt is ok, long term silting is bad.
     
  9. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    So the plan is that once the silt is in place, the flushing action of the river will open the raceways for the redds to develop?

    Will the silt not hamper the fish for some time?
     
  10. jeff bandy

    jeff bandy Make my day

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    The Sandy had redds the next year. They thought it would take up to five to clear out. But one good season of flushing and it was clear.
     
  11. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Well that is good news. Thanks for the info, guys.
    Silt for the sand lance to lay eggs, food for the salmon to lay eggs, food for the steelhead.

    It is all good. Ain't Mother Nature Grand.
     
  12. rwbailey05

    rwbailey05 GO COUGS

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    Ill be on the Sandy this weekend.. how far upriver was the damn site?
     
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  14. Bruce Baker

    Bruce Baker Active Member

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    Yes, the silt is good for the Sand Lance and the silt they are talking about is the silt that is being deposited at the river's mouth. The delta is getting built up and creating more habitat for the Sand Lance to lay their eggs.
     
  15. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    Sand lance and surf smelt spawn high up on the intertidal portions of the beaches. They deposit their eggs among the very small pebbles found on the upper reaches of the beach. Because those eggs are so high on the beach they are exposed for extended periods of time as the tide is out. Those eggs are vulnerable to being dried out. Having a sediments mixed in with those spawning pebbles helps to retain the moisture the eggs need to develop and successfully hatch. When one thinks about it is amazing how the various fish found in the area have adapted to natural processes of the area and each species carving out special niches in those dynamic processes.

    BTW -
    The source of those critical sediments typically are inputted from eroding bluffs or river sediments. That is way the hardening of Puget Sound beaches and bluffs with rip-rap etc. has such negative impacts on the forage fish base of the region.

    curt
     
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