Favorite easy dry fly patterns

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by troutaholic, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Messages:
    24,690
    Likes Received:
    3,511
    Location:
    Dillon, Mt
    I like the simple flies so I can tie them up myself. EHC,Stimulator,Comparadune(sp), I also like the Adams family of flies but can't tie them so I buy them,along with Royal Wulff and humpies. I have found by changing colors on the EHC as to what rivers they work best in.

    Jim
     
  2. dmoocher

    dmoocher Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Olympia, Wa.
    Learn to tie a parachute hackle and you're on your way. Stimulators are a bear to learn...the proportions are critical...an easier way to match stoneflies is to do deer hair "Bullet head" madame-X patterns...pretty easy and will always ride upright (unlike EHC's or stimmies). I don't like the long palmered hackle 'cuz they sit so far off the water and they roll. I've got 'em and tie 'em but I always clip the bottom hackle flat first.
     
  3. Wakemaster

    Wakemaster New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2003
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    .
    If the emphasis is on simplicity and ease of tying I would start with black/white or brown/white bi-visibles in sizes 12 to 16 or 18. Once comfortable with dry fly hackling I would move to either a goofus bug (easier) or humpy (harder) to get used to incorporating deer hair. Note that all three of these are older generic patterns that are uniformly high floating--and very good for rough streams where imitators are not as necessary as on flatter water. My final candidate would be a dark foam beetle of any one of a number of patterns with a bright indicator on top. Once that one is comfortable with tying these one is ready to move on to the more complex flies such as the stimulator and the parachute patterns. The elk hair caddis is an excellent pattern that could be inserted in with or just ahead of the goofus bug.

    I was reminded of the versatility of the bi-visibles this past season when I was tying #22 and #24 Griffith's gnats and I tied a few straight grizzly hackled bi-visibles just for fun. Both worked equally well on large resident cutts in flatter water of Rocky Mountain streams.

    :thumb
     
  4. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2004
    Messages:
    7,175
    Likes Received:
    1,267
    Location:
    Not sure
    You want en effective, easy to tie dry pattern? Two posts already named it: Hans Weinmann's CDC & Elk. Same great profile as an EHC and floats like a cork, but takes just two ingredients. Go here for step by step instructions: http://www.danica.com/flytier/hweilenmann/cdcelk.htm It's a kick-ass pattern for trout streams everywhere. Just remember not to put floatant directly on the CDC.
     
  5. Curtis King

    Curtis King Fish Magnet

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richland, WA, USA.
    Since you asked for an effective chironomid pattern, I have a brief description of one that, at least for me, works exceptionally well. You will need the following:
    a) Size 16 or 18 straight eye nymph hook (don't use cheap hooks)
    b) Tiny brass bead (3/32), nickel finish preferred
    c) Brown or black flexifloss
    d) Fine silver wire
    e) White ostrich herl
    f) Black 8/0 thread

    1) Slip on the bead and tack with Zap-a-gap
    2) Dress the hook about 1/3 of the way back, then tie in the silver wire with about 6 wraps.
    3) Now tie in the Flexifloss and as you wrap back towards the rear of the hook, start to pull it so it necks down. This gives the body a nice abdomen and a thinner tail.
    4) Wrap the thread tightly until you are starting down the bend of the hook towards the point, then wrap back to just below the bead.
    5) Wrap the Flexifloss towards the front, starting very tight and gradually lightening up, then tie off and trim. Be carefull, since if you pull the floss too tight, it can snap back out of the tie down.
    6) Reverse wrap the silver wire using a wide gap between wraps (4 or 5 wraps should do it), then tie off.
    7) At this point, I add 3 or 4 half hitches and put a drop of head cement over the hitches.
    8)The last step is to tie in the ostrich herl just below the bead. 3 or 4 wraps in place will do the job. Finish with 5 whip finish wraps.

