Finns VS Oars

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Chef, Oct 19, 2010.

  1. themaninthemoon

    themaninthemoon Just waiting on warmer weather, .......

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    Man, oh man,
    You guys are way to physical for my taste, (or condition).
    Since I blew out the L-4L-5 & the L-5S1 discs in my lower back the best I could possibly do is to row for awhile, maybe, ...well no more than about 2 &1/2 hours solid. Then I'll be almost completely worn out, & in some form of severe pain.
    But then, that's why I bought two trolling motors, mounted one up front for steering, then mounted and ran wiring from a switch up front to the one in the back.
    It's a helluva lot more convenient, (once it's in the water), but increases my gross weight of the craft alot. So there is/will be a trade-off disparity if I am forced to portage around any logjams, dams, etc. Still, I think I'll take my chances, if I stay in Indiana, I can fish a number of lakes/impoundments or the streams & smaller rivers here, or if I decide to shoot over into Illinois & put in on either the Fox, Kankakee, Vermilion, Illinois, or Rock rivers. There is great fishing all over these rivers, lakes, etcetera, in many areas, & the different species are as varied as are their numbers.

    I guess it all boils down to if you're comfortable with the fins, & you're going to putz around a lake, then go for it, if you're going to run moving water then maybe you'll need both, or if it's got any whitewater, you might just want to get familiar with a good set of oars.

    I would definitely consider any/all safety options first & foremost, prior to making any decisions about going out on the water. It'd be even more helpful if you had someone to pair up with the first few times that you venture out on the waters anywhere, or at least till you become familiar with the area's hazards/attributes, as well as your craft, & all of it's little nuances.

    Safety goes hand in hand with having a successful trip, it is the essential equal in the planning of your outing.
     
  2. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    So, you can't use your legs? Two motors, one for steering? Why not use one, turn the head so it is facing the same as the prop. Mount on the back. Leave straight and just steer with flippers? Less weight and for me, quick response.
    Plus even with a motor, I haul oars. The motor allows me to get out farther, but I don't trust electrics that much. Had a Minn Kota die on me in the middle of a lake. Would have killed myself kicking back.
    Then the storms that hit Henry's. I have the motor full blast and row!
     
  3. themaninthemoon

    themaninthemoon Just waiting on warmer weather, .......

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    When I blew out those two discs, just breathing hurt like the devil. After the surgery, & into physical therapy the original breath-taking pain faded away. I've managed to learn to cope with the pain to some degree. I am in constant chronic pain nonetheless. I can't pedal a bicycle in a horizontal, or vertical position as it really gets the pain level of my threshold up there. So finning around is pretty much a "No, thanks anyway." situation.

    Allow me to explain the best I can.

    Last year I went to the VA, (Jesse Brown Hospital, Chicago, IL), to have a colonoscopy. They couldn't get to two of the polyps for fear that they would pierce the wall of my large intestine. So they scheduled me for surgery, & on the given day I went in under the knife. They took a third of my large intestine, from the ileocecal valve, to just below my appendix. That was September 25th. After ten days there, they sent me home to recover. I was back up there seven days later for another surgery in the same area, only this time they had to take about ten inches of my small intestine because of a massive blood clot, in the Venus something something. This massive clot had caused gangrene in the small intestine & killed that part. I guess I'm lucky to be alive, it took a lot out of me, made me weak like an infant for a while. They kept me there for another seventeen days. The anesthetist that was in charge of me during the 1st surgery told me that even though I was unconscious during the surgery, he had a hard time keeping me under because of the chronic lower back pain that I am in. I guess that the pain not only continues while one is under the influence of the drugs, but that because of the positioning, the pain level increases. Manual pressure applied to certain pressure point spots on my lower back, helps tremendously. When I say that I cannot stand, sit, or lie down for very long, it's not because I'm trying to get any freebies from Uncle Sam, it's because I'm in actual pain, all of the time, & staying in one position for too long only increases my agony.
    Pain, true pain, the one true emotion, will yank you out of a deep sleep, take your breath away, and let you know that,

    "YES! YOU SOB! YOU ARE ALIVE! Otherwise you wouldn't feel this! ! !"

