Heddon Bamboo Info?

Discussion in 'Bamboo, Fiberglass & Classic Reels' started by Dan Soltau, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    7 weight! Perfect, I will try it with streamers on friday on the madison! I am pretty excited about this, and also about the fact that the other one seems to be similar in size to the red one, meaning I have two bamboo 7 weights, and 2 winston 7 weights! Best of both worlds I guess... Sweet, and thanks for all the info!
     
  2. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    It's worth remembering that almost all vintage (1930s through 1960s) bamboo rods were designed to throw an HDG or 6wt line. Grangers were about the only 'lightline' production rods, rated for a 5wt. Orvis, who built hundreds of thousands of high-quality cane rods, didn't introduce their first 4wt models until the mid-1970s (the Nymph and the 4-3). Same was true of fiberglass, even through the 1970s.

    As a rule of thumb, if you have a cane rod from that era, it's most likely designed for a 6wt line. As Tim said earlier, in respect to the elderly, DO NOT overline an old cane rod.

    K
     
  3. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    Well, that seems odd that they would make all rods for 6 wt lines? My grandparents have dozen of rods, and they have some really small, light rods and some boos that were for tarpon fishing. This rod seems pretty beastly, maybe even an 8 wt.
    Kent,
    If you dont think I should fish a rio deep seven sinking line on it because it could cause problems with the rod, then I wont.... or did you just mean that about the gold one?
     
  4. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    There were the odd 'fairy wands' occasionally made during that period, but they were usually fairly short (5-6'), intended for eastern limestone creeks and somewhat rare.

    Not sure if you're kidding or not about the Deep 7, but in case you aren't, I sure as heck wouldn't put a heavy line like that on a vintage rod unless you don't mind spending money to have someone repair the damage it may cause.

    Here's an example: a couple years ago I scored a beautiful Granger 9' 9050 3-piece rod from the early 1950s. It appeared to be fished only lightly as everything was in near mint condition. Tim and I spent a few days east of the mountains and ended up at Dry Falls where I christened the Granger. After no success up top, I switched lines to a uniform sink 6wt which eventually produced my only fish of the day. At the end of the day though, the top section of the Granger was pretty severly bent in a compound set caused by a day's casting with a heavier line than the 5wt the rod was intended for.

    I later took the rod to Ray Gould who pronounced it the finest Granger he'd ever seen and the worst set he'd ever been asked to repair. A week and $25 later, I vowed to be extra careful with it and my other vintage cane rods. Wondering how just a single weight overline could cause so much damage, I put the sinking line on a scale where it measured out at about a 7.5wt.

    The moral of this story is overline your grandpa's old rod at your peril.

    K
     
  5. herl

    herl Member

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    MOST of the rods were for 5/6 weight line, but your heddon #2 1/2 F should be fine with a 7wt. line. Heddon also made rods with other weight designations (i'm not sure what years they started that). There are rods with #00 F to #3 F designations (describes the ferrule size) that are sort of Heddon's way of rating the action/line weight of the rods (the lower the F#, the lighter the rod, generally the more desireable).

    Big Skeels, If that #10 you are looking at has the F# written on it, that would be a big help with determining its value- along with the length of the rod (and if any sections are broken/repaired).
     
  6. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    So should I use it with the sinking line or not?
     
  7. herl

    herl Member

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    I don't know anything about that line, but if it is the same grain weight as a 7wt. floater- then I don't see why not. (make sure you actually check the weight though b/c often sinking lines weigh more than floaters of the same AFTMA designation).
     
  8. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Was me, I'd start with a 5wt or 6wt floater and get comfortable with the rod and its action before anything else. Since we're not sure what weight line either rod was designed for, I'd steer well clear of using a Rio Deep Seven on it.

    K