I have a Sage BASS rod.....

Discussion in 'Warm Water Species' started by Chad Lewis, Feb 20, 2009.

  1. XstreamAngler

    XstreamAngler ...has several mistresses.

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  2. colton rogers

    colton rogers wishin' i was fishin'

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    bass like cover so a popper drug over a downed tree would be good or a wooly bugger stripped in by trees {over hanging or in the water} rocks, pads, docks would all be good places, or any trout streamer would do. you won't want heavily weights flies b/c alot of times bass will be interested but when you stop your lure they decide to strike.

    what rod do you have b/c i was looking at the bluegill version, do you like your rod
     
  3. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    I would recommend havin some deceiver style flies, a few crawdads along with a black, charteuse, and maybe even a white and red popper, all with weed guards if possible. With bass, especially big bass, you will need to use a strip set to set the hook, rather than the rod as a fly rod will absorb to much of the weight and prevent the hook from penetrating. Very frustrating.
    All I can say is that I love to bass fish, in fact the only guide trips I pay for are for bass every spring. In the past, I used conventional tackle and was heavy into the whole BASS and what not. For the past few years though, I go strictly fly. I will say that I would enjoy gettin after them with a soft plastic or jig if the topwater bite is off!
    I have had the opportunity to get after them on lake fork in texas, which was one of the first trophy lakes in the country to have a slot limit. It was also one of the f
    first lakes to be thought of "as a catch and release" largemouth lake by all its anglers. There are over 300 plus guides who work this lake, but until recently it didnt hold any tournaments because of the slot limit. I have done more fishing on it with gear, but a lot with the fly rod as well. The most fish and biggest fish I have caught in a period of time has been with a fly rod in perfect conditions in the spring time in shallow water. Unfortunately, conditions dont always call for these tactics, so this is where a fly rodder is out. If there is anyway to do it, I would think you have a couple carolina rigs, a couple texas rigs, a crankbait setup, a spinnerbait setup, a 1 ounce jig setup for mats and super heavy cover, and a couple FLY RODS. One with a heavy fly, one with a shad like baitfish, and a popper rod.
    I remember the first day I fished on lake fork with the fly, between my buddy and I we landed 14 fish, with 8 over 5 lbs. Before lunch and all on topwater. I guess that was fishing rubbing it in, because I had fished there a week a year for 5 plus years with conventional tackle and I dont know that I had even caught 14 total! Of course, that is the best day I have out there so far, but it just goes to show that it can be done. You should have seen the conventional tackle guys who were fishing nearby. "How come yall are usin trout rods, this is bass?" On most days, a conventional angler has a much better chance of winning a tournament because you can fish depths from 1 to 60 feet. Plus the reels they use are at like 10:1 retrieve ratio, and they land fish in less than 5 seconds 90% of the time. As far as the boats are concerned, if you entered a tournament in a canoe on gigantic southern lake with 2 foot swells when there is hint of wind, there is no way you would compete. They have the ability to cover water in a way that unbelievably effective, often runs of 1-2 hours 60+ miles each way. What if you could do that on the madison during the salmonfly hatch? Exactly.
    I think it is highly possible that a fly rod will find its way in there, or at least flies themselves, and may even become a common way of fishing shallow water.
    Here is my biggest, 9lbs 3 ounces. On a popper!
     

