fishing for meat

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by martyg, Mar 29, 2006.

  1. martyg

    martyg Active Member

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    It looks like April will see Ling Cod and Halibut open. Is there anything worth pursuing in the S. Sound? Even if it involves hucking a big herring on a 3 once weight I wouldn't be opposed to some fresh, non salmonoid fish.
     
  2. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    No much for butts, but should be some lings. Only problem is finding them and those who know the good spots are tight lipped. Find the right rocky structure and you may do alright.
     
  3. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    Since lings and halibut are all wild fish how do folks feel about taking them for the table?

    Always interested in folk's preception on what is acceptable fisheries management for various species .

    Tight lines
    Curt
     
  4. Anil

    Anil Active Member

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    I personally have a hard time killing a fish that has a 30+ year lifespan, such as a Lingcod, particularly, in areas with limited numbers. Almost all ‘trophy’ lingcod are breeding females to boot. I choose not to keep them, and urge others to do the same.
    As an added deterrent, an apex predator that has lived in polluted water for a dozen years or more probably has quite the collection of toxins in its meat. Besides, there are absolutely no Lingcod in the Puget Sound. ;)
    Anil
     
  5. martyg

    martyg Active Member

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    Good feedback. Thanks.
     
  6. crazysalmon

    crazysalmon New Member

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    What is wrong with keeping something for the table if the season is open, you have your license, you bought a boat, you put fuel in it, all the gear. I could go on. I wouldn't keep a large halibut of 50+ they are breeders and most likely female. The flakes of meat are large and grainy. Lingcod on the other hand, I don't keep just because my wife has seen the color of their meat before it is cooked (blue, green) and wont touch it. I on the other hand would love to have a 15 pound ling for fish-n-chips once in a blue moon. I wouldn't try to scare someone from pursuing them with toxins or lack of fish. Martyg they are out there look for rocky pinnacles. The halibut are in the Straits halibut bank, salmon bank, and hein bank. Few places to start.
    I caught an eleven pound blackmouth Tuesday in area 7. It was delicious, hope you guys don't hate me. It was a hatchery fish. Most if not all blackmouth are.

    Get out have some fun and feed the family once in a while.:)
     
  7. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

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    I ran out on the S Jetty at the entrance to Grays Harbor today about an hour before noon, tossed a leadhead plastic and caught a juvinile Lingcod about 20", which I released. If it had been a keeper, I would have kept it. I only kill one or two lingcod a year for the table. Season opened out here on the 18th. Did bring home one nice black rockfish for dinner. Then I had to run back in and go to work.

    Jimbo
     
  8. Jeff Dodd

    Jeff Dodd Active Member

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    Curt,
    If I catch a halibut in Mutiny bay I plan to keep it. But that's a pretty big IF.

    If I catch a Ling cod in the San Juans this spring, I'll keep it too if legal to do so.

    If I catch a Ling down by the Langley marina I'll release it, because my guess is this population is not very strong, and maybe, someday, my son can fish for them because the population has rebounded.

    If Coho runs are healthy enough to keep wild coho in my home area, I don't see why I wouldn't keep one now and again to share with my family. But how am I to know the answer to this question? Should I assume all wild salmon runs are unhealthy runs and they should all be released? If so, I'll make that suggestion during next years comment period.

    Last season I released wild coho and ended up not catching ANY hatchery coho - so we ate Pinks, and I don't like to eat pink salmon.

    My intention are good and I never keep more than 10 or so fish a year. My opinion on keeping fish to eat, however, may be in the minority.
     
  9. gigharborflyfisher

    gigharborflyfisher Native Trout Hunter

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    One problem with bottom fish in the S. Sound, a lot of them tend to be very wormy. It is not as bad as it used to be, but should be taken into account. You are probably much better of head out to the Strait or Ocean.
     
  10. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    Crazysalmon -
    What is wrong with keeping a fish for the table? I see nothing wrong with it at all. A fish for the table are an important of our angling heritage.

    Jim -
    I hear you about the ling cod - I think they are one of the best eating fish that we have here locally and I typicall keep several a year. I do select those that I keep (like fish in the 30-32 inch range and from waters that I don't feel are heavily poluted).

    Jeff -
    I to will be out on Mutiny Bay looking for that elusive halibut. If my partners or myself are fortunate enough top catch one you can bet it is destined for fish and chips. I also agree that the odds are long that we'll get one but hey it is a fishery that is different from my normal haunts and that makes an enjoyable day on the water.

    Yes I even keep some salmon while most are hatchery some wild fish do end up on the table.

    My point is that where biologically sound there this nothing wrong with harvest a few fish now and then. However we as a community seem to go nuts if some one attempts to harvest a wild trout or steelhead. From a biologically presepctive there really is not different in killing a say a wild sea-run cutthroat from a healthy population than a ling cod from the San Juan Islands. I agree that CnR fisheries for the cutthroat makes some good sense but that is based on my social value of the fish/fishery - too much fun to catch than eat. My pevee is when we attempt to take those social values and attempt to impose them on others based on some biologicial arguements that we are more than willing to ignore with another species.

    Just something to "chew on" so to speak.
    Curt
     
  11. Jeff Dodd

    Jeff Dodd Active Member

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    Curt,
    Thanks for the response - I appreciate your line of thinking.

    Good luck on April 9th!

    Jeff
     
  12. Dick Warnke

    Dick Warnke was Pram-Man

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    My way of thinking is that if I really need a fish for the table these days I'm more apt to opt for Safeway, Albertson's, Johnny's Seafood. etc. Bottom fish in the Sound are becomming rare and it is definetely due to over harvest. Whens the last time anyone has caught a nice True Cod in the Sound?. I personally don't think any of these fish are going to rebound or make a come back. The damage is done. :(
     
  13. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

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    Pram-Man, Yeh, I figure that 2# rockfish cost me about $50 in "opportunity loss" at work...as there is no end to work for me at this time of year (being a "yard guy"..."Git 'er done!"), but it was almost T-shirt weather out there yesterday, and the high tide was just after noon...had to go answer the siren's call!
    Damn...things are drying off here now and i've gotta go hack lawns.

    Jimbo
     
  14. Dick Warnke

    Dick Warnke was Pram-Man

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    Jimbo, My concerns arn't really with the coastal or ocean stocks for Sports Fishing harvest on bottom fish. I think seasons and limits and individual constraint will help in over harvest by the rod and reel guy. I,m mainly talking about Puget Sound. All though it has been written that commercial ocean harvests of all fish stocks have depleted them up to 90%. How that will ever be able to rebound or recover is way beyond my comprehention. :confused:
     
  15. polepole

    polepole New Member

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    Does it change your thinking if Lingcod actually have a 20 year life span and reach sexual maturity at 4 years (20" male) and 7 years (24" female)?

    -Allen