Let's Play WFF Survivor!!

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by chadk, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Good thoughts Jesse. First thing is to assess your situation. Don't panic. Come up with a plan. First on the agenda (as everyone pointed out) is to get warm and dry.
    The temp is probably about 40 and dropping. Hypothermia will be chipping away at both of them before they know it.

    Interesting idea with the rocks and getting the matches accross. :beer2:

    But too bad for our friend George, but Fred only has the small tippet spools - and the 2 or 3 he has are running low on line. Not that it matters... His arm just doesn't have what it takes to get anything accross. He just barely survived the cold water and a solid beating. Now he's cold, shivering, and needs to get a fire going ASAP.

    But you are right - what happens that first night will surely make all the difference.
     
  2. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Cov - yes, a fire needs to be made. I don't know what chance George has to dry off his cotton clothes before he get's hypothermia. He has no way to start a firel, the sun is dissapearing behind the trees, and the temp is dropping fast.

    Good point about heading downstream in hopes of finding the gear.
     
  3. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    I'm leaning in this direction too. George won't survive the night without finding a way to get to Fred's fire.
     
  4. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Well, I don't think George has time and sun is pretty much gone. Drying out those cloths just isn't going to happen in time. I agree with running up or down to find a crossing point. I think if he stays, he dies.

    Good point aout the shelter and bed. You need shelter from the wind and rain - but also insultation from the cold earth below you...
     
  5. SuperDave

    SuperDave New Member

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    A testimonial for "The Seven Cardinal P's": Proper Prior Planning Prevents Pee Poor Performance.

    It is IMPARATIVE that they stay put for the first night and get as dry as possible by a fire. Only after first light should they attempt to walk out, either up or downstream; not up/down the streambed but higher to avoid the rocks and debris. They should STAY together at all times!

    I've been in a similar situation TWICE in my years and I'm alive because I/we stayed calm and thought out our predicament. :thumb:

    SuperDave
     
  6. greyghost

    greyghost Member

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    Bear Grylls is great except when he thought a Grizzly was outside of his shelter during the night in the Canadian Rockies and decided to go running through the forest....bad move.

    Good topic Chad. If I were George, I would be strapping on that PFD and swimming across the river to Fred. If not, he won't make it more than a few hours unless of course he has mad skills and can start a fire drill style with some sticks. Once he gets across they should start a massive fire and strip off their wet clothing. Build a small shelter to protect from the elements. In the morning they should assess Fred's injuries and decide if walking out is an option. If so, judging by the rivers terrain it sounds like walking up or downstream might be tough because of steep canyon walls. Walking uphill will eventually hit the road that parallels the river, they know this because they drove in that way. If they get turned around or it becomes too difficult they can walk straight back down towrads the river where they know people will eventually be looking for them. If walking out is not an option they can keep a fire burning and stay busy by gathering food, water, wood and more materials for a shelter. If they can stay dry and hydrated they can surely make it two more days before their concerned and diligent wives send help.

    Pete
     
  7. otter

    otter Banned or Parked

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    Ok. Triage thinking.

    Fred is physically screwed up but has the gear.

    George is physically ok but doesn't have gear.

    The boats are gone. Don't even go there.

    The wives know, and two days from now will be screaming the alarm.

    So, George, take off all your clothes and wring them out as best you can. Empty out waders, and put them on again. Layers are good. Stack up as much duff as you can for your mattress, and then tear off a number of small evergreen branches, preferably cedar, for your blanket. Heap up as much duff over you as you can (the dry stuff from right around the bases of the trees) before you pull your cedar branch sleeping bag over you for the night. While you are doing this your body heat will be drying you out. You're gonna have a cold miserable sonovabitch of a night, but you'll survive.

    Holler at Fred across the river that you'll both go downriver in visual contact tomorrow morning until you find a crossing. Then you, George, will get wet again, because you will be doing the crossing. Remember, Fred is beat up, plus you can't afford to lose the survival gear - what little of it there is - if Fred loses it and gets pulled down the river.

    Fred -

    Get organized, warm & dry. Evaluate your injuries. Build a fire and a bed similar to George. Figure out how fast - or slow - you can travel and holler it out to George.

