Epoxy

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by LoonhauntDave, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. Derek Day

    Derek Day Rockyday

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    I would suggest that you either keep the epoxy in your pocket while you're getting other stuff ready (before you mix it). Or you can get one of those coffee cup heaters and keep some heated water in your work space. This will help keep the epoxt thin, it's really helped keep bubbles out of my wraps.
     
  2. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Once again, the application of heat can exacerbate the problem with bubbles. The more it's heated the faster it will set. While it's nice to start out with, reducing pot life is the exact opposite of what you want. Epoxy temps around 70-75 degrees are what these things are made for, and keeping close to this is one of the best things you can do.
     
  3. FT

    FT Active Member

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    Many of the things James speaks of I learned the hard way 30 years ago. As a result, I will never use heat on epoxy rod finish. Any of the major 2-part rod finishes produce a good, smooth finish; however, the light versions are less prone to produce bubbles and work better on fly rods because they require 2-coats to make a good finish.

    This said, I have a decided preference for Frondak's U40 LS Supreme (which is made in Monroe, WA) since I started using it because it has fewer bubbles than Flex Coat (which I used for nearly 30 years). Threadmaster is rapidly gaining a following, but I've not used it.

    The biggest thing you can do to get a nice bubble free finish is use one of the light 2-part finishes and pour it out on aluminum foil (I use an old pie pan covered in foil for this, but any shallow, fairly wide container covered in foil can be used. Heck, even a paper plate covered with foil works fine). Then let it sit on the foil for 1 or 2 minutes before you start applying it.

    You could also forgo the 2-part finishes completely and use Trondak's U40 one-part finish. Granted it takes 4-5 coats to get a good finish that covers all the thread completely, but it produces a great finish without bubbles because it is as thin as varnish. The downside, once you open the bottle, it will only last a few weeks before it solidifies in the bottle because it cures from the nitrogen in the air.
     
  4. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Actually it's a moisture cure urethane.... People in Arizona have little idea how fast it really cures, as they don't know what it's like to keep it here... Last bottle I had lasted around 2 weeks before it was hard junk!
     
  5. FT

    FT Active Member

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    Thanks for the correction on what cures the U40 one-part finish James.

    I really like the finish it produces because it looks a lot like a finely fiinished, varnished cane rod complete with a great depth to the finish the 2-part finishes don't give you. The downside is it requires about 5-6 coats applied over 5 days to get the really wonderful finish you can with it. Then you have to wait about another 4 days before you go fishing with the rod to be sure it is completely cured. But like you, I found it doesn't last very long after the bottle is opened; therefore, I view it as one rod per bottle.
     
  6. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    I too like it a lot. Gives you that "classic" lacquer look with a lot more durability...
     
  7. Gunnar

    Gunnar New Member

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    I totally agree!!!
    Ditch the Flex Coat and get some Threadmaster:thumb: It is a superior product!
     
  8. EMPyre

    EMPyre Erich with an H -Top Water Soldier-

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    Just a thought but... if it cures due to moisture wouldn't squeezing down the bottles to remove the air prevent shelf curing? Or does this stuff grab so much moisture out of the air that its a lost cause?
     
  9. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Glass bottle.... some folks do move it to a dispenser that can be collapsed...
     
  10. LoonhauntDave

    LoonhauntDave New Member

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    Well,

    I am going to dump the flex coat. I have had a horrible experience as of late. I have built a number of rods, but this last one has been hexed or something. I am going to order some threadmaster before I waste anymore time with the Flexcoat.

    Dave
     
  11. LoonhauntDave

    LoonhauntDave New Member

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    Do you recommend the U40 Perma GLOSS OR LS supreme one is a two part the other not. Just curious?
    And how do does it compare to threadmaster.
     
  12. LoonhauntDave

    LoonhauntDave New Member

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    I am putting my epoxy coating on hold. I ordered threadmaster and Trondak Perma Gloss, I am going to do some experimenting.

    My dry box micro environment worked pretty well. I will put up some photos. As soon as I have touched all the rough spots in the frame for the box.

    Thanks for all the help folks.
     
  13. James Mello

    James Mello Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"

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    Depends on what you want. I like LS Supreme and it's my coating of choice. It's a bit harder to work with than Flexcoat. I haven't dropped the coin for Threadmaster, mostly cause I still have a ton of LS supreme. The U40 for me has been relagated to "classic" looking thread wraps. It'll look like varnish, but wear like iron.
     
  14. Wayne Kohan

    Wayne Kohan fish-ician

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    I have used a lot of the Threadmaster, and I just love the finish. However, it has a quicker set time and the bubble issue is there with it as well. I just received some Threadmaster lite, which is new and will use that on my next rod, possibly ready to do some this weekend. I'm hoping that the thinner nature of this will allow me to be better with the bubbles. BTW, I agree with James and the straw thing, that is how I do it as well.

    I have found that the best way to get a bubble free finish is to not mess with it too much. The more you mess with it, the worse it gets. Apply the finish thinly, blow out bubbles, do the rotating and plan on two or more coats.....


    Wayne
     
  15. LoonhauntDave

    LoonhauntDave New Member

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    So.. my bottle of Perma Gloss just showed up yesterday. Why oh Why did I not find this stuff sooner. It is by far and away the easiest material that I have ever used for thread coating and applique work. I have been using threadmaster, and it is just too thick.

    Nice and thin, clear and plenty of pot life.


    Dave