Flies for stillwater

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Chef, Dec 7, 2010.

  1. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    Why does it sound like fly fishing is complicated. Most flies that are out there will work in both still water and skinny water. Even Chronomids will work in Skinny water. If they are small enough that is. Zebra nymphs come to mind.
     
  2. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    Jim, you're correct about many of the fly designs crossing over.
    It's not flyfishing that's complicated, it's flyfisherman.
     
  3. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Yeah, but that is what makes it so interesting.
    Some great people are flyfishers. I have met quite a few.

    But you have to admit that the OLIVE BUGGER is one of the
    best flies around. LOL

    Chef, put a few in your fly box with a selection of sizes.
    Maybe a few black buggers and of course, the brown bugger.

    That alone, should fill a small fly box.
     
  4. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    So true. I've branched out into a lot of fun styles of flies but I still put a lot of fish in the net with olive buggers.
     
  5. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    My 5 year old daugher put an 18" trout in the net with an olive bugger. She still talks about that trip often and knows when the weather is nice she wants to head out again. Her 7 year old sister was jealous about staying home for that trip.
     
  6. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    My personal preference for lake fishing is
    Parachute Adams for a dry.
    Wooly bugger for a wet fly
    I plan to try some scuds this summer
    and some chronnies. I have never fished either.
    Shame on me.

    My fishing partner and myself tie and fish what he calls a brown bomber.
    It is a red glass bead head, brown body with brown palmer hackle and a brown marabou tail
    Ugly thang. I think it scares the fish into jumping into the net.
     
  7. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    I've had my best luck trolling on lakes with a Yellow Bugger. Plus this will also work in Skinny water.
     
  8. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    One of my problems is that I have so many fly boxes filled with flys that I sometimes don't know what I have. I have tried to seperate them out by putting all of one type in one box and all of a different type in another etc. I usually wind up looking for one and I can't find it.

    I think I will limit my selection to a few flies that have worked in the past and when I get to the water, I
    left that one bug, that would make all of the difference, at home.

    I thought that I could separate them all out by bug but that just adds to the number of fly boxes I need and I can't find anything now. I usually take one or two boxes with flies that I think I will need and fish them. When I get to the lake or river, I will mostly fish one or two flies and that is it.

    Maybe my old brain is just jello. Anybody got a good system that works for them. I really don't need
    to carry seven fly boxes with me.
     
  9. BFK

    BFK Member

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    I've got the same problem-- too many flies (so why am I tying more?) in too many boxes. However, as part of my resolution to do more lake fishing this year, I'm working hard on it. My current thought is to build a large box, or a series of large boxes, in the fashion of the bvig ones they use in the UK. I figure that if I can put all lake flies in one or two big boxes, saltwater stuff in another, then I'll be in good shape.

    That's my theory, anyway. I'm also trying to condense my fly tying supplies, but that's another big issue. Don't know how to handle that at all.
     
  10. Olive bugger

    Olive bugger Active Member

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    Now the trick would be to get the bugs to comply. All of the bug=fly combinations in one box would only be permitted to live in a lake environment, and all of the bug=fly combinations in another box for river drifts.

    You know that just might work. Now if I could only get the bugs to cooperate.
    They would have to control their color and size too.