Kalaloch Report

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by fmunoz, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. quadradomus

    quadradomus Member

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    Peter,
    Thanks for the info. on that vid. I had a feeling that you might recognize something from it.:thumb:
     
  2. Peter Pancho

    Peter Pancho Active Member

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    Beach 4 is our families favorite beach in Washington. Back in the 70's and 80's we would limit 5 gal buckets of 3-5lb perch like crazy surf fishing with tube *****, and by the end of the day, limit out on smelt, it was crazy. No more days like those anymore. Washington is slowly depleting in every fish imaginable.

    PS, back in the day, ocean shores was the same with the mad 5 gal buckets of fish, not anymore, really sad what it is now.
     
  3. Randru

    Randru Member

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    Hey Peter,

    Those 5 gal buckets wouldn't have anything to do with the low stocks you speak of would it? Maybe with real tight restrictions now we might be able to get the numbers back to those good old days.
     
  4. salt dog

    salt dog card shark

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    Fmunoz, Red Tailed Perch do school and are always on the move. If the winds and waves were low, likely the fish were out further from the beach.

    Typically I find the fish just behind the shore breaking waves, as they are interested in what food the wave is kicking up from the beach, and swing in and out, timing their scavenging with the wave action. I cast just over the top of the wave as it is breaking, into the smooth trough between the waves, angling 45 degrees or more into the trough.

    Before fishing, spend some time observing the waves along the beach, preferably from a raised location to see what it tells you of the bottom structure. After a while, you should be able to see areas where the rollers coming in are not breaking: this signifies a deeper spot, and may hold fish, or may be used by the fish as a path through the underwater sand dunes to the beach. Also, watch for areas where the water from the waves collect along the beach and then consistently dump back into the ocean; a bit of a 'rip tide'. Again, the underwater structure of the beach is showing itself, and fishing alongside these areas are frequently productive.

    These key places change depending on the tide height, so keep your eyes open and keep moving because the fish will be moving too.

    Good luck.
     
  5. Gertie's Pa

    Gertie's Pa New Member

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    Randru ,
    I doubt a few anglers taking five gallon buckets of surf perch has much to do with apparent drops in surf perch populations. I drive the beaches often enough to know very few of us angle these wonderful fish. I do, however, see them stacked like cord wood on ice at pike place market. The upswing of the seal population is another huge detriment to their once plentiful numbers. I don't advocate taking "buckets full" but a few for the fryer is a good motivation to get out there.
     
  6. Randru

    Randru Member

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    I do agree with you delbertnipper. Anglers on the whole do give back more to the environment than they take and often it is other factors that affect the downfall of the fishing stocks that we so often remember, however I was pointing out the dichotomy of the statement that Peter made of lamenting the reduced stocks while at the same time talking about how back in the day the fish were taken by the bucketful.

    If you look back at any fish stock they to a large extent are at a reduced state than they were a decade back. Often these same stocks are commemorated by images of some smiling fishermen holding up a large stringer of fish. I find this rather uniquely oxymoronic that we do so.

    Maybe as anglers we should educate our selves to not lament the times where we were indiscriminately taking fish but to look at these as actions to which we are now seeing the consequences and see the past as a time to learn from and make better choices.

    But as they say this might all be a piss in the wind and the seals are going to eat what is left and we can't do thing one about it.

    R