Help me out!! I need some coho love

#16
I too am relatively new to Coho/King fishing although I have fished PInks over the years, so I'd consider myself a relative newby too. I've been lucky this year and caught several Shakers or Residents and 2 nice ~7lb hatchery keepers all from the beach. It seems to still be a little early, just a few fish here and there from what I've seen. One thing seems to be consistent though: I catch fish when I see salmon activity on the surface and don't when there isn't (even if its just the occasional random jumper). Went out the last two mornings and there was a ton of bait on the surface but no sign of any salmon.

I've been fishing primarily the intermediate with a 8 or so foot 12lb leader although I've had luck with a floating line and a 10' sink tip add-on and a little longer leader. Pink clousers with a trailing hook have treated me well this year. And all the talk about cast length...both my keepers came within 20 feet of shore; one early morning and one mid-morning when the sun was already up. I watched a gear guy the other day catch one literally at his feet, hilarious watching him unwrap the mess around his feet! I also vary my stripping like was mentioned above. I see some guys setting their rods on their stripping baskets and stripping as fast as they can with two hands, don't know if that's necessary but I'm still new... One thing I've been told too is to keep stripping if you feel a hit until you are confident you are hooked up, sometimes they'll keep chasing after a miss. And definitely check your hook often, all too easy to damage the hook on back-casts.

Stick with it, you'll start to figure it out. Its addicting once you hook into a big fish! Maybe I'll see you down at LP one of these days-
 

DimeBrite

MA-9 Beach Stalker
#17
When you hook a silver, they all seem to have different personalities. First off, they hit the fly a million different ways. Sometimes it's so soft you barely notice until it is too late. Other times it's a peck peck. My favorite is the hard strike and immediate hook-up or the SLAM. Once hooked most silvers will start head shaking and you can see them flashing in the water. The hot silvers will immediately run straight out making a series of jumps (the best). Most silvers will head shake for a few seconds, then immediately swim directly into shore straight at you (causing a loss of tension). You must reel, strip, and run backwards as fast as possible to maintain tension or you will quickly lose the fish. As soon as I hook-up I move up onto the beach so I can get the fish on the reel faster and am able to react quicker with my feet. When the fish hits shallow water, it will quickly turn around and shoot straight out into open water like a bullet (and maybe jump). Let it run! Don't horse the fish, just let it work against your reel. Some silvers will run in close to the beach then zoom left or right in shallow water taking your line behind the legs of other anglers (you must chase these down while yelling "look out big fish"). The bigger silvers over 7 pounds don't always react to getting hooked immediately. They'll swim deep with the fly in their mouth before they make a move (not coming to the surface like most silvers). Be careful, the big guy is planning something scary that usually involves you having to run (so get ready). While fighting the fish manage your line carefully. Strip into your basket, not onto the ground. Get the fly line on the reel, but don't lose focus on the fish while doing so (many salmon are lost when guys are preoccupied with getting slack line onto the reel). Chinook/blackmouth on the fly rod are quite different. They hit pretty hard and will go on hard runs straight out from the beach and take you into your backing pretty fast. Chinook also have more endurance than silvers, with the fight lasting 5-10 minutes or longer.


This is all super helpful, and brings up a good point--what the hell should I expect should I be so lucky as to hook one?
Lots of head shaking? Blistering runs? Hunkering down?
 
#18
Damn, Dimebrite, you just got me so stoked to catch one of these guys.

I'm going to the beach right now. What the hell.

Tight lines fellas.

Jason

When you hook a silver, they all seem to have different personalities. First off, they hit the fly a million different ways. Sometimes it's so soft you barely notice until it is too late. Other times it's a peck peck. My favorite is the hard strike and immediate hook-up or the SLAM. Once hooked most silvers will start head shaking and you can see them flashing in the water. The hot silvers will immediately run straight out making a series of jumps (the best). Most silvers will head shake for a few seconds, then immediately swim directly into shore straight at you (causing a loss of tension). You must reel, strip, and run backwards as fast as possible to maintain tension or you will quickly lose the fish. As soon as I hook-up I move up onto the beach so I can get the fish on the reel faster and am able to react quicker with my feet. When the fish hits shallow water, it will quickly turn around and shoot straight out into open water like a bullet (and maybe jump). Let it run! Don't horse the fish, just let it work against your reel. Some silvers will run in close to the beach then zoom left or right in shallow water taking your line behind the legs of other anglers (you must chase these down while yelling "look out big fish"). The bigger silvers over 7 pounds don't always react to getting hooked immediately. They'll swim deep with the fly in their mouth before they make a move (not coming to the surface like most silvers). Be careful, the big guy is planning something scary that usually involves you having to run (so get ready). While fighting the fish manage your line carefully. Strip into your basket, not onto the ground. Get the fly line on the reel, but don't lose focus on the fish while doing so (many salmon are lost when guys are preoccupied with getting slack line onto the reel). Chinook/blackmouth on the fly rod are quite different. They hit pretty hard and will go on hard runs straight out from the beach and take you into your backing pretty fast. Chinook also have more endurance than silvers, with the fight lasting 5-10 minutes or longer.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#19
You've received some great advice. The best way to learn is to spend as much time as you can on the water. Soon you'll begin to see patterns develop as to which beaches fish best during certain tide phases. Make note of those because those same tides will keep rewarding you.
Most important to me is fishing moving water. If the water isn't moving, your chances at success go way down. Fish rips, choppy water etc. If the rip dies out and forms somewhere else on the beach, move to the new rip. I see tons of people fishing frog water. You'll catch an occasional fish there, but nothing like you will out of moving water.
Learning to read a tide chart well really helps. Look at the exchange in feet and how long it takes for that exchange to happen. Divide the feet by the time to get the feet per hour exchange. Again, you'll start seeing patterns develop based on the exchange rate. I like to fish early possible, but I'd rather sleep in and fish a good afternoon tide in bright sunlight then a lousy tide with little movement in the morning.
Keep at it, because you'll have a lot of fun when it all comes together.
Good luck,
SF
 

