Forgive my heresy...carp eating...

mr trout

Trevor Hutton
#1
Ok, I really don't feel too bad, since carp are becoming a problem more and more, I am getting into bowfishing to get some time on the bow until deer season. - however - I don't like the prospect of just wasting a bucket full of 20 pound fish... I realize that carp aren't the finest table fare around here, but how would you cook 'em up? ( I dont need the "cook 'em with a boot and eat the boot joke"...) I am thinking fish and chips? maybe.
Should I look at it like coyote hunting and just not worry about it? (or make wallets from their skins?...heh)
Thanks - I think... :rofl:
 

Andy

Workin in a sweet mullet
#3
There were a bunch of Japanese exchange students when I went to EWU that would eat carp all the time that they would catch at _______ lake out there
 

mr trout

Trevor Hutton
#7
Backyard said:
Trevor... Ever caught a 20# or more carp on a fly rod?
Can't say I have...Sounds a little scary and hard.... But I do know some spots. It seems like just one more thing to figure out, plus would a 6 wt be enough? Or do I need this excuse to justify getting another rod...
For some reason it seems like fun to shoot 'em though. Thats the redneck in me...
 
#8
I have a friend who is friendly with a Korean convenience store owner near his home. He has a very large family & they just love shad. My friend never has to buy beer during shad season :) ! (He doesn't fish for carp.) That might be one option that you could look into. Another is, You probably have a number of large migrant worker families nearby that maybe could really use it. The problem is how to you broach the subject delicately? There may be an orginazation you could contact. Here in the portland area we have "Friends of migrant workers" a little shoestring orginazation that helps out.

One thing to keep in mind is Carp are long lived. So make sure they are safe to eat. Heavy metals & pcbs are a real problem in long lived fish species. Check with WDFW to make sure they are safe to eat where you are.

I'm curious though, Where are they becoming a problem? I don't remember hearing recently about carp problems. Other than the general paranoia about carp eating eggs & fry. (Which is unfounded for the most part).

Cheers........Todd
 

mr trout

Trevor Hutton
#9
Todd Connelly said:
I'm curious though, Where are they becoming a problem? I don't remember hearing recently about carp problems. Other than the general paranoia about carp eating eggs & fry. (Which is unfounded for the most part).

Cheers........Todd
I was under the impression that they were a non-native species, and I would assume that they, like all organisms, compete for resouces (that should be going to our native fishes). I have seen carp in the rivers around Yakima, and other areas. "Problem" may have been an overstatement, but carp are an invasive species aren't they? I really don't know too much about carp to be honest.
 
#10
When I was a kid, I use to tell the story about how I chopped a carp in half with a double bladed axe. I said there was a large black thing that ran the length of the fish and that it was shit. Remember, I was a kid. I never did that and I have no idea as to how they taste. All I know is that Europeans dote on them and that they know their food. I would eat carp now. I am older and wiser.

Bob, the They eat mostly greens why shouldn't they taste good? :thumb:
 
#11
Have ate a bunch of carp. Not my fav but very edible. Have seen a bunch of recipes on the web, I cut out slabs and fry em like anything else. I keep the heat lower and cook em longer that I would bass fillets, hoping to soften the bones I have missed. I don't like the dark meat near the skin. Try it just for the heck of it.
 
#12
God dammit! The post is so damn nasty! :beathead:

Dude, you have to see what's inside carp before you eat them. There are totally made of guts. There's got to be a mixture of 100 colors of guts in there..


Todd Connelly said:
I'm curious though, Where are they becoming a problem? I don't remember hearing recently about carp problems. Other than the general paranoia about carp eating eggs & fry. (Which is unfounded for the most part).


And by the way, I'm a conservation guy, but I've definitely got to disagree with the Portland guy that says that Carp are not an epidemic. Carp were imported to some Czar that lived on the Columbia in the 1800's. Pining for his wonderful exotic fish of Asia, he imported them to his pond just off of the Columbia River. The Czar admitted great surprise when the 10 fish bought were greater than 100 by the following summer. The Columbia River blew out that following year and the carp entered the system. Anywhere that connects to the system, either via a seasonal canal, runoff creek, etc, now has carp. Carp are extremely hardy and can stand high temps and low oxygen levels.

Why are they problematic? Because of their method of feeding. They suck up aquatic weeds by the roots. When their locale is completely devoid of vegetation, they plunge their down-spouted sucker mouths into the dirt and suck up gobs of dirt. You will notice "pock marks" on carp flats. They have a filter/teeth area in their throats that separates the food from the silt. They then eject the silt out of their gills. In doing so, the water is filled with particulates, and the sun has further difficulty, Illuminating the bottom, and plant life suffers. No plants, no aquatic invertebrates to feed on the plant, and if no aquatic invertebrates, then no trout. Oh, stunted largemouths and crappies can exist in this situation, but I wouldn't call it a "sweet-ass lake" by any means.
 
#14
Mr. Trout wrote;
"Can't say I have...Sounds a little scary and hard.... But I do know some spots. It seems like just one more thing to figure out, plus would a 6 wt be enough? Or do I need this excuse to justify getting another rod...
For some reason it seems like fun to shoot 'em though. Thats the redneck in me..."

Your 6 wt should be fine. A lot of people use them. I'm new to carp fishing myself and I've only used my 9 wt so far. It is difficult but not that scary. Plus I think a lot of the skills you'd learn on the carp flats would translate well to the trout stream or lake.

As for bow fishing I'm sure it is a lot of fun. & I have nothing against it.
I do feel the fish deserve better though. I think as Backyard hinted at,
if you caught a 20+ pounder on your 6 wt you would too!

Mr. Trout wrote;

"I was under the impression that they were a non-native species, and I would assume that they, like all organisms, compete for resouces (that should be going to our native fishes). I have seen carp in the rivers around Yakima, and other areas. "Problem" may have been an overstatement, but carp are an invasive species aren't they? I really don't know too much about carp to be honest."

They are a non native species that's true. But not invasive exactly. They won't compete directly with trout. If a trout streams water quality degrades enough (Temps rise, gravel silted in, things like that) the Carp may move in as the trout move out or die off. But the carp don't cause the problem. They can survive & even thrive in shockingly poluted water but they don't cause the polution.

Cheers.......Todd
 

Zen Piscator

Supporting wild steelhead, gravel to gravel.
#15
I do like to catch carp on the fly, and 20lb fish are fun, but they arnt something i would eat. The columbia river, which is my favorite carp fishery, is somewhat poluted, and seeing that one of my favorite flats is directly downstream of the boise cascade paper mill, im sure those fish absorb a few harmful chemicals. Carp are long lived and im sure all that sucking and filtering of mud and sand has helped them absorb toxins. I have heard the taste of wild strain non demestocated carp is very good. The polish eat carp instead of turkey for christmas, and often keep them alive in their bathtub for several days because the demand near christmas drives the price of carp sky high. The common carp throughout most of europe and all of america are from a highly domestocated genepool. Wild, native common carp have more muscle mass for their weight than the carp we have here.

Peace,
Andy