Leech Help...

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Camo Clad Warrior, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    Try wetting it and folding the fibbers back as you wrap it on the hook
    I keep a small bowl or cup of water on the bench while I am tying for that purpose


    I have a nice articulated leech pattern
    I use crosscut bunny strips
    big trout love it
     
  2. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    For me, I have never used the string that comes with Mohair. I strip the fibers off and make my own dubbing loop. The string is just too bulky to me.
     
  3. Brad Niemeyer

    Brad Niemeyer Old School Member

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    Here's my Bead Belly Leech. The beads make it ride hook point up, give it weight and add some sparkle. Marabou plume is tied flat on top, matuka style. Its just a wild card leech for those days when standard patterns don't seem to be working
    View attachment 37507
     
  4. triploidjunkie

    triploidjunkie Active Member

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    I usually only use mohair for mini-leeches. I like marabou patterns for full size leeches. The ones I see around here(and they'te pretty common. try swimming in a local lake and you'll get one on your leg) are brownish/oily-black in color and usually 2.5-6 inches. I like blue's pattern and will give it a whirl, only in differnt colors. I never have luck with purple here.
     
  5. Camo Clad Warrior

    Camo Clad Warrior Member

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    Thanks again for all the help. I have the mohair down now. Will tie up a bunch and give them a whirl at pass sunday.
     
  6. kelvin

    kelvin Active Member

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    sweet
     
  7. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

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    do'n it 4 the chinookie
    Why don't you guys tie these leaches on a tube... You can then set the hook at whatever distance you wish from the front to back of the fly...
     
  8. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    I just recently thought of that. I have never tied tube flies and realize the initial pre cost for set-up, but my question, is it that big of an advantage? Again, I have never tied or used one. I understand the concept though. One fly, many different hooks.
     
  9. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

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    do'n it 4 the chinookie
    Blue, cheap to get going actually...
    I think you can get a tube attachment for the vise for 20.00 or so, or, some simply tie on large needles. Plastic tubes via hmh are cheap too, or, wd40 red plastic tubes or ink pen plastic work(Ink get's a bit messy but you got the idea)
    I like tubes in that it's fast and easy and cheap to tie larger profile flies. You can tie them in the round if you want, or add a wing, and they generally right themselves with the wing up if you don't use junktion tubing. Also, a huge advantage is hooking ability, generally speaking, a fish hooked on a stinger/tube fly has a greater chance to stay buttoned up- You choose where the hook is positioned on the fly without haveing a long shank to add unwanted leverage. Many steelheaders
    ( I for one) don't leave for the river without them especially in winter-
    A very versitile method you should try I'm bet'n !
    At first, don't get all tied up in the different tubes and parts and configurations, keep it simple at first, and you'll be off to a good start:thumb:
    BTW, back in the day a few years back befor I discovered steelhead and I was after big trout , u and your hubby were hammering those huge fish over on the big res. and jamm'n on the guitar, still at it??
     
  10. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    LOL. Very cool. Still after the big trout, but retired on the music. All good though. Okay, now I got to try the tubes. Like you said, keep it simple might be the key. How about those tiny bar straws for stirring?
     
  11. Leroy Laviolet

    Leroy Laviolet Aint no nookie like chinookie

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    Great idea, but if you gotta buy the martini that comes with the straw, that makes 'em a bit spendy:rofl:
    Seriously, great idea!!
     
  12. Ed Call

    Ed Call Mumbling Moderator Staff Member

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    Blue, other possible tubes to use to start out: Coffee stirrers, smallest diameter you can find; Q tips or brand of choice, plastic shaft, clip off the cotton covered ends. These are nice and small in internal diameter; some hobby shops or pet shops will have softer clear tubing that can be the junction tubing for holding your hook to the tube...inexpensive options.

    I like the looks of the stepped diameter tube adapter and the other straight types that clamp into standard vice jaws. If I did not have a tube adapter and mandrel system from Nor Vise I'd go that route.
     
  13. triploidjunkie

    triploidjunkie Active Member

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    I tied up some of Blue's patterns. The yellow and orange ones are just attractors, the other three are more natural colored. All but one is sporting a beadhead. I'll tie up some more in different color variations. I'm tying a red/black right now that I bet will work magic. I'm going to try them out today if the temp gets over 0.
     
  14. Jeff Dodd

    Jeff Dodd Active Member

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    Nice! I will give this pattern a try for sure

     
  15. Blue

    Blue Active Member

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    I also like Black and Red plus Black and Burnt orange. Oh and then one time, at band camp, I over heard these two gentlemen out on the lake. They were catching trout on a regular basis. One was using a Brown bugger, the other an Olive, so, I tied up this soft hackle in Brown and Olive. It was the meal of choice at several local lakes and killed on Hebgen.

    Try a Yellow and Red (Mickey Fin)