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  4. Chad Lewis

    Chad Lewis NEVER wonder what to do with your free time

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    Colton, I have the Smallmouth rod. Haven't put a fish on it yet, but I spent some time on the water this weekend practicing with it. First thing I noticed is that I have to keep the backcast up! Using 9' and longer rods all the time has obviously made me lazy. Not the rod's fault, and easily fixed. I started working on the skip cast, and after about fifteen minutes could do a weak imitation of one. More practice needed. As for the rod, it works as advertised. Did all the casting with a 1/0 deer hair Dahlberg Diver. It'll throw that fly around with no problem- all the weight concentrated in the front of the line turns it over easily. I built a leader with 55-40-30-20 pound material, with a 15lb tippet. Whole leader is about 9'. Seems to work well, I'll try some lighter tippets later and see if they'll turn over. Action on the rod is great. I cast it at the show in Bellevue, and it seems to want a faster casting stroke than I originally thought, but it's still not as fast as, say, my G Loomis 6wt GLX. It does need some muscle though. About 25 minutes of straight casting (not any retrieving and fishing) and my arm/shoulder were starting to get tired. I suppose there's no way around that with the heavy line and stiff rod, not to mention casting flies that could eat a small trout. It is as accurate as any of my other rods. It does what it was made to do, and well.

    I didn't cast the Bluegill rod at the show. I did cast the Largemouth, and it was the same as the Smallmouth, but on steroids. I'd think that the Bluegill would be more of the same, except on a diet. Honestly, I'm not sure what you'd use the Bluegill for. I suppose casting fairly big flies to fish that are not that big (relatively). I suppose it would be a good trout rod on the right occasion. If it's like I think it is, maybe it's overkill for fishing bluegill. Then again, I didn't cast it so I don't really know. Sage's literature says it's for smaller bass and for panfish, as well as the ultimate "bugger chucker" for big trout. The difference in line weight for the Large and Smallmouth is 40 grains, with the Bluegill 60 grains lighter than the Smallmouth; so maybe it is quite a bit lighter than mine. It just hit me! Casting poppers for sea run cutthroat! Would probably be perfect for that. Anyway, let me know what you have in mind.
     
  5. Chad Lewis

    Chad Lewis NEVER wonder what to do with your free time

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    XstreamAngler- true 'dat. I can only hope to get some that size. Maybe you could show me where? :thumb:

    Dan- that's a big 'ole bass! Bass fishing in Texas is probably a lot like San Diego, CA. The fish have all year to eat and grow. Plus, a lot of the reservoirs in S.D. concentrated on creating great bass fisheries, so a few times a year they got fed several thousand fingerling trout! The city made a lot of money by charging people to fish the reservoirs. 15-20 pound bass came out of those lakes every year, with one 25+ pounder a few years ago. Seems it was foul hooked and wasn't eligible for the record largemouth......
     
  6. If you think flies outfish curly tailed plastic worms you haven't bass fished enough... I would love to go head to toe against a fly rodder with Berkeley power worms. Game set match.
     
  7. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    chad - texas has a different way of creating trophy largemouth fisheries than rainbow trout-happy california, but yes the trophy factor is always there!

    chuck - no ifs ands or buts about it. but there are times when worms do get out fished by other conventional methods, so there is a small window when you get in the with a fly. Although if there was a ton of money on the line, it would be nice to have 50lb fireline, a med-hvy baitcaster, and a 12:1 reel when you are hooked up in heavy cover.
     
  8. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    Couple 5 gal buckets and some aerators should do the trick :rofl:
     
  9. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    You can still soak a fly in anise oil just like the power worms :thumb:
     
  10. Fish bite and hold on longer
     
  11. Be Jofus G

    Be Jofus G Banned or Parked

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    I saw a show about the guys who caught that fish in socal. They caught her a few times and she was a hair under the record weight the first two. The last time they caught her she smashed the world record but was hooked in the assmouth so they didn't get the record. That fish was a freaking pig. It looked like it swallowed basketball. It was caught using plastic swim baits, If I am not mistaken.
     
  12. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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  13. Chad Lewis

    Chad Lewis NEVER wonder what to do with your free time

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    RIP Dottie.

    Chuckngear, I bought some curly-tailed plastic lures after I saw some bass bugs in a shop tied with the tails. Looked like a good idea. Could probably use scud back and accomplish the same thing. Scud back might even keep me in the good graces of some of my buddies, seeing as how it's an "approved" fly-tying material and all. Think I'll hold off on the anise oil until I get really desperate.
     
  14. HauntedByWaters

    HauntedByWaters Active Member

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    LOL!

    I thought I knew all the hilarious bass names!