    Oh yeah, it really lets you know that you are STILL alive.
    So, while I live with this, (pain thing), constantly, I am still a true outdoorsman & a fisherman. I fight the pain the best way I can, I put one foot in front of the other and take another step, & if it gets to be too much, then I just sit down for awhile, take a break, & rest as best I can, then after twenty-thirty minutes, I stand up & take another step. If it gets to where I can't handle it, I'll take a Tramadol, or if it's severe enough, I'll take a Vicodin or two. They are only 500mg so they work in tandem pretty good, but have side effects that I don't care for, so I try not to take any if I can help it, or fight it.
    But please understand, that this doesn't ruin my life or dampen my spirit, ...just changes the way that I must do things. It takes me three times as long to get my craft in the water, so I need to stay on the water twice as long, (at least), to get my dosage of satisfaction in. If it rains, I don't care. I try to go prepared for just about anything old Mother Nature can throw at me, short of a full blown lightening storm.
    And as long as the good Lord sees fit to treat me to a couple of decent sized keepers, then I'll try not to disappoint him, by taking more than I need. I've finally managed to get one of the Harbor Barber's to go with me down to Willow Slough a few weeks ago, but we couldn't go out on the water because of it being waterfowl season already. I still managed to pull a largemouth out of there that was as long as our newspaper flyer for the Strack & Van Til grocery store, & the fillets that I took from it were bigger than I could fit into a 12" skillet, so I had to break them down into smaller equally sized pieces. Yessir, been a long while since we've had a good fish dinner. It was delicious. I had gotten a very simple batter that my main fishing partner had gotten off of the internet. He said it tastes just like Long John Silver's batter. I tend to agree with him, it is really tasty, & works on onion rings too.

    Ok, I completely agree with having a backup plan (like the oars), as it's fully compatible with the safety thing. I hope that you also wear/carry a PFD while your out on the water, especially with the inflatable. A small almost unforeseeable invisible pinhole can ruin a great time on the water.
    "Swimmin wit da fisheys", is absolutely not on my list of things I must do today, when I'm out on the water.
     
  4. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    Wow! Hang in there..... I have broke my back three times and all three locations (upper, middle, and lower). Pain sure but nothing like what you have...OMG! You made me hurt just reading.

    Back to the subject, I just figured two motors would really draw a battery down, plus having to carry the extra weight TO the boat.
    One battery and motor are bad enough. My oars are maybe 3 lbs.
     
  5. themaninthemoon

    themaninthemoon Just waiting on warmer weather, .......

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    Yeah, that's what I mean. It takes me longer to get the darn thing assembled, & in the water, so, I stay out there almost all day, or all night, whatever. I take a cooler full of ice, pop, bottles of water, sandwiches, candy bars, etc. Oh yeah, I almost forgot, I learned a long time ago, (back in my canoeing days), that it always pays to carry a 1/2 used roll of TP squashed down to fit into a seal locked baggie, that I carry along in my sling, along with some rechargeable battery operated tools, (weigh scale, depth finder, headlight, etc.). Little conveniences, (like the TP), make life a lot more bearable, (& easier to use than trying to find & use a corncob when you're out on the water.) Having a little humor helps. It's not like they have a porta-john out there next to the lily-pads, ya know?

    I can't wait for spring this coming year. I'll have my other trailer ready for the inflatable pontoon by then, as well as having registered it, & the craft with the state, because of the trolling motor thing. (I bought a two-man Outcast toon frame from Riverman, earlier this year, along with a set of 14' Maxxon tubes.)
    Then I should be able to get some real time on the water. As I said earlier, safety is on equal terms, when planning a trip. Being legal is an integral part of the planning.
    nuff said.
     
  6. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    Way to deal with it. Hat is off to you.
     
  7. themaninthemoon

    themaninthemoon Just waiting on warmer weather, .......

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    Chef,
    I apologize for seeming to hijack your thread, but felt like I needed to explain the reasoning behind my choices.

    I did a float tube trip on the Iroquois river earlier in the year before I blew out those discs, (October, 2004), & I'm quite sure that the short 3' wooden paddle kept me more mobile than fins in the shallower stretches, but having a few "go to"options are essential.
    The only way you can keep your options open is to take as much with you as you care to carry, then hope you have enough of the right stuff, just in case you actually have a need.
    I've found that experience is the best teacher, learn & know the waters your going on, then make up a gear list with at least one alternative for each thing you decide to take with you, listing it's priority of importance. Things like carrying stick matches in a small waterproof medicine bottle, & also keeping a couple of good butane lighters full are also a couple of items that I carry, wherever I go. TP+corncob (scratch the spare corncob) Matches don't take up much space but corncobs do.
    Well, .... you know what I mean right?
     
  8. cboston1617

    cboston1617 New Member

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    I float a toon' down the yakima river often. I believe the danger of fishing while running the river is dangerous in a pontoon. If I hook a big fish, lose my concentration for a moment, and come into a corner....could be curtains. Not a good plan. I'd leave the fins at home and use the pontoon for transport when floating rivers.
     
  9. Chef

    Chef New Member

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    cbo: at least you would go out fishing and hooking a fish! :)