Hybrid rods?

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Kent Lufkin, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. wolverine

    wolverine Member

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    The G Loomis GL 2 rod series is a graphite/fiberglass blend. Tough as nails and cast well. A bit on the heavy side.
     
  2. Tom Bowden

    Tom Bowden Active Member

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    Hybrid rods aren't really new. I built an 8-1/2' 6wt. back in the 1970's, using one of the first blanks made by Sage. Dave Shoff told me the blank was a blend of graphite and s-glass, and was the first real medium-action graphite rod. A lot of us that learned to fish with glass and bamboo didn't like the stiff actions of the initial graphite rods, and the Sages were a real revelation.

    Tom
     
  3. Chad Lewis

    Chad Lewis NEVER wonder what to do with your free time

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    Hardy are making a new line of fiberglass rods; they're being marketed as small stream rods. The blanks are mainly fiberglass, with 10% graphite to help control tip bounce and aid overall recovery. Sounds like a cool idea. I'd like to cast one, but they weren't at the Bellevue show :mad:
     
  4. rebeason

    rebeason New Member

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    The Fenwick Streamer Fly Rods made in Taiwan were fiberglass/hybrid composites,(according to phone conversation with Fenwick) my 2 pc, 9', 6wt (SF906-2) weighs 3 1/4 oz, and has an action like a fast bamboo or fiberglass. I bought it thinking it was graphite, but action gave it away.
     
  5. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Thanks for your first post to WFF and for dredging up one of my old threads! Looking forward to reading more from you. Welcome aboard!

    K
     
  6. Chad Lewis

    Chad Lewis NEVER wonder what to do with your free time

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    Uhhh, I actually bought one of those Hardys....
     
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  7. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    And ?????
     
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  8. Rob Allen

    Rob Allen Active Member

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    Umm whole lot of lack of knowledge going on here...


    Most of the best rods on the planet today are made from graphites with fiberglass scrim.

    the modulus of a carbon material has no bearing whatsoever on it's quality of the quality of the rods manufactured from it.

    a fast action rod does not require high modulus material.

    everyone wants fast action rods why? because fast action means high line speed. a fast rod however does not have to be stiff. it can be very flexible and still respond quickly yes even fiberglass! even people who think they like slow action rods typically don't! they like flexible rods not slow ones. no one wants slow rods they want rods that develop high line speed with minimal effort and the good feel of a deep flexing rod.

    at least I have never met anyone who liked slow action rods.
     
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  9. Lugan

    Lugan Joe Streamer

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    This is a great observation. I love fiberglass rods. I have more than a dozen in 8'0" and under, and in fact 100% of my rods in that range of lengths are glass. They are clearly slower than graphite in terms of flex. But their recovery speed after loading in a cast is not actually all that slow.

    BTW, there are a few people who like truly slow rods on the Fiberglass Flyrodders and Clark's Classic Fly Rods forums, plus a lot of fly fishermen in Japan. I'm not one of them.
     
  10. Chad Lewis

    Chad Lewis NEVER wonder what to do with your free time

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    And I like it. I bought it mainly for dry fly fishing. After having it for awhile, I'm not so sure that slow rods are as forgiving as people think. Maybe it's Hardys in particular, but you have to be spot-on with your casting to make the thing work. Compared to faster actions, it's a more demanding rod to cast. It's definitely made my casting better because of how much attention you have give it.
     
  11. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    Interesting....sounds opposite of what I found. You describe my feelings when I cast my 6 weight TCR. I definitely pay more attention to it. It is less forgiving with minor casting errors as opposed to my slower rods. I feel I don't need to be perfect and can recoup from errors with those rods but with the TCR it demands your timing be on and line speed is always 'game on'. Thanks for sharing.
     
  12. Lugan

    Lugan Joe Streamer

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    In my experience, it's rods at either end of the quickness spectrum that are less forgiving, though in vastly different ways.

    Like Porter, I once owned a TCR that I found to be very unforgiving of timing errors. The problem with avoiding timing errors on such a stiff rod is that you often can't feel the line load unless you really have a lot of line out and boost line speed dramatically. If your casting stroke is too relaxed, it's hard to make a rod like a TCR work.

    I have also owned a few slow glass rods. When I mean slow glass, I don't mean all glass - I mean the slowest of the slow like the Lamiglas "honey" series. Those rods are unforgiving of putting too much force into your cast or they just collapse at the tip. This both saps energy out of the cast and causes the tip trajectory to go into an arc instead of staying flat, and the result is a pile of fly line 10 feet in front of you instead of a sweet cast 30 feet out. Many beginners and impatient anglers would have a hard time with those kinds of rods.
     
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  13. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    didn't the tfo bluewater rod have a fiberglass butt for lifting and a graphite tip for casting?
     
  14. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    Still do.
     
  15. Porter

    Porter Active Member

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    Lugan, I don't believe I have casted one of those slower of the slow rods yet, but what you laid out makes sense.