Fiberglass vs graphite

Discussion in 'Bamboo, Fiberglass & Classic Reels' started by Bill Johnson, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    Thanks for the update :thumb: on 'S' and 'E' glass ... working (from my end anyway) from a 20 years + "back in the day" memory.

    fae
     
  2. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Over the past half dozen years, I've finally learned that my own spastic casting stroke is a lot more efficient when using a medium action or slower rod. As a result, I've pruned all my former graphite 'rocket launchers' from the closet, although I still have a set of medium-action Sage SP-5s in 3wt to 5wt and a medium-fast SLT-5 in a 6wt for big fish in wind.

    Part of what caused my re-evaluation was my exposure to bamboo rods, nearly all of which are waaaaay slower than even medium graphites. I learned that I could cast a cane rod nearly as far and just as accurately as a graphite one but with less effort and end-of-day soreness was a true epiphany.

    Here's a modern glass rod built on a Lamiglass 904-6 that a friend wrapped up for me last spring. The sections are just under 17" and the whole tube fits nicely inside even my smallest day pack. The action is slow but completely progressive, even with all the joints, allowing me to easily bang out 35-40 foot casts from a float tube. I don't fish for steelhead or salmon any more, but even a little trout feels like a steelie on this beauty!

    [​IMG]

    K
     
  3. Mike Ediger

    Mike Ediger Active Member

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    What does better mean?

    I have no problem with these debates, but I don't think it ever has to be about money, name brand, or material. Yet this is often what we want to debate.

    Ultimately it always comes down to does the fishing tool do what you want it to and do you enjoy using it.
     
  4. Nick Clayton

    Nick Clayton Active Member

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    I wish I had some extra money so I could pick up a glass rod. Always wanted to try one, as I think I lean towards slower actions myself. Perhaps I'll sell/trade a rod or two sometime to get my hands on one.
     
  5. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    Now THAT IS ONE COOL STICK! :thumb:

    fae
     
  6. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Now that manufacturers regularly break the $700 barrier for single handed rods, it really IS about money - or the lack of it.

    Unfortunately, in order to drive demand for their uber-expensive rods, the makers also have to crank up the advertising machine in an attempt to convince prospective buyers that the only way they'll ever catch that fish of a lifetime is on a $700+ rod that most folks can't afford.

    K
     
  7. Mike Ediger

    Mike Ediger Active Member

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    I guess that is true based on how you are looking at it, but it doesn't have to be for the consumer. He asked what is "better" and he used $$$ and material as the variables. My point was it doesn't have to be about those two things. While I will awknowledge that some rods or materials have their strengths and weaknesses, this debate will always be about what do you want the rod to do, and what do you enjoy; however we often make it about cost, name brand, and material. When you can build a Batson (or several other brands) for less than half what Sage or Winston costs, it doesn't "have" to be about cost. You don't "have" to pay $700 for a top of the line rod.
    So to a certain point I guess I agree with you, money will certainly always be an issue, especially if we think we really have to have a certain name brand, but it absolutely doesn't have to be as much about money as we make it.
     
  8. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    Mike, define "top of the line". :confused:
     
  9. g_smolt

    g_smolt Recreational User

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    Some fly rod manufacturers have developed a certain cachet, and in doing so they have developed the brand into something the casual or infrequent fisher lusts after because s/he thinks it will alter their performance.

    All of these discussions on gear performance seem to have a fetishistic bent, as if the user of the tool has no power over the outcome of the test or trial.

    If a $50 fiberglass rod fits your casting idiosyncrasies better than any other rod on the planet, then it is better.

    For you.
     
  10. Mike Ediger

    Mike Ediger Active Member

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    Poor choice of words on my part...I should have said "quality". However, even talking about quality or "top of the line" is still a matter of preference. There are those who think that the top of the line Batson is equal if not better than top of the line Sage, at half the price.
     
  11. hedburner

    hedburner Member

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  12. wet line

    wet line New Member

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    Kent,
    that is one very nice traditionally wrapped rod.

    It always amazes me that on many of the "high" end high priced rods the wraps are so minimal. It's kind of like the manufacturers name makes up for the visual appearance of a nicely wrapped rod. True the wraps don't catch more fish but they definately add to the visual esthetics of the rod!

    I like the classic look and your rod definately has that!

    wet line Dave
     
  13. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    I certainly agree with you. The Lamiglass 6-piece I posted above cost less than $120 for the blank, shipped. My friend Bill Z. wrapped it for the cost of the components plus a nominal charge for his time (he's been wrapping rods professionally off and on for 20 years or so and is now in charge of production for FethaStyx).

    So while its certainly true that one can get a fine rod for substantially less than $700, the plain fact is that neither Lamiglass (or Batson or Pac Bay or other equally good blank makers) can afford to pop for full-page full-color ads on the inside and back covers of fishing magazines every issue to help stoke demand.

    For those new to the sport, or those easily swayed by such marketing tactics, the $700 rod is simply more desirable.

    K
     
  14. Mike Ediger

    Mike Ediger Active Member

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    Agreed, and you hit the nail on the head with your last word, at least as far as the point I was trying to make. The original question was is a high dollar graphite rod better than glass that is cheaper. I asked, what does better mean. As you pointed out, I think many times because of marketing, most people think more expensive and the latest Generation 14 graphite = a better rod. I was just trying to point out that in my opinion this shouldn't be how we place value or determine which is "better". If you like a Lamiglas that cost you $200 and it does what you want it to, and you enjoy fishing it, then there is no reason a $400 graphite is going to be better.
    Mike
     
  15. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    :beer2:

    K