    The next morning. This would be day two. Travel downriver (less energy toll). Find the crossing. Once you find the crossing, Fred, build a bigass fire. Then George crosses over and dries out. You're both hungry but a long ways from tipping over from lack of food. Hydration is way more important. Build another duff/branch bed, but this ones a twin, with the survival blanket over it. Combine your body heat. Now, if you are lucky on day two, there will be other boats driftiing the river, and they will pick you up and get you home.


    Day three. If no boats the previous day,
    find an open gravel bar on the river. Build a bigass fire. Fish if you can, with the tippets, flies & stuff. Wait for boats, or the choppers.

    Day four. Same as above.

    Worst case: if it is weathered over (i.e., chopper's ain't flying, boat's ain't drifting), then you will have to make your best guess for the road and try to make your way there. Leave a note, if possible, at your site on the gravel bar.


    Good luck,


    otter
     
  8. ceviche

    ceviche Active Member

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    I don't know... George is wearing a PFD, so he can use it to his benefit. He has the choice of freezing to death on the wrong side of the river or jump back in, backstroking his way to the otherside. The buoyancy of that PFD should not be underestimated! Using it, while floating on his back, he will be able to maneuver quite well--probably enough to dodge many a rock and even enough to make it across the river. Think about it: It was clearly what allowed him to make it to shore in better shape than Fred. If he estimates that it will take him twice as long to reach the opposite shore as a drift boat, then he should look for a stretch of water that will put him in good position for that. How about a bend in the river sharing an outside bank with Fred?

    Eitherway, both of George's options place his life in risk. He should head upriver and give it his best, knowing that the flow will bring his efforts closer to his friend. Fred, meanwhile, can build a fire, getting things ready so George will be able to warm himself when he arrives. This is good for Fred, as he has all the survival gear and is on the side of the river with the road. He has the highest chance of making it through the night alone. Not so with George. The only thing he has going for himself is his PFD. That's it. And it's the one thing that will allow him to hook back up with Fred--who needs George's legs to find help. What other options are there? They definitely need each other.
     
  9. Zane Wyll

    Zane Wyll Member

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    great thread chad. sure makes a guy think about how to pepare himself for an outing. I think if I'm george the first thing Im doing is prying then I am doing what I have to to get across that river and to my buddy who is gonna need my help to gather fire wood and build a fire anyway if he is injured. I would go up stream not down because if the river did get contol for a while if I'm down stream I have even further to walk also I know the water above the rapids because I have alredy fished it today hopefully Im not so old that my memory is shot and I can remember the best closest place to cross. Then its get to my partner and build a fire and a make shift shelter. one day at a time.
     
  10. Zane Wyll

    Zane Wyll Member

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    great thread chad. sure makes a guy think about how to pepare himself for an outing. I think if I'm george the first thing Im doing is praying then I am doing what I have to to get across that river and to my buddy who is gonna need my help to gather fire wood and build a fire anyway if he is injured. I would go up stream not down because if the river did get contol for a while if I'm down stream I have even further to walk also I know the water above the rapids because I have alredy fished it today hopefully Im not so old that my memory is shot and I can remember the best closest place to cross. Then its get to my partner and build a fire and a make shift shelter. one day at a time.
     
  11. Stan Wright

    Stan Wright Active Member

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    I agree with SuperDave. Get dry, shelter, and stay put. I have a "pocket sruvival kit".... and my Boy Scout "Outdoor Essentials".... pocketknife, first aid kit, extra clothes, rain gear, water bottle, flashlight, trail food, matches & fire starters, sun block, map & compass. On my first Alaska fly out trip the guide and I got stranded on the river when the weather turned bad and the float plane couldn't pick us up. Thank goodness we weren't soaking wet like Fred & George. You never know when you might end up "camping out". The guide and I were prepared because we were thinking "what if?"

    Aloha,
    Stan
     
  12. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Good points. But the trick is getting them back together... Before George freezes to death... (hypothermia really)
     
  13. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Nicely done.
     
  14. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Again, nicely done. I'll update you on their first night and see how close you come :)
     
  15. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Right. Tough call on heading down for the hope of finding the gear vs heading up for a safer\closer crossing...