Fishing the bottom.

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Dustin Bise, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. Dustin Bise

    Dustin Bise Active Member

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    I thought this would make a good thread so...

    What are you're favorite techniques for fishing deep in the summers? Times when you need to drop to a shelf thats 50-60 feet deep? So far I have just used the sink rate of the line to guess or wait for it to hit bottom then start the retrieve. I think adding a high floating line in a 5-10 foot section could possibly provide good results for keeping the fly down low but suspended off the bottom. :beer2:
     
  2. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson Yakbowbw

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    Read an article about using a full sink line to drop to the bottom with a 2'-4' leader attatched. They said that they used a floating fly like a spun deer hair carey special. The line sinks to the bottom and then the fly floats above the bottom. When you drag your line along the bottom it kind of stirs up the bottom suspending the food in the water. The author felt it was kind of like ringing the dinner bell and there was your floating fly suspended in the dinner line. I haven't had the guts to try it yet, full sink lines are expensive. I would hate like hell to snag my line on the bottom and have to cut or snap the fly line in order to keep the rod and reel. I need to find a grassy bottom area to give this a try.

    Other than that I have used the count method, or a pair of hemostats attatched to a chrono dropped to the bottom to set the corky. Pretty simple stuff, not very creative.
     
  3. Steve Birrer

    Steve Birrer Active Member

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    50-60' deep? Surely you are joking me. The only fly line that is going to go that deep is a seriously heavy depth charge like a 600 grain. No floating line is going to hold that kind of a sinking line.

    I can't for the life of me imagine fishing for trout that deep 25'. Ok. But 50 or 60 not a chance.
     
  4. ceviche

    ceviche Active Member

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    Fishing deep during the summer? Sorry for raising the red flag, but I don't do that anymore when it comes to lowland lakes. The water is too warm. The lack of dissolved oxygen in the top several feet of water puts too much stress on trout when you catch them. Unless you are fishing high-elevation lakes or plan on eating what you catch, it's just a bad idea.

    If for some reason you feel you absolutely have to fish during the summer, be willing to wait a very long time cradling the trout until it is strong enough to swim off on its own. I read an account of an angler holding a trout in a stream for over 15 minutes before it was able to swim off on its own.

    Remember: If you aren't going to eat it, don't kill it.
     
  5. Dustin Bise

    Dustin Bise Active Member

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    Just haul em in real fast and slip the barbless out without removing them from the water? What if there is a cool spring on the bottom of the lake that the fish congregate on? Are the dissolved o2 levels in such a place any better?

    and yes... i do absolutely have to fish in the summer. I can see no other options.
     
  6. Kaari White

    Kaari White Active Member

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    Then fish for something else (bluegill and bass come to mind). When you've exhausted the fish, how are you going to revive them when the top 2-3' of water is 70+ degrees? That water contains too little oxygen to revive a trout and I'm betting your arms aren't long enough to reach the deeper, oxygen rich water.

    Please review the section entitled "Stillwater Ethics" in this well written article on lake fishing http://www.washingtonflyfishing.com...illwater_Fly_Fishing__Having_a_Game_Plan.html
     
  7. Ethan G.

    Ethan G. I do science.. on fish..

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    I go by the assumption that fish below 6-9 feet are not actively feeding and I either leave or target something else. Especially in Summer.
    -Ethan
     
  8. ceviche

    ceviche Active Member

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    iagree CWUGirl pretty much tidied up that issue. Do read the article. Many of us have transgressed in this manner before, so feel no shame and go forward with wisdom.

    Here's a piece of suggestion that you might find positive. If you enjoy stillwater fishing as much as I do, concentrate your fishing during the coldest months of the year. Throughout late autumn and into early spring, you should be able to find good trout populations in the shallows. Moreover, during the depths of winter, you will find the largest trout spread out through the shallows. If you have the stamina to handle the cold, you will find a lot of jumbo trout willing to take your fly. Almost all of my best trout have been caught in winter. Why work so hard?

    --Dave E.
     
  9. Gorgefly

    Gorgefly Member

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    My suggestion would be to go high or go north for trout in summer.
    Many of the high lakes are plenty cold enough and I also like to drive up a couple three hundred miles into B.C....oh, and yes...sinking lines...and yes, the trout will feed in 40-50 feet of water up there.
     
  10. Steven Green

    Steven Green Hood Canal Pirate

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    iagree

    fishing deeper than that is boooooooooooring.
     
  11. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    With a fly line, even fast sinking, it will be virtually impossible to reach 50 - 60 feet depth. However, I have fished a few high lakes that are 30 - 50 feet down. We often fish as deep as we can get because that's where the bigger fish are.

    You could put a down-rigger on your fly line if you want to get seriously deep, I am half-way joking but if you feel the need to go really deep, a down rigger will work. But is that fly fishing?

    Keith
     
  12. Nolan

    Nolan New Member

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    Dustin I have fished a couple lakes that were that deep I use a type 6 and just slow retrieve with buggers or chrominoids. For me its more about the structure than the depth. Fish off ledges and shelfs but I haven't had much success at depths of 50+ feet.

    As for the trout that die during the summer months I wouldn't worry about it too much unless you want to. Trout are going to die even during spring, fall, and winter months from lack of food, mishandling, and other predators in lakes or rivers. I try fish for bass/panfish during the middle of the day and trout during the morning and evening. I do get trout during the middle of the day and just haul them in as fast as possible and don't touch them unless you have to.
     
  13. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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    I fish for Kokanee and Cutts in Lake Cavanaugh from 40 to 70 feet deep. I made up a line from a thread posted about a year ago here. Basically 30 feet of T-14 I got at AATF with 200 feet of amnesia backing. I marked it in 5 foot intervals. Short leader, one butt section 12", shock gum rio 6" another 12' butt then about 3' of 6 lb. flouro. The cutties really slam it (I usually let them go unless it's
    one of the bigger ones for the smoker. I'm dialing in on the Kokes for the table fare.

    Forgot to add, I only fish the lake in Spring and Fall

    Daryle
     
  14. ascender

    ascender New Member

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    Go north and fish the travelers and then find the bombers. More fun than fishing holes. Fishing lakes deep that are warm as hell on the surface means that your trout will likely never make it back down to there alive. That is poor form... then it won't even taste good.
     
  15. Kaari White

    Kaari White Active Member

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    Your argument is that trout are mortal and die by other causes, so who cares that C&R in the summer months is ineffective on many lowland/basin lakes? In my opinion, anglers should be concerned with the survivability of the fish they're releasing...or else C&R is a total joke. Actually, it's worse than that because it's wasteful- at least a bait fisherman eats his catch and is compelled to stop fishing by law when he reaches his limit (even if he C&R'd the fish).