leech flys

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by Top in my class, Jul 19, 2011.

  1. Top in my class

    Top in my class Member

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    I have just start tieing leech flys, and wanted to know how often some of you guys use them, or what your opinion is on using a rabbit fur leech when fly fishing for trout?

    Thanks,
    Spencer
     
  2. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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  3. Caveman

    Caveman Member

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    All the time, a go to fly when trolling or using an indicator.
     
  4. LJ

    LJ Low Tech Lo

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    Bunny fur is great - squirrel strips even better for very slim fly. Great swimming action. They are one of my best trolling flies. Good luck.
     
  5. Top in my class

    Top in my class Member

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    thanks guys,
    but now how are they different from a wolley bugger?
     
  6. Brian Thomas

    Brian Thomas Active Member

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    These are not my ties , I just pilfered them off the interwebs to illustrate .
    Rabbit strip
    [​IMG]

    Wooly bugger
    [​IMG]
     
  7. troutpocket

    troutpocket Active Member

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  8. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    As far as what they potentially represent, the leech for the most part mimics just that, leeches where as the bugger can and does potentially represent a variety of food for fish including leeches, damsels, dragons and even bait fish. Why not just fish a bugger then? Buggers are one of the worlds most popular flies for a reason, but on occasion the fish want that slimer profile that the leech provides. That leech pattern that troutpocket provided is killer with or without the bead.

    Caveman mentioned fishing them under an indicator. If you do check out this site http://www.flycraftangling.com/index.asp?p=145&szArticleButtonCommand=view&nArticleID=59 but I tie them more like a leech than a bugger and I also tie them like a Rickards stillwater nymph.

    Ira..
     
  9. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    Top, some of the answers that you seek.
    First, the profile between the two flies are different. Profile is an important identifier to both us and the fish. When the fish first sees your fly it must decide if it is a food form or not. Profile is a prime determining factor in this process.
    Second, these two flies move very differently in the water. When fishing stillwater, how our flies move thru the water and how the fly MOVES the water is what we call presentation (in part). Different materials have much different movement, such as the bugger with its hackle creates much different water movement than say a bunny leech. The fish not only see this movement but feel it as well.
    As we ply our trade while fishing, what we're really doing is manipulating the trout's instincts to trigger feeding behaviour. When we do this successfully we get a strike. The flies we choose to use while on the water and the materials they're made of have much to say about our experiences flyfishing.
     
  10. Top in my class

    Top in my class Member

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    [​IMG]
    ok i dont think this picture loaded if not i am going to keep trying but this is the pattern i have been tieing and would like to try would it work?
     
  11. Top in my class

    Top in my class Member

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  12. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Bunny leaches are great. Tie some long and some short. They will get water logged and heavy to cast on lighter rigs, but the fish don't seem to care what your rod feels like when they are eating your leeches.
     
  13. Drifter

    Drifter Active Member

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    That flycraft fly was awesome . what a great idea for such a different look .
     
  14. Top in my class

    Top in my class Member

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    thanks mumbles
     
  15. Irafly

    Irafly Indi "Ira" Jones

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    That fly is a good pattern, but there are easier patterns to tie that are as effective. I agree with Mumbles though, tie them shorter/smaller, with/out a bead/weight and in different colors like olive, white, orange or combinations, and you are seriously set for your leeches.

    As for an easier pattern, I use a size 10 scud hook, a bead of any color to match, thread to match the bunny strip you choose, I wrap the hook with the thread, cut the bunny at an angle, slip the angled part of the bunny under the bead at the eye of the hook, tie that off and call it good. Real leeches in the water column have a very skinny profile when they swim.

    Ira..