Ketchum Release

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Twilightman, Sep 18, 2002.

  1. Twilightman

    Twilightman New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Missoula, MT
    Noticed quite a bit of discussion couple days ago concerning CR. and the safest method of releasing, handling, reviving the fish. To each his own, but I think the Ketchum Release is by far the best tool. Never have to touch the fish, easier on your flys and you can revive it also. I noticed most of the guides in Montana use it. Comments??
     
  2. Steelie L

    Steelie L Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Issaquah
    I agree with you -- Ketchum Release is very handy.
     
  3. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Messages:
    26,833
    Likes Received:
    5,428
    Location:
    Dillon, Mt
    What do I know---I'm just an old man

    OK,I'll bite Whats a Ketchem Release. Is it about Lake Ketchem
     
  4. Greg

    Greg Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Gig Harbor, WA, U.S.A.
    Twilightman,

    Never could understand why I should spend $20 on this tool when a pair of hemostats does the same job. Why am I wrong?

    Greg
     
  5. Twilightman

    Twilightman New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Missoula, MT
    Who said you were wrong? I said "to each his own". It works for me...I don't damage my flys and I see lots of people grab the fish to remove the hook with hemostats...hey, if you can release the fish without touching it using hemostats, thats absolutely awesome. You are the man!!
     
  6. Twilightman

    Twilightman New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Missoula, MT
    Go to Cabela's .com Type in ketchum release. 3 sizes depending on fly size.
     
  7. Greg

    Greg Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Gig Harbor, WA, U.S.A.
    Clear the air...I'm not being antagonistic. I'm truly inquisitive.

    That said, I can hold the leader with my left hand, reach down with the hemostat in my right hand to the fly, clamp onto it, give it a twist and the fish is released. Not sure why this would be "awesome" or make me "the man" for doing it this way. Explanation please. What makes the Ketchum Release better? Like I said, this is not antagonistic, I truly would like to know.

    Greg
     
  8. Twilightman

    Twilightman New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Missoula, MT
    Geez....sounds like you don't need one. Happy fishing!
     
  9. Steelie L

    Steelie L Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Issaquah
    Greg: Two reasons I favor the Ketchum Release over hemostats in many situations...

    1) I find that the Ketchum does less damage to my flies in the long run.

    2) When the fish is squirming around -- especially small fish -- I find it easier to slide the Ketchum down the tippet and onto the fly. With hemostats, it's sometimes more difficult for me to locate and grip the fly when the fish is squirming. Using the Ketchum, I'm able to make the quickest release possible, usually without ever touching the fish with my hands.

    It sounds like you've got the hemostat gig down pat, releasing the fish safely with minimal (or no) handling, which is excellent. I enjoy the power of hemostats when dealing with larger fish like steelhead, but for smaller, more squirrelly trout, I like the ease of the Ketchum. The one negative about the Ketchum is that it's expensive ($20), and there's no convenient way to attach it to your person the way you can with hemostats.

    Cheers.
     
  10. Greg

    Greg Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Gig Harbor, WA, U.S.A.
    Steelie L,

    Thanks for taking the time to explain the benefits. I can see this tool may have some for the freshwater Trout angler. Got to say I haven't experienced any damaged flies by using hemostats, but then again, I don't fish #18 BWOs, either - since all my flyfishing is done in the salt, the smallest fly I use is a #12 Euphasiid pattern. The smaller 8-10" Cutts I've caught have not been a problem to release as I described above, probably because there's still enough bare hook at the bend to grip with the hemostats.

    Twilightman mentioned something about 3 different sizes depending upon fly size...how many different sized Ketchum Tools do you carry with you since on any given day it is feasible that you could be fishing everying from a #8 or #10 streamer pattern to something that matches the hatch in size #20 or even smaller?

    I guess my BIG question now is would they hold up without corroding in saltwater? Still don't think I can justify the $20 expenditure in my particular case, however.

    Greg
     
  11. XstreamAngler

    XstreamAngler ...has several mistresses.

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2001
    Messages:
    667
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Seattle, wa, King.
    Home Page:
    I use that long red thing in my Plano Jr. Fisherman box! It has a fat round end and a not so fat round end! Do it right and the gills of the fish get torn and they bleed out before they hit the stringer! The KR is made of a space age poly material, somewhat of a gummy outer core for grip and a hard plastic otherwise. It really is a neat little tool, I do not use one and I guide in Montana because I hate having too many things dangle off of me, it gets in the way of sucking on a cold Schmidty or a warm Flask! To those who do use it, they love it! Me, give me a Hemostat, nice and long please....oh and a cold Schmidty!
     
  12. Steelie L

    Steelie L Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 1969
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Issaquah
    Greg: 90% of my trout fishing is done with flies in the #10-18 range. The standard medium-sized KR handles these fine. For larger flies (I rarely use anything smaller than #18), I just just my hemostats or fingers.

    Thus far, all of my fly fishing has been in freshwater, so I can't speak to the KR's durability in the salt.

    Tight lines.
     
  13. Skunk Butt

    Skunk Butt New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2002
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    .
    I had a good friend give me the best and cheapest tool for extracting flies. You take a clothes hanger and a pair of pliers with cutters and it will take you about 2 minutes to make. Cut 6" of the hanger and at one end make two 60 degree bends at about 1 " apart. Presto you are done. I put a cork on the other end in case it falls in the river...guess I could attach it to a lanyard as well... I will take a picture. Works just like a ketchum release. :pROFESSOR
     
  14. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Messages:
    26,833
    Likes Received:
    5,428
    Location:
    Dillon, Mt
    What do I know---I'm just an old man

    Along these same lines. When I went to the Sportsman Show in Puyallup this year the Dept of F&W were handing out just what you all are talking about. All It looked like was a cup holder on the end if a wooden rod.

    But I don't have to worry about unhooking fish,as lately I just can't seem to catch any.

    Jim
     
  15. pwoens

    pwoens Active Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    2,557
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Spokane, Washington, USA.
    Home Page:
    Im with you Jim...I have sooo many excuses why I havent caught fish lately that I have no need to put in my two cents on the KR :LOVEIT . But I have used it and it works great, granted I have gone back to my hemostats for carrying ease. As mentioned earlier, to each his own. It all comes down to your personal preference.