Euphusid/Amphipod Patterns For SRC

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Cannon, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. Cannon

    Cannon Member

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    Was wondering some of the patterns for euphusids and amphipods you guys use in the sound?During the winter here on southern Van. Isle it is the most available food source.At times the Cutties can be very selective.What line and presentation do you use?Also,ever try any sand worm patterns?
     
  2. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Here are a couple of patterns that I have been using for a few years. The amphipod is mine and the euphausid was developed by the late Bob McLaughlin.

    The amphipod (sorry it doesn't show up too well) is tied on a size 16 scud hook and is simply a body of cream-colored dubbing with about 8 strands of orange Krystalflash pulled over the back (the body is then picked out on the underside to simulate legs). This represents what seems to be the most common size and color of amphipods in the areas of Puget Sound that I fish in the late winter and spring. I have found it to be highly effective for sea-run cutthroat and especially for resident coho at that time of the year. I fish it on a floating line; allowing it to drift with the tidal current, keeping the line just tight enough to feel the strike.

    Bob McLaughlin's euphausid is also quite simple, Krystalflash, cactus chenille (estaz) and plastic dumbbell eyes (or black bead chain for a little faster sink rate). I tie it in sizes 10-14 and fish it, on a floating line, somewhat more actively than the amphipod pattern; swimming in the current with an occasional twitch. Euphausids usually hold their bodies straight while swimming, only adopting the "crayfish snap" when fleeing danger. The pattern can be tied backward to simulate this.

    Tie in a clump of pearl Krystalflash to represent the tail and a few strands to represent the antennae. The body is pearl cactus chenille and the fibers are clipped away over the back and allowed to remain full length underneath to represent legs. Pale orange or pale pink are also good color choices.