golden trout / grayling

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by tbuss, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. Bill Reed

    Bill Reed Member

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    I must plead total ignorance as far as the availabilty of these species in the State of Washington, but if you ever get the chance, try the Wind Rivers in Wyoming for Goldens. Not only are they home to the current world record, they will provide more opportunties and larger fish than anywhere else on the planet. As far as Grayling, Meadow Lake on the west slopes of the Winds, Grebe Lake in Yellowstone and Horseshoe Lake in eastern Idaho are some of the best I know.
     
  2. Dan

    Dan Member

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    05Tacoma,

    In the day, I used to catch some really big grayling in Bavaria on the Isar River south of Munich. Didn't much appreciate them then, but I always loved the way they smelled - something like thyme. If the the mayor of Lenngries, or whoever holds the water rights now, invited me back to fish for grayling, I would be there in a flash!
     
  3. fishinmusician

    fishinmusician New Member

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    In northwest Montana there are at least four lakes with grayling that you can drive to. They are stocked by the state so you can even Bonk them if you want to see what the Thymus part of their name is about!
     
  4. dude_1967

    dude_1967 Chris

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    Dan, it's better than ever on the Upper Isar in Southern Germany. The river is managed by the fishing club in Lenggries. There are fishing / overnight packages starting at 55 €uro. It's C&R on grayling, the good 'ol boys shoot the cormorants, and the general fish population is about 75% grayling and 25% native browns.

    Visit: http://www.alpineangler.de/ and contact Andy Pfirstinger (or me). Click on the link "GEWÄSSER", meaning 'waters' and navigate to the Isar.

    The river is open until Halloween and the best time of the year (autumn) is coming up.

    Sincerely, Chris.

    :thumb:
     
  5. Dan

    Dan Member

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    Chris,

    This is pretty cool! What an amazing world we live in. I fished mostly up around the dinkmahl and in the flats below the bridge over to Lenngries. I was stationed at Bad Toelz at the time. The Post Commander and the mayor of Lenngries were hunting buddies, and we had a big get together at the Officer's Club. Afterward, our hosts decided to allow about 10 of us to fish. We were the first Americans that had been on the Isar in quite some time. I took the fishing instructor's course in Berchestgaden and then taught all our guys the rules. I used to frequent a fly shop in Bad Toelz. My German wasn't very good and neither was their English, but they sold me what I needed to catch fish. I mostly stayed on the upper part of the beat, but most of the other guys fished below the weir and caught a lot of trout. What wonderful memories. I may be in Europe in the late spring. I'll contact you if I make the trip and get down to Bavaria.

    Petri Heil,
     
  6. Tony Mull

    Tony Mull Member

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    Consider this: A ticket to Anchorage is about $250 RT. Rent a minivan (you can sleep in it) $450 for a week. Allow about another $400 for gas, grub and a lisence.
    Drive north and hit the Paxton Hwy and you can catch graying till you're sick of them. $1100. A little more than Montana, but not that much, and you're in Alaska! Or fly to Fairbanks instead and you can catch them right in town and stay in a hotel.
     
  7. Dan

    Dan Member

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    Tony,

    Good point. Of course there is a lot of sentimental value for me in knowing that I could fish that river again. I really started fly fishing for trout seriously at that point and was having some success - in between the grayling. I still have some of the flies that I used. It's also a truly beautiful place. I have a watercolor of the Isar River over my computer and I am looking at it as I type this. (Beside it is a watercolor of the Skagit Valley). Besides, women in Germany sunbathe in the nude in the great outdoors. I never knew what I was going to see around the next corner! (On the other hand, that might not be as interesting as it was for a lad of 20). I plan on spending the summer in Alaska when I retire in 5 years. I'll keep your pointers in mind.
     
  8. Tony Mull

    Tony Mull Member

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    you will find far fewer nude sunbathers in alaska and those you do see will have lots of these little red spots they continually scratch. however their skin, where its not red, will be a marvelous milky white.

    seriously, people don't realize how cheap alaska can be. if you split that car rental with a buddy you can spend less than $1000 for a week. for two you will have to pay the car rental guys $25 or so to take the seats out. for one you just turn them longways if they don't fold down. if you hit some salmon you can actually break even on the trip by bringing a cooler, or two, full of fillets home. there's more salmon filled coolers than luggage moving through the airport in anchorage in late july. those grayling school up so you can really catch and release till you don't want to any more.
     
  9. northstream

    northstream New Member

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    There is a reason there is only one lake in WA to catch grayling. To have a reproducing population, they like very clean granite gravel flushed with cold clear water for spawning and incubating their eggs. This one lake is the only place that has this type of spawning grounds where they've successfully taken hold. The hike in is so brutal and unmarked that not many people know how to get there or are willing to punish themselves with the long steep hike, which is good because this species can not take much fishing pressure with how small of a population is in there. Like most high lakes, you will get eaten alive by mosquitos once near the lakes. The grayling were planted back around 1947 from a Montana strain of grayling. Later on a pilot mistakingly also planted the lake with Montana black-spot cutthroat after confusing it on a map with another lake with the same name near the Skagit/Snohomish County border. I've been in there but do not recommend it to anyone else because of the trechorous and difficult hike to get in there and the ease of getting lost if you don't know where the trail is. It's not worth a day hike and is very strenuous when attempting to pack in fishing and camping gear. I've tried to take a few fellow fly fishers in there who I thought could make it and just about killed them trying to get them there. Unfortunately several years ago the logging road going in there was gated down below to prevent people from driving 4x4's up to the washouts so the hike has been made even tougher. If you really want to catch a grayling, I'd recommend chosing Alaska or Montana.
     
  10. Caveman

    Caveman Member

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    I have been there and it is a long ass hike, I mean long. You need a boat to fish it also because the banks are too steep to fish to include trees and brush. Beautiful lake but a bitch to get to. It tooi me two trips in there to get there, got lost the first time and finally made it the second time.

     
  11. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    Doesn't anybody check the dates on these old posts. This one is almost 6 years old. Most people move on after a few years.
     
  12. Pete Bridge

    Pete Bridge Member

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    Hiking in to Granite lakes was more difficult than climbing Rainier, I shit you not. As previously stated, route finding is a major issue too.
     
  13. CC898

    CC898 Member

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    A phoenix rising for sure! To add a note, I have all intentions of chasing a few Goldens in MT this year! Beartooth plateau alpine lakes here I come!
     
  14. bakerite

    bakerite Active Member

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    There are some lakes in NW Montana with some good sized grayling. Rogers by Kalispell and Handkerchief (spelling ?) by Hungry Horse reservoir both have some nice fish. There are other lakes over in that neck of the woods with smaller fish.
     
  15. fly-by

    fly-by Active Member

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    There is a drive-to lake near Show Low, AZ that had lots of nice sized Grayling when I fished it. Unfortunately it's been 16 years and I forgot the name. This lake also had Apache trout. If you go through the old WDFW stocking reports you can see Golden plants within the last few years.