Go to Stillwater Set-up for New Water

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by camtheflyman, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. tkww

    tkww Member

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    Not trying to make this complicated for you, but if you're going to go with two sinkers, I'd be tempted to say you'd get more use out of a type 2 and a say a type 4 or 5. The type 2 is going to pull you down a little quicker, but conversely if you have to fish 15-20' down--and I think you'll find that's not as uncommon as you imagine--something heavier than a 3 will serve you well. Again, not trying to make it complicated, but I think a F / 2 / 5 would be much more versatile than a F / I(1) / 3. Unless you know you're going to be only in shallow lakes.... But, that set-up does leaving you just needing to ad a 6 or 7 on down the road and you'll have the a great range. I dunno, just my thoughts.

    I'll throw this in too. Rio makes some sinkers in their Mainstream series. I'm not in love with their coatings, though I've had decent luck with their sinking lines. They're decent lines at $40 or $45 instead of $80+. I think they only make type 3 and type 6. I ended up getting them because no one seemed to want to make sinkers in 4 wts, and I wanted a fully-outfitted 4 wt set-up.

    Do note these don't come with welded tips. If you want loops in the ends and can't add your own (or know someone who can), you may need to pony up for high-end lines. Though with sinkers you can get away with nail-knotting in a permanent mono loop to the tip because you're almost always using short leaders and therefor rarely have to deal with the knot/loop hitting and hanging up on the guides when landing fish.
     
  2. Krusty

    Krusty Active Member

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    A poor college student, who refuses to rob banks, would benefit in equipping his leaders with tippet rings. Lets a tapered leader butt last a very long time, and provides fast and easy tippet change out for maximum terminal rig flexibility with a limited line/rod inventory.

    Go to stillwater set-up? Two rods, one rigged with floating line, the other with clear intermediate. I generally find the intermediate line most productive.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2017
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  3. Ian Horning

    Ian Horning Active Member

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    This is typically what I carry. I have the addition of a type 3 (will probably get a T5 when it breaks, it's getting old). The floating line is a superb choice for all-around versatility... you can throw indicators, which is the go-to way to rail fish for many guys here, you can throw streamers and nymphs with a 10-15 foot clear intermediate leader, or throw emergers and dries.

    Casting indicator rigs can be a pain in the butt, however I like knowing exactly where my flies are at in the water column. I like to be in control of as many variables as I can, so if you know that there are fish around and your flies are at the proper depth, you can mix it up until you find what they're willing to hit.
     
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  4. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    These days, I only fish stillwaters and have for decades. Compared to the other guys, my approach is quite simple.

    I use a SuperCat small size pontoon boat. I fish with one rod at a time and that is usually a 4 weight. If I'm fishing stillwater that also holds steelhead, I'll use a 5 weight.

    My primarily lines are a floating line, an intermediate sinking clear line and two different sink rates for full fast sinking lines. It's a toss up between the clear line and full fast sinking lines as to the one I use the most. The floating line is for fishing hatches or indicators.

    I have an old style Fishin' Buddy 120 I use to determine where the fish are holding. This helps me determine which sinking line to use when the trout are nowhere near the surface. I use the type 7 sinking line when the fish are holding near the bottom.

    I prefer using fluoro for my tippet material and will use long leaders for fishing subsurface. And when I say long leader/tippet, I mean 20 feet or more. The length of the leader/tippet is paramount to catching fish subsurface.

    When it comes to indicator fishing, I use them when nothing else is working. Actually, I use whatever helps me catch fish so I'm not dedicated to any technique. Usually my sinking lines will do the trick so most of the trout are catch are with one of the sinking lines.

    The vast majority of trout I catch are with WBs and leech patterns.

    I also fish for bass in stillwaters and that requires completely different lines and rods so I won't get into that now.

    These patterns have worked the most consistently for me over the years:

    Adams Woolly Bugger.jpg

    black and olive wb web.jpg

    black and olive seal bugger web.jpg



    black midge.jpg
    (in black, olive, red or tan)

    needs a name web.jpg

    johns green.jpg

    olive turbo leech web.jpg
    (in black, brown, olive, wine)

    olive and black best web.jpg
    (most consistent fish-catcher)
     
  5. Robert Engleheart

    Robert Engleheart Robert

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    Gene, when you say long leaders for subsurface work are you using them with sinking lines? I usually shorten mine to about 6’ with sinking lines. Maybe that’s why I don’t catch much :confused:
     
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  6. Buzzy

    Buzzy Active Member

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    I'm with you, Robert, except for the intermediate lines. I am almost always shorter than 6-feet on my full sinks but more than 9-feet on my two intermediates.... none of which are seeing water lately. :(
     
  7. camtheflyman

    camtheflyman New Member

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    It's interesting to hear how many ways one can be successful. I currently use tippet rings for most of my nymph/streamer fishing. I hear you can use it for dries with some floatant but I prefer not to as I think it'd still sink. From my understanding the consensus is that 1) I should invest in a fish finder 2)Indicators are a great way to fish nymphs without a sinking line as you can get them as deep as you need to 3)Fluorocarbon is the way to go for tippet 4)It would be good to have a T5 sinking line in the inventory to fish deep. Also, Rio's mainstream lines seem like a good choice but I believe scientific anglers make some that have a welded loop in the front for only 50 dollars. Is there any noticeable difference between these?
     
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  8. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Yes, I'm using very long leaders with any of the sinking lines. Instead of changing patterns I usually add tippet material instead. This tactic has worked for both me and my fishing buddies time and time again.

    When you're fishing subsurface the trout have a long time to investigate your pattern so it stands to reason that very long leader/tippet to keep the fly as far away as possible to the fly line is to your benefit. Try it. Instead of changing patterns, try adding tippet material. You may be pleasantly surprised.

    (I got this tip from Lefty Kreh when he was teaching a stillwater seminar.)
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2017
  9. Jiminsandiego

    Jiminsandiego Active Member

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    My first line was a Scientific Anglers "wet cell" sink 4. I like the way it cast but it would tangle up in the apron all the time. Finally tried an Airflo Sixth Sense Trout s3 and it was a joy to not have tangles. I bought it on Ebay for $50 new in the box, but because it does not have a welded loop, I think it's a few years old. I really like to use "Leader links" anyway. Also I like the tippet rings a lot. I'm a total newbie but a 9' 5wt with a leach or WB has been pretty darn effective. Great thread. I sure appreciate all the input on this subject.
     
  10. Jiminsandiego

    Jiminsandiego Active Member

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    Hey Gat. Those flies look great. I'm curious where you get them.
     
  11. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    He ties them.
     
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  12. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Yup.
     
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  13. Robert Engleheart

    Robert Engleheart Robert

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    Seems counterintuitive but I’ll try it, who am I to argue with Lefty
     
  14. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    Who are you not too? When did Lefty propose this idea, and how has technology changed since then? I've done both and I'll be honest, depending on your fly line and leader set up there really is no difference either way. The advantage of the shorter leader is knowing more accurately where your fly is in the water column if you do a count down method. If I'm marking fish at 30' and I have 12' of leader it is more difficult for me to count down my fly to the depth I want to fish using a type 5 or type 7 line. If I shorten that leader, it is easier to do so. I think that GAT mostly explores with his set up versus using a targeting technique and the longer leader in that case likely does not hinder the process.
     
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  15. Buzzy

    Buzzy Active Member

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    Totally agree ----^ I think sometimes that zone or water column, can be fairly "thin" and certainly not on bottom so knowing where you fly is can make all the difference.