Kodiak Island June-July

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by troutpocket, May 1, 2003.

  1. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    I will be spending the majority of June and early July on Kodiak Island. I will likely have ample time to fish but no $$ for guides/lodges. I know there are a bunch of fly-out lodges but has anyone tried to fish off the road system (if there is one?)? I am fairly well equipped for western WA trout and steelheading (5wt with several lines and an 8wt with sink-tip system).

    From what I've read, sockeye and chinook will be around in June with coho, chum, and pinks showing up later in the summer. I'd love to get into some light tackle fishing for rainbows, dollies, and/or grayling if they are around.

    First hand experience or links to more info would be greatly appreciated. Is there a fly shop on the island?

    Rod:beer2
     
  2. andrew

    andrew Active Member

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    Pick up the latest issue of Salt Water Fly Fishing...there is a whole spread on Kodiak Island...that is if you are not already inquirring becuase of the article:dunno
     
  3. riverdog

    riverdog Member

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    I will also be up there for a week or so in early July. I did the same last summer. Mac's is the place I go for my license, flies, and recommendations. There is a guy there that I know through my brother in law, who lives up there, but the guy's name escapes me at the moment.

    I have caught reds in the Buskin River, just below the lake. If you are heading out of town toward the airport, take a right just before you cross the Buskin. The road turns to dirt, and you want to stay left. Just before the dead end/turnaround, you can park and the river is literally a few steps behind some trees. Just like anywhere else, the easy-access spots are sometimes crowded with gear-chuckers, but again, just like anywhere else, if you play nice, etc., you will soon be ushered to the honey hole. By far the best red fishing I've done is at a place called Saltery Creek. It is an hour's ATV ride from the parking lot just off the American River. If you ask around enough, and buy enough flies a the local fly shops, you can probably find someone who is going out there, and rent an ATV locally. It is difficult to find if you have never been, but the ride is lots of fun, and the fishing is fantastic. The favorite fly for sockeyes is a red Gammie hook with a tuft of green or chartreus yarn tied just behind the eye. I think it is called "green eyes." If you are set on tying your own flies, I recommend getting a hold of the Alaska Flyfisher's book Fly Patterns of Alaska, published by Frank Amato Publications.

    Whatever you do, don't overlook the Dolly fishing. Only a few of the locals consider this worth their time. I have a lot of luck at Mission Bay--an unlikely looking beach. Check the tides, and target two hours after high tide. The Dollies seem to like a fry pattern (white/blue; white/chartreus; white/silver) stripped fast. Wade out as far as you can, cast out as far as you can, put your rod in your armpit, and strip with both hands--hand over hand style. No kidding. I figured this out when I got most of my strikes when lifting my rod tip up to raise my line for my next cast. I used some epoxy fry patterns I tied at home, and when I ran out, I went to Mac's and found something similar. Your 5 weight will be perfect for this.

    Post to the board if you can when you are up there and let us know how you do. Depending on when I go up, and whether you are still there, it might be good to meet up. I am the sole flyfisherman in the household when my family and I go up, and I'm nearly always on my own when I go out fishing.

    Good luck, and have fun.

    Drew
     
  4. Dutchman

    Dutchman Tom Van Gelder

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    The road system is great. I have been lucky to fish around Kodiak a half dozen times due to work. Each trip was only for a few days but the road system let me get to quiet a few different rivers in the evening after work. The Buskin is close to town and you have good acess, also the Olds and the American rivers are easy to get to. Since it sounds like you will be there for for a few weeks it may be worth the drive to the Pasagshak, I have not got to fish that area but all the locals talk about it.
    As mentioned in one of the other replys Macs is a good place for supplies and info. The rods you mention will be fine. I bring a 6 and 8 and have had no problems. I would also suggest you bring a spinning rod, the wind and rain will make casting a fly difficult at times.

    Good Luck and have Fun
    Tom
     
  5. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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    Thanks for the info. I am hoping to be up there for 6-7 weeks. I was reading a Kodiak tourism brochure last night and saw that a two week non-resident fishing license runs $50. No price was listed for an annual non-res. Will I need to shell out $50 every two weeks (not that I'm really complaining . . .)?

    I'm not a fly tier (yet) so is there a Seattle area shop that is pretty dialed in on flies for Kodiak?

    Thanks again,
    Rod
     
  6. Dutchman

    Dutchman Tom Van Gelder

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  7. AZTKflyguy

    AZTKflyguy New Member

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    The Pasagshak (sp?) is one river on the road system I fished a few years ago. It seemed to be the place to be for Sockeye. The Buskin is right outside of town and usually has dollies, kings & much later silvers.

    Enjoy your trip.
     
  8. saltchuck

    saltchuck New Member

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    The website was interesting. Particularly the licenses for the blind. 25 cents for a sportfishing license makes sense to me but $25 for a hunting license for the blind?
     
  9. mike58

    mike58 New Member

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    lynnwood, wa.
    the Buskin is sometimes a zoo, its narrow a the fish stack up just past the mouth with the tide coming in.
    further up you'll find more dollies up towards the road. the flies mentioned all work well. fished the American
    not nearly as crowded, you should keep an eye out for bears too. good luck
     
  10. pilchuck steelie

    pilchuck steelie Member

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    easily accessed streams would be the buskin, solonie creek, american river. fished it in september a number of years ago, caught silvers, kings both species were bright at that time. pinks, chums, and sockeye were dark, though some of the pinks and chums weren't too bad. caught a number of beautiful dollies 16"-18". very nice fishing.
     
  11. papafsh

    papafsh Piscatorial predilection

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    Check out akflyfishers.com
    Might find some info there that you can use.
    LB