For all the Pass lake guys

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Daryle Holmstrom, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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    I Guess I meant the size you caught, I borrowed a commercial prawn pot from an Alaskan prawn fisherman and caught about 300 in one soak, my six year old son just about climbed out of the 8 foot Columbia at the time when a couple escaped with the claws at full attack. But we munched on the thumb size tails. Boiled for 15 minutes in salt water. They are probably still there and the Browns still crunch them. Just wanted to let some fellow fly fish persons for some other patterns for Pass.

    Daryle
     
  2. SuperSecretCIA

    SuperSecretCIA Be Like Mike!

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    Reminds me of one of my favorite memories from Pass Lake…

    One morning after a couple hours of rewarding fishing, I beached my pontoon boat at the south end launch area and decided to have a nice relaxing lunch on shore. I had arrived early and had parked my crew cab closest to the lake, so I just flipped down my tail-gate and set my strung up fly rods in the bed of my truck. As I sat there enjoying my sandwich I noticed that something else was looking for lunch. I watched a nice Brown cruising the shore looking for minnows. After observing his feeding pattern for a few minutes, I decided to make a few casts while sitting on my tail-gate. The Brown was polite and at least looked at some of my offerings, but no hook-up. I was content to watch the Brown do his hunting, but then I remembered that I had tied some of Gary Borger’s “Fleeing Crayfish” patterns. I thought why not? I quickly tied the crayfish on and cast it out to settle on the bottom and wait for the Brown to return. Mean while another fisherman pulled into the parking lot and asked me how I was doing. We chatted for a while, then I noticed my Brown returning. I told the other fisherman to watch this Brown’s reaction, and proceeded to make three short strips while still sitting on my tail-gate. That Brown slammed my fly so hard I almost lost my rod. I didn't have to set the hook at all, and when the Brown felt the sting of the hook, he blasted out of the shallow water about three feet high looking like something from Bass Masters! The look on the other fishermans’ face was priceless! I finished fighting that Brown on my tail-gate then finally got down to release him. 24” Brown Trout, not the biggest I have landed, but definitely the most memorable.
     
  3. Chromer

    Chromer Defeat terrorism

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    Large crawdad aka. "Big Daddy":thumb:
     
  4. Bill Dodd

    Bill Dodd Bill's in a time out.

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    I have been told Lake Washington Has some very large Caryfish and I'm sure if a person had a trap with a big enough entrance hole they could catch some big crawdads in Pass Lake.
    Got to love them cooked in salt water and served with butter and lemon.
    All this Pass lake talk is making me want to fish it.
    Anyone know how conitions are up at Pass?

    Bill Dodd.

    :)
     
  5. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    All the lakes have them in there. Along with the rivers. Have seen some in the N/F Stilly. Don't know why more don't use that pattern. Just don't eat the Blue ones.

    Jim
     
  6. PT

    PT Physhicist

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    Why the olive tie instead of a more natural brown? Just curious.
     
  7. JRSly

    JRSly Oncorhynchus clarki clarki

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    They are very opportunistic, I agree.

    I kind of agree.

    I agree, browns are dominantly piscivorous, so are cutthroat and larger rainbows.

    Dan, it isn’t that I disagree with you, I just agree for different reasons than you presented. All trout are opportunistic, but between rainbows, cutthroat and browns, rainbows are the most. The morphology of a fish can tell a lot, and I bring this up because it is useful when looking at what fish eat. Look at the difference between relative mouth size of our rainbows, cutthroat and brown trout. They will be in increasing size in that order. It all comes down to prey type and availability. A large rainbow, and in some cases even browns aren’t going to go in search for small trout/sculpin/crayfish if there is a bunch of aquatic insects available with minimum effort. Why waste the energy searching, and chasing a larger prey if you can get a larger net gain in energy by eating something else. Yes, the best food for fish is fish, so if it is available they will munch on fish, but there are a lot of factors working together here. Larger fish eat a lot of sculpins (and crayfish when available) because that is the easiest to catch and the most dominant prey, with the greatest net gain in energy. It is a lot easier to catch a sculpin than it is a trout. If you see a sculpin in a stream you can often just bend over and pick it up with a little practice (I have done a lot of field work with sculpins), this is a lot harder to do with little trout.

    Sly
     
  8. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    Yes but think about how many more bows are caught on chiros than browns, and then how many browns you catch on baitfish/crawfish patterns. Also you have to remember that fish in lakes cruise, so they have to move anyway. After fishing rivers in montana I know that certain fish will not eat nymphs and that some fish will only be caught with streamers. For instance, on the upper madison around three dollar bridge where it is a 75/25 rainbow to brown ration, but when I streamer fish it I almost never catch rainbows, maybe 1 for every 15 browns. The rainbows you do catch are often large, and they have lots of teeth look more aggressive than you average rainbow. Big trout have little problem catching baitfish, as they have a bass like suction system that inhales what ever they want to a certain extent. All rivers are different though, and one river can have fish with total different feeding habits than a river just one valley over.
     
  9. JRSly

    JRSly Oncorhynchus clarki clarki

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    Dan, I don't think you read my whole post, either that or you just don't understand. Just now you basically said the same thing I did in the post before, please re-read it before you disagree with what I have to say. I wasn't disagreeing with you, I was just pointing out that "large rainbow, and in some cases even browns aren’t going to go in search for small trout/sculpin/crayfish if there is a bunch of aquatic insects available with minimum effort." Now if a prey of fish is easily caught and available larger trout (browns, cutthroat and rainbows), like I pointed out in the earlier post (and you did in yours with the example on the upper Madison) will choose that because like I said before "the best food for fish is fish, so if it is available they will munch on fish." Again, I am just repeating what I already said, so please re-read my earlier post. You are just restating what I just said in different words.

    Also, if you are agreeing now that rainbows will eat aquatic insects, then why did you argue with cascadekiller earlier? Yes the diet of larger browns and cutthroat might be more fish based, but he didn’t say he was talking about them, for all you know he could have been talking about normal rainbows. The fact is that trout are opportunistic. Browns and cutthroat tend to be more piscivorous, but if there isn’t fish around they will eat aquatic insects, even your upper Madison browns would if there wasn’t any baby fish.

    Sly
     
  10. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    No doubt, I understand you fully, and I didnt really disagree with you. I was just adding on for the most part...
     
  11. Islander

    Islander Steve

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    Crayfish change color depending upon their surroundings. In clear water situations, you should try to match the color of the bottom. Grey, brown and olive are common. In darker water, black, dark green and dark brown are more likely to work. The crayfish underbelly cannot be altered by it's surroundings. Often the bellies are white or orange in color. I have some tied in several colors and fish what works at the time. Something I carried over from all those years buzzing around the Delta in my Ranger 373 ripping the lips off bass. That and "catch and release". :beer2:
     
  12. Mingo

    Mingo the Menehune stole my beer

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    No kidding.............here's my uncle "Barnacle Bill" Bocephus with a beauty from Pass taken several years ago, plus another shot of the same critter trying to steal his boat. They're sneaky............beware!!!!!!






    :clown:
     
  13. cuponoodle breakfast

    cuponoodle breakfast Bigfoot is blurry

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    Well, this thread got my attention. With the rivers blown out and my new 'toon looking me in the eye, I tied up a bunch of crawdad patterns based loosely on some I found in a catalog. It's been a few years since I've fished Pass, but I will be there soon.
     
  14. Chet L

    Chet L New Member

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    Crawfish, Mud Bugs,, whatever, Coat them thoroughly with Old Bay Seasoning, steam them over beer, serve them with a tub of ice filed with Deschutes Brewery 'Mirror Pond'. Fabulous