Intermediate lines!

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by WA-Fly, Oct 21, 2012.

  1. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    I've had the fishing buddy since they first came out also GAT. you should see how they work with the side finder looking under brush in tide water for chinook while bobber and egg fishing! great tools, but now I need the new gps tracking and down imaging, finders have come a long - long way. Santa are you reading this????
     
  2. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Mark, I'm getting off topic here but suffice it to say I've had a lot of different Fish'n Buddies. Two were before Hummin (or however you spell it) Bird bought out Bottomline. My first H-Bird finally died so I bought a new one.

    You DO NOT need the color model but all of mine have included the side finder feature... THAT you want. I own the 120 and it will do everything you need. The color feature is a waste of money and burns up batteries much quicker than the 120.

    Now, enough of that. Maybe I'll start a thread in regards to fish/depth finders.
     
  3. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    Good point. I really try to avoid indicators if there is any other reasonable option so that method wasn't on my radar when I made the statement. I know I would catch more fish using them. I just don't like doing it.

    Re Fishin Buddy: I had an old original one and sold it. It wasn't that great as there was no detail. I now use a wrist mount finder with wireless sonar for the tube/toon, love it. Are the new Fishin Buddys improved? I've heard they have been. Thread drift....
     
  4. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    LC, yes, the Hummbird model is an improved design. It has plenty of detail. If you want more detail, you may be interested in the color model.

    I hate using indicators. I get bored too easily when I use them. Too bad the system works so damned well. I'll switch to using an indicator with midge emerger patterns if nothing else is working but I won't like it :)
     
  5. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    I have a $1000 Raymarine in the skiff that was part of the deal. If you like detail, you'd love this one. I'd just as soon have a $500 unit I can actually understand;-) If you remember the old FBs they were about 5 pixels to the inch. The pics do look much better. I don't care about color on a portable--sidefinder is very handy.
     
  6. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    Well, hell. If you're using a thousand dollar depth finder the FB can't compare to that!

    The detail is good enough for me with the FB. I just want to know the depth and possible structure and if there are any fish around or if I'm just fishing in a bathtub. If the lake is deep and the fish are holding on the bottom, I know to use my full fast sinking line... I'm wasting my time if I'm trying an intermidiate sinking or dry line.
     
  7. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    Back to the discussion on Denny Rickards :)

    Saw him today while working at ISE and told him we were making fun of him on the internet. His face fell and he asked what people were saying.

    "Keep your damn rod tip in the water!"

    He threw his head back and laughed. I think it made his day.
     
    Jeff Dodd, GAT and troutpocket like this.
  8. GAT

    GAT Dumbfounded

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    :D:D I knew he had a sense of humor. The comment is his trademark.

    I don't have a trademark .. dang it.
     
  9. Peyton00

    Peyton00 Active Member

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    I posted last week or so about a new fly line needed. I did some research and read old threads. I still have questions for 6wt lines?

    I have a floating line and a type 2 sinking line. Should i get a deep sinking line type VI? It sounds like the type 2 sinking line is really close to an intermediate line... i dont need two lines close in range, so i was thinking about the deep sink line.
    Is the intermediate line better because its clear and the type 2 is solid green?

    thanks for the input again guys... it really helps getting info from good sources.
     
  10. Peyton00

    Peyton00 Active Member

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    I have been itching to get the new line, just dont know which way to go. I will be using the new line for trolling lakes for trout, and anchor fishing( cast and strip). So..... let me hear the reasoning behind the line you think i need.:D
     
  11. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    Well, if you read up on the old threads, you saw that most lake guys carry a floater, intermediate (or type 2), and a fast sinker. Fish that green type 2 until you decide it's not meeting your needs.

    Of the popular "intermediate" lines on the market, the SA stillwater and Rio Aqualux are essentially type 2 sinkers. The cortland clear camo and Rio Hover are "true" intermediates that sink <1" per second. Is there a difference? Yup. Does it matter? Depends who you ask :)

    You certainly should get a fast sinker. I started carrying one 4 years ago . . . whole new game.
     
  12. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    For trout, I have an intermediate slime line (Type I), a Type II, and a Type IV and a Deep Water Express. If I were to do it over again I'd eliminate the Type II and IV and get a III. This last year I've gone to using the slime line or IV almost exclusively in lakes. I control the depth by the amount of line I have out and the speed of stripping. I don't think you need much more. A type I, III, and VI would be a great setup.

    The Deep Water Express is handy for inflows or a few situations where you need to get down to 30' or so. For me that's either when there's a deep inflow with current, or kokanee. I hate the stuff but need it a couple of times a year. A Type VI would do it with lead added.
     
  13. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    I don't think Intermediate is close to Type II, but may be just me. If I fish lakes where the fish are cruising more shallow, I will use Intermediate, however, if there is wind and I am being moved or even chop on the surface, I will switch to the Type II. Also, how much line you have out will make a difference. I generally cast 60 or so feet, then peel line off while kicking backwards. When I get to where I am seeing backing then I start stripping.
    I feel during warmer months a faster sinking line is the game changer. I am a firm believer in a Deep 6 or 7. I use knot sense and put a dot on the line at 20', 30', 45' 60'. Type 7 is great for stripping streamers when fish are deep and also for Chironomiding (the reason I mark the line)
    I say your floating can cover the Intermediate needs, just use longer leaders and heavy flies. Type II all around great. Try counting down as well.
     
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  14. LCnSac

    LCnSac John or "LC"

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    Floating lines are not a good substitute here for a sinker, mainly because it tends to get tangled in the kayak paddles from the nature lovers who took a course in lake touring and like to get nice and close to us when they are trekking their one mile sightseeing tour.

    You can find light grappling hooks that can be tossed 30 or 40 feet and with a speedy retrieve can connect well to a $2000 kevlar ocean kayak that will never see anything but an urban lake. Half J/K.
     
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  15. Red Arch

    Red Arch Active Member

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    Issue with a floating line is depending on how heavy the flies are you will create a hinge effect on a strip, as the line moves on the strip and the streamer comes up in the water column while moving forward.
    With the intermediate debate there are 0.5ips lines (Rio Hover) and some places market a 1.5-2.0ips as a fast intermediate or just an intermediate (Rio Aqualux/SA Stillwater).
    Funny thing about the Rio Camolux I own is that you can turn it into a floating line by adding a line dressing.

    As for fishing I was using a Type III uniform this fall in around 9 feet or so of water, once my whole line had sunk (great method...) I would start striping. Advantage over the Intermediate is I can get more casts in a set amount of time, however not all lakes are deep enough.
    However I find myself using the Intermediate in competitions, but that was because it was for an 8# and I could cast further while the type III was in a 6#.