Epoxy question

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by Northlake27, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. Northlake27

    Northlake27 Member

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    Just curious what kind of Epoxy folks use for Ferrules, reel seats etc, I have been using Flexcoat with pretty good success.
    I have heard Golfsmith makes a two part epoxy that is suppose to be great. Anybody have any experience with it?
     
  2. SuperDave

    SuperDave New Member

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    Flex-coat works for me too. I wouldn't deviate from it on something I "heard". If you have an actual recommendation, fine (maybe). My recent "expoxy horror" taught me NOT to experiment because a real MESS can result.

    Why change a good thing?

    SuperDave
     
  3. Craig Hardt

    Craig Hardt aka Nagasaurus

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    Just for clarification are you asking for finishing epoxy (for use on thread wraps, etc) or component assembly (bonding the reel seat to the blank for example) epoxy? They are usually very different products that you won't want to interchange.

    U-40 Rod Bond is tough to beat for component assembly IMO. It is a thick paste that won't run all over the place, flexible when cured, and doesn't require super accurate proportions of the resin/hardener when mixing. It is also slow curing to give you plenty of time to get things lined up.

    I've never heard of any finishing epoxies that are made for rod building being "bad" and it comes down to personal opinion on how thick/thin you like the consistency for applying the finish on thread wraps. I'd stay clear of anything not specifically made for rod finishing on your wraps.
     
  4. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    So I'm assuming that you've been using the Flexcoat rodbuilding epoxy, not the finish. In general any thick viscosity epoxy will do okay, but there are a couple of things to keep in mind.

    1) The more expensive epoxies tend to have better "wetting" properties. This means that when they are applied to a surface, they tend to get into the minute cracks and scrapes in a surface and bond really well with them.

    2) Most epoxies will generally be strong enough to bond, but it is questionable enough that they are "flexible" enough as well. In general I tend to also stick with Rodbond, but for some tasks, I do use 30 minute epoxy (Devcon). I *only* use this stuff in areas I know won't flex (such as reel seats), as I don't want a grip to come loose.

    So the short of this is, if the rod building epoxies are nearly the same cost (which I believe they are), and they work fine, why look at something else?

    -- Cheers
    -- James
     
  5. SuperDave

    SuperDave New Member

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    Is there an echo in here?

    SuperDave :rofl:
     
  6. Northlake27

    Northlake27 Member

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    Like I stated in my original post I am happy with the Flexcoat, however I have had failures with other brands of Epoxy and am always curious what other folks are using. The Golfsmith product was reccommended on a Bamboo rod forum and if it is superior and other builders are using it maybe it is worth a try. I am always looking to improve my quality. The people I build rods for expect the best and that is what I try to provide.
     
  7. SuperDave

    SuperDave New Member

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    Considering that once set epoxy is PERMANENT why experiment on an expensive rod build up? Gone awry, epoxy can create real problems; I don't think that's something you want to do.

    If you DO select an epoxy other than Flex-coat, let up know how you like it. We can learn from your example; we can "hear" it from you.

    SuperDave
     
  8. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    If you are looking for "THE BEST" slow cure epoxy, then just head straight to rod bond. Strong, durable, easy to work with.... For 5 minute, I've really liked the flex coat the best. For 30 minute, I've had *very* good results with Devcon clear.

    And to add more info I've used:

    5 minute Devcon clear -- worked okay (a bit brittle)
    30 minute Devcon clean -- worked well
    30 minute Flex Coat -- worked well
    5 minute Flex Coat -- worked well
    5 minute Ace Hardware brand clear -- sucked bad (very brittle, poor bonding)
    5 minute Super Glue Brand -- sucked bad (very brittle, poor bonding)
     
  9. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    deleted dup...
     
  10. Wayne Kohan

    Wayne Kohan fish-ician

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    One other comment - 5 minute epoxy may not give you enough time to place your reel seat and grip in the right place. Suggest using the 30 minute epoxy, and I also vote for Rod Bond. Great stuff, great for gluing cork rings, plenty of work time, etc....

    Wayne
     
  11. In_too_deep

    In_too_deep Member

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    I use the Golfsmith epoxy for building golf clubs but have never used it for any rod building. I can tell you that the stuff is really strong and sets up overnight with enough working time to get a reel seat and grip into place. Why I think it is being recommended is that it sets up soft and flexible while maintaining adhesion, the fully cured stuff is barely dentable with a hard fingernail. I'm sure it will work perfectly for reel seats and grips but don't know if it would be worth the extra trouble.

    Personally I use aerospace grade epoxies with specific additives for rod building and thread wraps, only because I have it around for other uses. Before that I used boat building epoxy (West System) and that worked too.
     
  12. luckybalbowa

    luckybalbowa Member

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    I personally use rod bond for cork and reel seats, but I know of a lot of good rod builders who use gorilla glue.

    As far as finish for wraps, nothing can beat threadmaster. better leveling, longer pot life, shorter cure time and the biggest and most important difference is how clear it is after the curing process. It's like glass
     
  13. Jim B

    Jim B Active Member

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    Many years ago, I learned from an older woman (Maggie?) who worked at Kaufmann's Fly Shop in Bellevue that WeldWood wood glue was the best for both the reel seats and the cork grips....she had learned this tip from rod builders at Winston. I've used it on probably 15 rods, and it's great to work with.....it's a tan powder that's mixed with water and turns a light brown, so it's easy to clean up, and it sets overnight, so you can move things around for awhile if needed. It's really great for gluing cork rings, since it's almost the same color as the cork, and it's easy to sand than epoxy in a lathe IF you don't let it set for more than a day or two (it gets as hard as epoxy after that). And it's never broken down on any of my or my buddies' rods, some of which are 10+ years old and have handled many steelhead and salmon. Another tip......lightly sand or scuff the blank and the inside of the reel seat to roughen the finish abit before you use any glue/epoxy....the bonding is stronger.