Fly lines for Salmon

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Jonduke, Oct 6, 2001.

  1. Jonduke

    Jonduke New Member

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    I'm getting a new rod, reel, and line for salmon and steelhead flyfishing... I'm fairly new to this aspect of fly-fishing, so should I get a sink-tip or a floater? I'll mainly be fishing small rivers and creeks, some around here and some up North in Alaska, so I'm not usre if I really need a sink-tip. Thanks in advance-
    Jon
     
  2. Rob Blomquist

    Rob Blomquist Formerly Tight Loops

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    You really ought to have both. I can't imagine not having a sink tip line.

    If you were going to buy one now, I would lean toward the sink tip. I really love my type 4 sink tip from SA. Casts like a rocket, sinks like a rock, and great for those deep pools.

    Rob
     
  3. guest

    guest Guest

    all i know is that i use a sink tip 99.9 of the time fly fishing. if i didnt have one i probley would catch as many fish. Ben
     
  4. guest

    guest Guest

    would't i mean
     
  5. steve s

    steve s Active Member

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    if i were you, i would think about looking into a multi-tip system, they are a bit more expensive, but then you aren't stuck with a sinking tip, when you need a floating.
    or just get a floating line and purchase sinking tips separately, either way, you'll probably be using sink tips more often than not.
    steve sample
     
  6. ray helaers

    ray helaers Active Member

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    Here's what you do:

    Buy a standard wieght-forward floating line for whatever weight rod you buy, and a SA type-6, 30' shooting-taper in the same weight. (Get some advice from a fly shop on the best line for your rod; sometimes you might want a line one size "lighter" or "heavier", depending on the rod.) Cut 15' off the front of the floating line. Cut the shooting taper into two sections, one 13', the other 17'. Attach braided mono or kevlar loops to the butt-ends of the 13' and 17' sink-tips, the 15' "floating tip", and front of the floating line. Viola! You'll have a good, basic salmon and steelhead set-up, good for most situations.

    When you're ready to spend a little more, buy another shooting taper and cut it into 10' and 20' sections and attach the loops; then you'll be ready for just about anything.

    This set up is versatile, the cheapest way to get this many options, makes for easy tip changes in the field, and casts well (better than any manufactured sink-tip I've ever had). I wish I could tell you it will guarantee fish.

    You can just get the basic SA weight-forward or steelhead taper, which is reasonably priced, and a shooting taper is around $30 I think. If you know how to make your own loops, the six feet or so of braided mono costs a few cents. If you don't know how, most fly shops will do it for you for a few bucks. I now for sure they'll do it at the Downtown Seattle Kauffmann's (maybe even for free if you buy the lines there.) So a system with two sink tips and a floating tip will run about $70-$75, two more sink tips for another $30. I think Rio makes a pre-made system, but I don't know how much it costs, and I've never had a Rio line, so I don't know how well their system casts.
     
  7. Jonduke

    Jonduke New Member

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    Thanks for the info everyone, with a little advice from a fly-shop I'll be set. Thanks again-
     
  8. Robin

    Robin New Member

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    Everything Ray has said makes great sense and I hear works just fine. Many use this system.
    I did opt to go to the Rio mid spey interchangebale system (cost about $130 plus additional charges will be for the backing), I haven't fished it all that much yet,so far it is working well for me. I am small in size and use a double handed rod, and no complaints yet.
    However what I wanted to make sure and say on this post,when the shop or you wind your spool, make certain that you have a LOT of backing and a good type of backing, no wimpy stuff here, and as much as you can get on with the type of line you decide on, at a minimum of 150 feet, you are better off to have more (200-250) if it will fit on the spool. That as well, will cost a little extra- about 4-8 cents / ft. for the backing. Check the shops they will tell you and will treat you good when you buy from them, Most of them will anyway.
    Go fish!
    Robin