float tube?

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by colton rogers, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. SlipperyTrout

    SlipperyTrout New Member

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    The other week, in my pontoon boat, I just brought a nice trout to hand, turned around to cast, and a dang snake was in the water, real close, headed my way. It wasn't very big, but it curled up with it's tail in the air a little, let out a hiss that curled my hair, and with my not so perfect eyesight, and vivid imagination, I thought it was a rattler. It wasn't, but if it was, and had I been in my float tube, my 2 options that my pontoon boat offered wouldn't have been available. Option 1, row like hell. Option 2, whack it with the oar. Since it wasn't a rattler, I let it hitch a ride back to shore in one of the forward pockets.

    Another time, in my float tube, one of my fins came off. I didn't lose it, but I gave up getting it back on in the middle of the lake. It took a real long time getting back to shore with one fin, with me the whole time praying the other fin don't fall off, or the wind don't come up, or both. Again, more options in a pontoon boat, including just putting the fin back on.

    I guess my point is, a pontoon boat may be more trouble to haul around, but when things unexpectedly go wrong on the water, a pontoon boat can keep you out of trouble a lot better than a float tube. Just sayin'.
     
  2. Luke Davis

    Luke Davis Member

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    I just got a Creek Company ODC 420 tube for around $150 bucks. Definitely a great tube for the money and its worked awesome so far.

    Two seperate bladders, which blow up super fast,and a seat cushion that sits you high out of the water, so it is a very comfortable
     
  3. Tim Lockhart

    Tim Lockhart Active Member

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    Real men use roundboats. Modern designs are for the other 95 percent.
     
  4. Big E

    Big E Moderator Staff Member

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    The newer float tubes with the chair style seating are pretty safe until you scootch to the end of the seat, pull your waders down and try to take a pee. Don't try it...trust me.
     
  5. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    I've had a Buck's Bag tube for years. It had a secondary tube on the back for a backrest. I can't imagine using a U-boat even though there may be some advantages. The disadvantages are that they sit higher and are more prone to the wind and if you poke a hole in your tube you may have to buy new baldders. I, on the other hand, just replaced the 20" truck tube for a song. The first tube lasted more than 20 years. I don't use it much now because I have a pontoon boat but there are times when I get out the neoprene waders, fins, and tube and head for a lake. It's all in what you are accustomed to.
     
  6. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    What I never got accustomed to was that delicate dance one does wearing fins when trying to enter the original 0-tube designs. It's not for nothing that they're referred to as the 'donuts of death'.

    K
     
  7. Tim Lockhart

    Tim Lockhart Active Member

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    Using Roundies:
    I usually step in on land, pull the tube up like my britches, then walk out (or crawl in if "pondfishing"). Not as easy from the water but I still find it's not bad until you're 2.5+ feet deep. That said, type of tube and fins, plus your size and phys condition will factor in. I'm tall/skinny and I know that makes a big difference. Besides, most donuts are only rated for 225 or so. They work great if you're smaller and in decent shape...highly maneuverable in the water and great on the trail, plus easiest of all to transport/store. On the other hand, not an option for bigger boys and a nightmare for most seniors. Casting: round, v, u, toon...it's all the same: If difficult it's not your boat.
     
  8. Steve Saville

    Steve Saville Active Member

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    My tube has a quickfast buckle in it You can undo that and slip the tube over you head but i've never needed to do that. I just get in at water's edge by carefully inserting fins and then pulling the tube up to waist lin e. Back in and sit down. It's worked for years. You have to use caution with everything.
     
  9. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

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    My first tube was canvas with a truck inner tube, no pockets, no back rest. It was only a few years ago that I bought a FatCat. Consequently I have spent an awful lot of time in round tubes. Getting in and out is not difficult or dangerous. It just takes a little practice. As FF said "step in on land, pull the tube up like my britches". I am neither tall nor big around so that may be an advantage.

