NFR Just an Observation

Krusty

Active Member
#17
Yes, I well remember my proteges' brilliant pre-social media conversational skills (why, we were virtual Einsteins in that respect). Sometimes we preferred to converse in ancient sanskrit or aramaic hebrew. Sadly, that is all lost...the casualty of text-messaging and facebook.

Fortunately, some remnant of that golden age of human empathy, intelligence, decent pet care, and erudition remains alive in this forum...and within, especially, this thread.
 
#18
Not only is the social skills that we learn back then diminishing along with the ability to have face to face conversations but, kids today don't want to be outside the way we used to, hell my mom had to call the cops to look for me and bring me home but, the art of writing with pen and paper and thier ability to spell and form whole words without using abbreviations is also being lost. Ask a kid sometime to spell a word that perhaps you had in a spelling Bee when you were younger, chances are, they won't be able to, and forget about reading a hard copy book.
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
#19
Not only is the social skills that we learn back then diminishing...Ask a kid sometime to spell a word that perhaps you had in a spelling Bee when you were younger, chances are, they won't be able to...
I don't think they would get Monophthong any more than I would without chuckling...
 
#20
I believe Porter has a pretty good view of today's kids. Having spent (recently) 26 years in a classroom, I have seen a change in the demeanor of kids. When they are really young, say 1st through 3rd grades, they are really nice kids; inquisitive, respectful, loving; all the things you would want in your children, mostly. Something happens around nine to ten years old. They get street-wise, sassy, argumentative, you pick the adjective. By the time they are in middle school the attitude is so heavy you could use it for ballast in a boat. My teaching partners and I just shook our heads at some of them and commented on the future of our society. They have no empathy and lying and cheating are everyday occurances. It's a damn shame. Then you look at their parents, if you ever meet them, and all of the questions are answered. There ought to be a test for parenting.
 

Krusty

Active Member
#23
I believe Porter has a pretty good view of today's kids. Having spent (recently) 26 years in a classroom, I have seen a change in the demeanor of kids. When they are really young, say 1st through 3rd grades, they are really nice kids; inquisitive, respectful, loving; all the things you would want in your children, mostly. Something happens around nine to ten years old. They get street-wise, sassy, argumentative, you pick the adjective. By the time they are in middle school the attitude is so heavy you could use it for ballast in a boat. My teaching partners and I just shook our heads at some of them and commented on the future of our society. They have no empathy and lying and cheating are everyday occurances. It's a damn shame. Then you look at their parents, if you ever meet them, and all of the questions are answered. There ought to be a test for parenting.
My wife has been in education for well over 30 years, and she'd very much agree with you...though it far predates the introduction of extensive social media. She believes that general parenting skills have diminished to astoundingly low levels. Uninvolved parents, and children produced via a continually churning variety of short-term 'hook-ups'. And by the time those children become parents.....they have absolutely no idea of what good parenting might look like.

I am, however, amused (yet saddened) by some of my acqaintances' condemnation of today's youth, when they themselves have led lives that have perpetuated precisely such an outcome; multiple marriages/families, abusive behavior, and an inability to think much beyond short-term gratification. The amazing thing is they tend to think of themselves as being quite 'conservative'....when all they really tend to be are selfish hypocrits.
 
#24
My girl is nine right now. She's plays with and loves all the pets and the chickens too. In her 3rd grade class it's cool to be in 4h. She's always liked to watch TV and fool around in the computer, and after I got a smart phone in 2009 she took to that pretty quickly. Even though she'll sit and stare at one of the devices for hours, if there is something physical to do she's usually up for it.

When she gets punished I'll hear little snippets of conversations coming from her room. She's usually telling a cat what a meanie I am or why she doen't deserve the punishment.
 

wyofly

Active Member
#25
I live in Wyoming ranching and farming country a few miles from a town with an 1,100 population. The kids that I know personally are employed on the family farm or ranch, active in sports and many are on the honor roll. The kids have their own horses and dogs. Some of the dogs are stock dogs and others are bird dogs. They participate in roundups, brandings and drive tractors at a very young age. The high school has put on fly tying and fly casting seminars for the kids and I have assisted with both casting and tying. I’m currently helping a 16 year old neighbor train his Lab for waterfowl and upland hunting.
I only know a few town kids mostly through church and sports. Crime is close to non-existent in the area and people don’t lock their doors and leave keys in their vehicles. All of the kids that I’m associated with are polite, courteous and don’t dress like their counterparts in larger communities. When I needed help with my Ipod Touch, the star of the girl’s basketball team and honor student straightened me out. I’m wondering if the local kids are different due to the small town environment, low crime rate and working within the family business? What ever the reason, our small community is proud of the kids and their accomplishments.
 

Krusty

Active Member
#26
I live in Wyoming ranching and farming country a few miles from a town with an 1,100 population. The kids that I know personally are employed on the family farm or ranch, active in sports and many are on the honor roll. The kids have their own horses and dogs. Some of the dogs are stock dogs and others are bird dogs. They participate in roundups, brandings and drive tractors at a very young age. The high school has put on fly tying and fly casting seminars for the kids and I have assisted with both casting and tying. I’m currently helping a 16 year old neighbor train his Lab for waterfowl and upland hunting.
I only know a few town kids mostly through church and sports. Crime is close to non-existent in the area and people don’t lock their doors and leave keys in their vehicles. All of the kids that I’m associated with are polite, courteous and don’t dress like their counterparts in larger communities. When I needed help with my Ipod Touch, the star of the girl’s basketball team and honor student straightened me out. I’m wondering if the local kids are different due to the small town environment, low crime rate and working within the family business? What ever the reason, our small community is proud of the kids and their accomplishments.
One set of my grandchildren live in a rural area far from Spokane. There are a lot of good kids, and a great deal of positive community 'peer pressure' that helps keep kids on better paths...but I assure you that there are still a number of dirtbag families that have produced generations of 'pond scum'...some of which now grace the state penitentary.
 
#27
I live in Wyoming ranching and farming country a few miles from a town with an 1,100 population. The kids that I know personally are employed on the family farm or ranch, active in sports and many are on the honor roll. The kids have their own horses and dogs. Some of the dogs are stock dogs and others are bird dogs. They participate in roundups, brandings and drive tractors at a very young age. The high school has put on fly tying and fly casting seminars for the kids and I have assisted with both casting and tying. I’m currently helping a 16 year old neighbor train his Lab for waterfowl and upland hunting.
I only know a few town kids mostly through church and sports. Crime is close to non-existent in the area and people don’t lock their doors and leave keys in their vehicles. All of the kids that I’m associated with are polite, courteous and don’t dress like their counterparts in larger communities. When I needed help with my Ipod Touch, the star of the girl’s basketball team and honor student straightened me out. I’m wondering if the local kids are different due to the small town environment, low crime rate and working within the family business? What ever the reason, our small community is proud of the kids and their accomplishments.
Sounds like a great community. I think that's the key. Small communities, which can be small towns but can exist in big cities too, create accountability for behavior. When we're all accountable for our own behavior and take an active role in holding others accountable for theirs - through all sorts of mechanisms (explicit and implicit), then the results can be positive. Parenting involves modeling good behavior and holding our kids accountable for theirs. Not always easy and at times damn hard.
 

David Loy

Senior Moment
#28
Both of my granddaughters wanted dogs. So we gave them dogs. Now I have two dogs that want and need my attention. The girls can't be bothered with the dogs anymore so they now come to me for attention and loving. The dogs that is. I feed and water them and clean up after them, which doesn't bother me at all.

But when the dogs pass on that is all.
FWIW, this is my story too (except insert daughters).