lines for bamboo spey

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by sourdoughsmitty, Jul 7, 2014.

  1. sourdoughsmitty

    sourdoughsmitty Member

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    My spey rod is a montague manitou 13ft aprox 10 wt, I was reading an excerpt from Art Lindgren (canada) and he mentioned yrears previousy he had taken a level line the weight for his rod and made a tip one line lower for his first ype of line. Where would one today find a level 10 line ? I have also heard some of the horror stories of people using heads on bamboo with dissasterous results ,over lining? I suppose I could just use a doubl etaper on this but was curious what my diy options were
    thanks smitty
     
  2. jake-e-boy

    jake-e-boy sans caféine

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    airflo skagit intermediate 660 grn

    or splice/weld/cut a WA 55, Delta, etc.

    over-lining a rod of any material will technically shorten the rods "lifespan" i wouldnt worry about shooting heads on boo, esp since Bob Clay suggest a scandi or skagit for his rods (riverwatch)
     
  3. Klickrolf

    Klickrolf Active Member

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    If your rod is ferruled I'd be careful, very careful. I'd suggest starting with a DT9F and be careful while figuring out where and how to load it. Level lines aren't really any different except they have no front or rear taper like Double Tapers DT's. You do not want to stress the cane at the joints so being slow and smooth will be important. Certainly the rod will throw a skag head but it ain't what it was made for. Go light until you find the right line, I'd stick with floaters until your confidence grows...that's when you'll break it.
     
  4. speyghillie

    speyghillie speyghillie

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    You do not want to stress the cane at the joints so being slow and smooth will be important. Certainly the rod will throw a skag head but it ain't what it was made for. Go light until you find the right line, I'd stick with floaters until your confidence grows...that's when you'll break it.
    Best advice..... you will be surprised how on the light line side you can go with Boo, try a longer light line, shooting heads are not really as good because of the longer slower casting stroke with Bamboo, and having all the weight in a short line doesn't help.
    I will add that when you have made your cast and the fly is fishing, find the balance on the rod and hold it at your casting side with a straight arm like you are carrying it, some guys hold the rod with a bent arm like its Carbon fibre, leading to them feeling their arms sore, and complaining that's it too heavy, straight arm while the fly is fishing......... and you can cast all day.
    Cheers Gordon.
    DTX Pro Staff.
     
  5. Tom Bowden

    Tom Bowden Active Member

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    The taper and construction of your rod was probably designed for silk DT or level lines. I'd try a DT8 or 9 modern line. If you do decide to try a modern shooting head line, go really light, i.e. 450 grains or lower.

    Finding the right line for a bamboo spey rod can be difficult. There are lots of variables, including the fact that every bamboo rod is a little bit different, casting style, and fishing situations. The best way is to attend a spey casting clinic or event with lots of lines available, so you can find what works best for you.

    I suggest taping the ferrules after assembling. This helps keep things in place & reduces stress on the ferrule area. In his video, Simon Gawsworth recommends taping graphite spey rods.

    Tom
     
  6. sourdoughsmitty

    sourdoughsmitty Member

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    great info guys this is the 2nd boo 2 hander I have owned the former a hardy wye met it's end at the fins of a steelhead on the wenatchee but it was due to it having more cancer than we thought .this rod was mfg late 20's late 30's so yes caution is the word here as all of you have mentioned interesting thought on taping a ferruled rod I know it is standard on a spliced rod like a sharpes the question to this is why would taping a ferrule reduce stress on it ? I understand it keeps the joint from moving .I love the way boo makes you slow down quite a difference between it and plastic not to mention in this configuration quite a converastion starter
    thanks again for all th einfo now to dig into th egear bag------ smitty
     
  7. Klickrolf

    Klickrolf Active Member

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    If you heavily tape ferruled rods at the junctions of the cane and metal ferrule you could add some integrity. I've never thought of doing it but it could save a rod...for a little while.
     
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  8. sourdoughsmitty

    sourdoughsmitty Member

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    thanks I'll try some of the tape