    There is no doubt that round tubes are better in the wind. Not only do they present a lower profile but they are round so they deflect the wind evenly as opposed to the flat sides of a U or V tube. The result is that the wind does not spin you around as much. You don't have to struggle to keep the pointy end directly into the wind. As for speed through the water they are a little slower but so what. Most of the time you want to move at a slow controlled speed anyway. If you need to beat back to your put-in against the wind there is almost always a wind shadow along one shore line. For the most part speed is a non issue just as slightly higher increments of graphite modulus is a non issue.

    In addition to the wind advantage, round tubes allow you to lean forward and rest your elbows on the front of the tube.

    TC
     
  10. Riffle

    Riffle Fish to Live - Live to Fish

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    Be sure and get the right kind of fins! THe first time I ever tubed was in a borrowed donut with borrowed fins, THe fins were an old school pair and not flexible, i wore my self out quick. If you get new fins buy them at the same place you buy your tube. If you get used make sure they are the softer flexible kind.

    I bought my first tube, V open end style, at what used to be Sportsman's warehouse in Silverdale. That was two years ago and it was only around 129.00 I think. Still holding up great so you don't have spend a ton of money if that is a factor. Don't forget a pump, the higher the volume the less time you spend blowing the think up. i use a K Pump. :beer2:
     
  11. Jim Ficklin

    Jim Ficklin Genuine Montana Fossil

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    For what it's worth, many years ago I built my first tube out of canvas, an inner-tube, & latex cement right after I discovered fire & the wheel. It was primitive, I was dirt-poor, but it got me out to where the fish were. Get what you can afford that works for you . . . they all have advantages/disadvantages but beat the hell out of flogging the water from the bank & not being able to reach the fish.
     
  12. Greg Armstrong

    Greg Armstrong Active Member

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  13. rymo

    rymo Member

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    I'll pile on the love for the FishCat 4. I bought mine a couple months ago and have had it out several times. Super comfortable, plenty of storage and quick to fill on site if needed.

    If you can afford the extra $75, I'd recommend the FishCat 4 Deluxe - it has inflatable seat and backrest, making it much smaller when not in use than mine (with foam seat and backrest). I think either would be heavy to hike too far in, but the size of the foam pieces in mine would make it just plain unwieldy to carry on a trail.

    -rymo
     
  14. nz trout bum

    nz trout bum Member

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    Go to classified fast. A fish Car 4 just came up, brand new in box and $100 including shipping. Good luck. W
     
  15. FlyOnThe Beach

    FlyOnThe Beach New Member

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    I have a round Caddis (15 years), a bulet U-tube (14 years) and a Trout Unlimited Pontoon (3 years). I use all of them still. Here's the run down on them.

    1) Round tube - most stable and has the most pockets of all my boats. Boat is light and has backpack straps for hicking into places. Can use the truck tube or if packing it in there is a tube made of the same material as the backrest for ease of inflating/deflating. The downside is its hard to walk with fins and tube on (many unwitnessed headers into the water or downhill), slowest in water due to drag.

    2) U-boat. This is the most used. Great for medium to small lakes. Tube is easier to paddle and get around then the round tube. Tube is easy to inflate and deflate as well as carry. The downside is your in the water from your waist down (same as the round tube)..

    3) Pontoon boat - Can paddle with fins, oars or use a trolling motor. Sits high out of water and makes casts easier and longer. Feels like your fishing in a Cadillac. You can use the pontoon on a river. Downside - wind really effects this tube and blows you around. You'll circle with one anchor if wind keeps changing. It is hard to keep boat in one spot if there is any wind. This is heavy like #80 without it being loaded. It is a real pain unless someone else fishes with you. I even leave it inflated on a flatbed trailer.If you use a battery and tolling motor it is a hassle to get it all together but nice once your in the water.

    Overall, if I could only have one tube it would be my Bucks Bag Bullet. If I had to replace it right now I think the best choice would be a Fish Cat Deluxe V-tube. This improved design now enables the user to be higher out of the water than a standard round or U-tube.