Help Please! (SRC)

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by Anyfish, Jan 18, 2006.

  1. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

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    It should also be kept in mind that when fishing for coastal cutthroat we are fishing for wild fish that aren't present in nearly the numbers that you'll find in a hatchery driven situation such as when a lot of young resident coho are present.
    In fact, coastal cutthroat in south Puget Sound are still in a recovery mode from when sportsmen lobbied to get them declared catch-and-release in 1997 (when they were in severe decline). Many of their spawning creeks are not in the best condition to be condusive to high spawning success. In addition, coastal cutthroat grow very slowly; and 18-incher may be up to ten years old.
    As has been stated on this thread, there is a lot to learn to become a regularly successful coastal cutthroat fisherman. It is not a stacked deck like we might experience in an annually stocked lowland lake. Learn about your quarry, its envronment, its habits and remember that the coastal cutthroat is highly mobile during its time in saltwater. They may be at a beach one day and gone the next.
    As you concentrate more on learning about the fish and the fishing; the catching will eventually begin taking care of itself.
    Good Fishing,
    Les Johnson
     
  2. RedFive

    RedFive Active Member

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    No dude, YOU'RE the man. The pictures say it all, right? You up for fishing again this weekend? I think we're heading out Saturday afternoon...
     
  3. miyawaki

    miyawaki Active Member

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  4. willieboat

    willieboat Member

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    One tip, don't wade too deep when hunting SRC's.

    Don
     
  5. Roger Stephens

    Roger Stephens Active Member

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    Sent you a PM but not sure if it got mailed. So if you didn't get it, I'll send you another.

    Keeping a detailed journal will greatly increase your success rate when fishing for SRC. Record what part of the tide you are fishing and amount of current. SRC like to site on the edge of current seams in the "softer" water and are not usually in "heavy" current unless they are feeding on baitfish which are being swept along by the current. SRC have a tendency to stay "put" along current seams and the down current side of gravel bars as they sit and wait for a "meal" to come by. So check out the areas that you are fishing to see what the bottom structure is like during a low tide. Even small depressions will allow SRC to easily hold on the bottom which is usually where they like to "sit" since there is less current there. Note all this in your journal so that over time you hopefully can determine which part of the beach has the best fishing and what part of the tide.

    A couple of gravel bars which I fish have nice current swepting across them on both the ebb and flood tides. You would think that they would fish about the same on either tide. But some gravels bars fish better on the ebb tide while others fish better on the flood tide. Note that in your journal.

    keeping a journal stimulates you to be observant and is invalueable sometimes in determing patterns/trends of SRC and over time helps to establish the time of year various locations fish best. It takes some effort to get in the routine but it will pay off for your in the long run if a person is serious about fly fishing for SRC on Puget Sound.

    Roger
     
  6. espja

    espja Member

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    Redfive,
    I'll give you a call Friday.
     
  7. wet line

    wet line New Member

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    Knowledge is the key. Les Johnson's newest book Flyfishing Coastal Cutthroat Trout is a must read whether you are new to the SRC's or fished them for years. A lot of what has been posted here is in the book and a lot more. Once your knowledge base begins to expand read the book again and you will find even more data to aid in the search for the elusive sea trout.

    I cann't thank Les enough for his latest book. Well maybe I should be upset because it will aid so many people in becoming better SRC fishers :)

    Dave
     
  8. Anyfish

    Anyfish Fishing with the kids

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    Thanks for the replies.:thumb:
     
  9. troutingham

    troutingham Member

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    how old is a 25 inch src???
     
  10. Les Johnson

    Les Johnson Les Johnson

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    Troutingham,
    You may never see a 25-inch coastal cutthroat in the salt, if that is your question. They top out at around 20-22 inches and can be between 10 and 12 years old. And searun cutthroat of this size are rare. The occasional searun coastal cutthroat that reaches 25-inches can be a cutthroat /steelhead hybrid. Conversely, coastal cutthroat in large lakes (Washington, Buttle, etc.) can reach double digits in weight and considerable length.
    Check my book "Fly Fishing Coastal Cutthroat Trout" out of the libarary and read up on these fish. There are no easy answers for most of the questions that often appear in the threads on bulletin boards. They are indeed a wild and mysterious trout.
    Les Johnson
     
  11. RedFive

    RedFive Active Member

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    Gee Paul, I guess that monster cutthroat you caught last year might not have been a cuttie at all. At least, that's what the man says. Don't worry, I still believe you. :D

    After all, I saw several 18+ inch cutthroat and a few 20+ ones landed a week or so ago, so I think it's still possible. Where have you been fishing, BTW? PM me when you get a chance.

    I wonder how long the state record was--it was 6 lbs, so it must have been bigger than 20".
     
  12. Anyfish

    Anyfish Fishing with the kids

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    I guess I would be happy with a 20+ fish.........just kidding, I would be happy with any.