Handgun advice

Discussion in 'Cast & Blast' started by Flyborg, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. nathanj

    nathanj New Member

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    There was a recent case in Arizona where a man shot and killed another man who was supposedly coming after him on a trail. The shooter felt he was justified and that his life in danger. Weather or not he was justified I'm not sure, but one of the key pieces of evidence that convicted the shooter was the exact statement you just made, "Can't sue if he's dead". If you ever do find yourself in a situation like that be very careful what you say. I think the guy is now doing 15 years hard time at 50+ years old. I'll try and find the article and put up a link.

     
  2. nathanj

    nathanj New Member

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  3. David Prutsman

    David Prutsman All men are equal before fish

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    iagree
     
  4. jcalderon

    jcalderon Member

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    A JUNGLE NEAR YOU
    If you are over 60...... go with a revolver......... If not, and you dont mind a few moving parts, I carry a hk usp compact 9mm. Simply put, new generation semi autos are just as reliable as revolvers, however, oldtimers will stick to the addage that fewer complexities equals better performance. Not true! Ive had my usp in the icy rivers, desert sun, sand, mud (a am a jeep nut) just about anywhere you can imagine. It has over 4,000 rounds thorugh it and still shoots like the day I bought it. You wont find better than HK
     
  5. Cliff

    Cliff Member

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    I agree with Roper, and I've settled on a S&W Centennial for just about all of my outdoor activities.
    I have all manner of handguns from .22 to .44mag, semi-autos & revolvers, and this one just seems to work best for me. I use it for backpacking, hiking, fishing, etc. It fits into my fly vest very well and if I remove the oversized rubber stocks and install the tiny original S&W wood stocks it's a very small package. I run five 125gr +P Hyrdashocks, and I do sometimes load it with Glazers as the first two rounds in the cylinder. I sometimes bring a spare speedloader along, too.

    Cliff
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Davy

    Davy Active Member

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    well, it ain't light, but I shoulder a Springfield .40. Seems it would hopefully do the trick. But again, it ain't light
     
  7. obiwankanobi

    obiwankanobi Active Member

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    I love my Glock .45 caliber. After a sticky situation with a drunk on the river one time, I now carry a visible sidearm. With a 10 round loaded clip, it is heavy but it adds that extra protection when I am alone. Besides when the fishing is slow, I take out the frustration on rotted tree stumps and all small woodland creatures scatter...Ha ha!
     
  8. John Hicks

    John Hicks Owner and operator of Sea Run Pursuits

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    I was just wondering, but when was the last report of a human being attacked by either bear or cougar in Washington? As for the meth heads I have first hand experience with that and a well placed shot of pepper spray in the face sure as hell will turn any meth head. I love guns and own quite a few but I preffer pepper spray in the woods.
     
  9. Cliff

    Cliff Member

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    John, I know animal/human conflicts are really pretty rare in the boonies. I rarely pack a handgun for animals, with the exception of my annual week long trips to Montana every July (and I'm thinking about switchng to bear spray). Most of the times when I'm packing it's around lowland country, basically anywhere around humans. The Pinnacle Lake case is tragic and very disturbing, especially since I'm a hiker and high lakes fisherman, but it is extremely unusual. I'm not going to go into the story here, but a buddy and I were deliberately shot at while on a fishing trip back in 1993, on the road from Conunully to Fish Lake. These were multiple gunshots aimed directly at us, from what we later discovered was a .44 magnum. It was a very scary situation where we hid in the woods waiting for the shooter to walk up on us. I was unarmed at the time and I will never allow myself to be in that position again.

    I could have used bear spray last summer while fishing some high lakes near Tonga Ridge. My buddy and I had a bear or bears coming into our camp all night. They would take off when we got up and screamed at them. It made me nervous, though.

    Cliff
     
  10. cuponoodle breakfast

    cuponoodle breakfast la flama blanca

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    Not always. Some people aren't all that bothered by it.
     
  11. Mike T

    Mike T Active Member

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    You've got to let the meth head within about 10'-15' for that to happen. I'd question that judgement. A police study showed that a knife wielding assailant can close a 20' space and stab within 1.5 seconds. That's faster than most can draw and fire from an exposed holster. Now try doing that from a concealed holster. Same goes for pepper spray or bear spray in one of those nylon "holsters" that are sold. Bottom line is be aware of your surroundings because if an assailant, human or otherwise, gets within 20-30 feet of you your choices are very limited and not at all good.
     
  12. David Prutsman

    David Prutsman All men are equal before fish

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    iagree

    Your head should be your first defense, be alert to your surroundings, don't become complacent. Training is key, in a stressful situation people revert to habits (good and bad) learned in training. Put yourself into certain situations before they happen so you don't have to think about what actions to take.

    There is a great book called "The Best Defense", about real people who defended themselves and others with firearms. There are even stories of people who were anti-firearms and are only alive today because of one. It answers the question, "why do you need a gun"?
     
  13. scottr

    scottr Active Member

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    This was a pretty widely distributed story about an angler that was attacked by a cougar on the Kalama.

    http://wdfw.wa.gov/do/newreal/release.php?id=may0703a

    Here is some information on bear and cougar attacks in WA.

    http://www.wdfw.wa.gov/wlm/game/cougbear.htm
     
  14. Jason Mauk

    Jason Mauk New Member

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    I know this is an old thread, but thought I would respond. I am a LEO and issued an H&K USP compact .40 for duty. I trust and rely on the gun, but would not purchase one for the purposes the original poster wants it for. If you want a gun you can pull out of saltwater and go bang, get a Glock.
     
  15. Smooth

    Smooth Guest

    Lots of good advice out there, some not so good.
    I carry a great revolver, the Taurus M444. It is a titanium frame .44 mag, steel chamber and barrel liner. With a 4" barrel it weighs in at 29oz unloaded, which is less than a quart of water (32oz plus the bottle). It is also reasonably accurate, not like a rifle, but good for a 4" barrel handgun.
    It has a great grip that makes it one of the nicer .44s to shoot. I've shot Airlites and Mountain lites (S&W), Ruger Blackhawks, and a host of others and I can say the Taurus if more manageable with its energy absorbing grip. Of course, grips can be changed on most side arms.
    If recoil bothers you, shoot .44 special rounds. They still have more energy than a .38 or a .40

    For the woods and mountains I'd go .44 unless you are trying to conceal it, then that is a different situation alltogether and you're not really worried about cougar or bear then, are you?
    That's m' story and I am sticking to it.