    I used this pattern last year with UNBELIEVABLE success. Fish it with a strike indicator and hang on. Hope it works for you too!
    :professor
     
  6. SG

    SG New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    I live in sweden so I don't know wich insects to imitate.
    Is it much ants swarming in the summer? Caddis swarms, or mayflyinvation...

    Becouse i only fish in Scandinavia I don't know any good flies for you, but if you show me some insects maybee I can rekommend some swedish patterns with american colors.

    "Sorry for my worthless english"
    // Simon Kjaeldgaard Greising
     
  7. troutaholic

    troutaholic Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Home Page:
    Thanks Spey! I've gotten great responses on the dry flies but none on the chironomids except for yours :) I'm going to tie some of your pattern up this week! I've seen some other small fly patterns (like the original RS2) that require a straight eye hook. Why is that necessary? Is it for better hooking qualities or a more lifelike shape of the fly? Thanks again for the great recipe and detailed instructions... :beer1
     
  8. troutaholic

    troutaholic Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Home Page:
    Hey Simon thanks for your reply. Here in the Northwest, we don't typically see alot of mayfly hatches (at least I don't on the rivers that I fish- except maybe the Yakima). What I see alot of though are small dark caddis flies (about size 14-18). I think they may also be called "sedges". They're almost always around, and then occasionally I see a mini "hatch" of somewhat larger caddis flies a little larger (12-16) and a little lighter in color. I guess this is why out here we use alot of attractor patterns, chironomids, and terrestrials. What patterns do you use in Scandanavia that might work? By the way, I spent some time years ago in northern Norway- such beautiful country, I 've always wanted to return :D ...
     
  9. SG

    SG New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ok. Then I got some patterns for you.
    First of all you have the superpupa.

    Hook: Dryfly size of your choice.
    Tyingthread: Colour that is similiar to the head of the imitated insect.
    Body: 2/3 In your case dark flyrite. 1/3 (The colour on the frontbody of the insect your'e imitating.
    Bodyhackle: Use similiar colour as the legs on the insect to be imitated.
    The hackle should be hakled all over the body with the fibres facing slightly forwards.
    After tying the fly, cut the hacklefibres over and under the fly, so that the hackle only sticks out on the sides.

    This fly is very popular in Scandinavia and it can be tied in millions of colourcombinations.

    Good luck!:professor
     
  10. gotchasr

    gotchasr Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Kirkland, WA, USA.
    If you are looking for an easy chironomid pattern, there is nothing easier than a snowcone. White enamel bead head, wire rib, and a thread body tapered to the bead. Tie it on a Tiemco 200R, or equivalent. Very, very effective.
     
  11. troutaholic

    troutaholic Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Home Page:
    What colors/sizes do you find to be most effective?
     
  12. SG

    SG New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    >What colors/sizes do you find to be most effective?

    In sweden, yellow/black, olive/yellow olive/brown is common colorcombos.
    Sizes between 14-18. 16 is a good size.
    Make sure that the hackle isn't to long.
    Good quality hackle is required.
     
  13. Curtis King

    Curtis King Fish Magnet

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richland, WA, USA.
    Hey trouty,
    The reason I use straight eye hooks, right or wrong, is related to the chironomid and how it hatches. Next time you are on the water and you see them hatching, look closely below the surface for rising larve. My observations indicate that they swim (float) STRAIGHT up from the bottom. A curved eye hook can cause the bug to rise in a zig-zag pattern when drawn throught the water. To best mimic their pattern, I use straight eye hooks and a loose loop to tie them on. That way they stay STRAIGHT up even as you draw them through the water.

    :beer2
     
  14. troutaholic

    troutaholic Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    University Place, WA, USA.
    Home Page:
    Thanks Spey! I'll check out the naturals the next time I can....
     
  15. gotchasr

    gotchasr Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Kirkland, WA, USA.
    I don't know if the size/color question was directed at me, but the colors I use most are black and olive. However, you should probably also have some brown and red. Sizes...well, that depend in part on where you plan on fishing. As a general rule I tend to carry sizes 10-22.:p , but if you want something more reasonable I'd say sizes 12-18 would cover just about any situation.