DKL

Nude to the board
#20
If you said you had been out 30 times, maybe it would seem a little more reasonable to be frustrated. But only 3 times out, you just need to be a little more patient. To me, this kind of fishing is a volume game, kind of like fishing for steel. The more you get out and do it, the more likely you are to get one. Just remember these fish are on the move, and you have to be out a lot to improve the likelihood that you'll be there when they are. I fish that beach quite a bit, maybe I'll see you out there one of these days, just look for the guy shaking his head and mumbling to himself after each crappy cast.

DKL
 

porterHause

Just call me Jon
#21
Jason,

I'm tying up some flies tonight and hitting LP tomorrow morning. If you're there, say hello to the dude with the camo hat trying to figure it out the same as you are. Maybe we can compare notes.

DKL, you're not being specific enough. You just described me to the 'T'.
 
#22
One other thing I don't think was mentioned was that while these fish are in the salt, they are moving through quickly. You are fishing blindly to rips, currents, and fishing lanes in hopes that there is a fish there. They seem to be moving in small schools of five or six from what I have seen this years and at about twenty minute intervals, at least on the beach that I fish regularly. They are in about six feet of water and around 60 to 70 feet off shore, depending on the lay of the beach. Best to hit that beach at low tide sometime and check the structure so you have an idea of where the fish might be. Then you have a better chance but sometimes, they just aren't there. You have to keep at it to be successful.
 
#23
Jason,

I'm tying up some flies tonight and hitting LP tomorrow morning. If you're there, say hello to the dude with the camo hat trying to figure it out the same as you are. Maybe we can compare notes.

DKL, you're not being specific enough. You just described me to the 'T'.
Hey Porter,

I think I pulled in behind you this morning--I was driving the Vanagon. Sorry we didn't get a chance to chat more. At least you got yourself a fish this morning, eh?;)

Hopefully I'll see you again and we can meet properly.

On another note, I did see Jimmy from Patrick's fly shop get one on the other side of the point. And some gear fishers pulled out 4 or 5. The wind was absolutely killer over there though.

Jason
 

porterHause

Just call me Jon
#24
Ahaha, it was a monster starry flounder, felt just a little bit better than pulling in that extra large clump of salad.

Was this action you speak of after the tide change? I checked out the north side of the point on my way out, and saw one fish on shore at around 745.

Wind was even worse in the afternoon. I ended up buzz bombing...hooked and lost one.
 
#26
Hey Porter,

I think I pulled in behind you this morning--I was driving the Vanagon. Sorry we didn't get a chance to chat more. At least you got yourself a fish this morning, eh?;)

Hopefully I'll see you again and we can meet properly.

On another note, I did see Jimmy from Patrick's fly shop get one on the other side of the point. And some gear fishers pulled out 4 or 5. The wind was absolutely killer over there though.

Jason
Hey Jason-

I was in the silver truck yesterday morning, I think you came in behind me. Any luck? I was fishing the point just south of the Spey guy, had 2 nice fish jump in front of me early on but never saw anything the rest of the morning.

Brooks
 

porterHause

Just call me Jon
#27
Brooks,

You the southpaw? If so, I'm thinking the lineup was spey guy, you, me, Jason. Just trying to put names and faces to you folks.

I'm going to try to head out this afternoon, but I have a "client appreciation BBQ" to go to...joy.
 
#28
Nice. Awesome to meet you guys on here. I'll be sure and say hello next time I'm at LP.

I think Bob Young was out there--the older fellow wandering around with a wading staff (at least I'm pretty sure it was him). He came up and complimented me on my casting, which was pretty cool and humbling. I thought I was casting like shit yesterday morning, but if a local expert comes up and says great job, I'll take it!

See you guys out there next week, for sure.

Jason
 

holtad

Active Member
#29
I've been out there Tuesday and today (Thursday) and I'm a South Paw:) The gear guy (with a red back pack) was to my left both days and he's hooked up with a fish each day. Still cutting my teeth at this beach thing but I love being out for Sunrise. Next on the agenda is to get a stripping basket.

Love to hear how the afternoon tide change goes.

~Adam
 
#30
I've been out there Tuesday and today (Thursday) and I'm a South Paw:) The gear guy (with a red back pack) was to my left both days and he's hooked up with a fish each day. Still cutting my teeth at this beach thing but I love being out for Sunrise. Next on the agenda is to get a stripping basket.

Love to hear how the afternoon tide change goes.

~Adam
Go guerilla/diy style and snatch a shopping basket from Safeway or QFC or some other big store that won't miss it. You can slip a belt right through it and you're all set!

Just kidding...kind of.