Lockjaw silvers...

Discussion in 'Saltwater' started by ak_powder_monkey, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    Whats everybodies favorite way to fis lockjaw silvers right at the mouth of rivers? I had my fly in about 50 of em for a good hour yesterday and never got a hit :beathead:
     
  2. miyawaki

    miyawaki Active Member

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    Use a very sparsly tied #6 Mustad 34007 with a gold beadhead, gold tinsel body and one wrap of orange hackle over one wrap of yellow. Fish an intermediate tip line very slowly. You are looking for the very few biters in the school.

    Leland.
     
  3. Steve Rohrbach

    Steve Rohrbach Puget Sound Fly Fisher

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    Pick up a copy of Fly Fishing for Pacific Salmon (the newly revised book will be out next spring) and check out the waiting period flies. Once the Salmon start to acclimate for their trip into fresh water they stop feeding. Waiting period flies are typically small, sparse and can range from bright to drab colors. I have had waiting period fish balk at 15 flies and then hit number 16 hard. After hitting a couple of biters, they ignore that fly and it is back to experimenting for the fly that triggers the striking reaction. Our friends in British Columbia have waiting period boxes with dozens of different patterns. I continue to build my waiting period selection. The fly that Leland suggests has been used successfully for years by Mike Croft for waiting period fish. It has a place of honor in any waiting period box.
     
  4. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    Exactly.
     
  5. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    alright I'll try out little flies... Any other pattern ideas would be great, I'd pick up the book but by the time it gets here I'm sure the cohos will be gone, might get the book anyway, sounds like a good read...
     
  6. Jason Baker

    Jason Baker Member

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    Use a 15-foot leader, a BIG ole' hook, enough split to get it down to their level, and strip right through the pod. They tend to bite right in the corners of their mouths.....
     
  7. hendersonbaylocal

    hendersonbaylocal Member

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    Seriously though, the fly Leland is talking about is killer. I picked one up at the Morning Hatch a while ago and it sat in my box for a while. Last fall we were out casting into this huge pod of silvers and throwing absolutely everything we had at them. Nothing worked until I remembered this little orange fly. Tied it on, strip, strip and boom... into a really nice fish right away. Of course the bite was off after that, but it worked for one of them.

    I've wondered if some steelhead flies like a skykomish sunrise would work....
     
  8. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    Well its saltwater and I have a baitcasting rod and snagging hook if I get that desperate :beathead:
     
  9. Jason Baker

    Jason Baker Member

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    Do we have a taker?
     
  10. ak_powder_monkey

    ak_powder_monkey Proud to Be Alaskan

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    They tend to bite large weighted trebles in various alternate mouths, beats not having fish in the freezer for the winter I guess
     
  11. Smalma

    Smalma Active Member

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    You have not seen "lock-jaw" coho until you chase the heavily pressured Puget Sound fish. That said I concur with the others that small flies are probably the best way to go.

    Most of my most successful flies are 3/4 to 1 inch long. I rely heavily on spiders with a variety of colors for bodies - yellow, black, purple, orange, pink, red, dark olive, chartreuse, and others. The hackle includes mallard, gadwall, and widgeon. I would say most years the best colors have been chartreuse, orange, and black. I also have good luck with a fly I call the fall muddler (see Les' cutthroat boat in orange or yellow. Smallish bait fish streamers and once in a while a larger flashy streamer can trick a fish or two.

    As important as the fly can be the retrieve - a fairly brisk retrieve with short individual strips is a good place to start and vary from there. Occassional have put the rod under my arm and stripped as fast as possible with good results.

    Constantly changing patterns/colors and retrieves is a neccesity with dozen of fly changes in a morning not uncommon at all. It seems once you find something that the fish will hit the pod quickly tries of the "hot fly" and a change is needed to trick another fish or two. I have also had some very good luck in manipulating by retrieve to achieve abrupt direction changes in the retrieve will triger some of those following fish- throw a large mend to the side or lower the rod and quickly raise it as the fly nears the boat/shore.

    Good luck - these lock-jaw coho have to be one of the most frustrating fish I chase - while days where the catch is measured in the dozens are possible most times a fish or two would have to be considered to be a good day.

    Tight lines
    Curt
     
  12. Jason Baker

    Jason Baker Member

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    Meanwhile, a drift fisherman catches 4 on a watermelon corkie and pink yarn....
     
  13. Jim Wallace

    Jim Wallace Smells like low tide.

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    I ran into a local up in Sequim while beach fishing Thursday morning, and he described his Dungeness River Coho flossing technique to me...small corkie on a 4 foot leader and enough pencil lead to get it down...swing thru the pod...hooks 'em in the corner of the mouth. He saw my flyrod and was probably trying to get a raise out of me. I didn't even blink, and we talked fishing for a bit. He gave up some good info on a couple of local spots.:cool:
     
  14. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Drift fishing in the salt water? I guess I've seen it basically done in hoodsport, but that's the exception for sure...

    The gear guys around here also complain about the lock jaw silvers. Especially in the snohomish system. When they do bite, they seem to have the best luck with:
    * Bright colored plugs (orange is popular) trolled
    * Tiny dick nite spoons fished slowly near the bottom
    * various jigs (buzz bomb types, and steelhead marabou types)
    * float fishing with herring or salmon roe

    For fly fishing, I use two extremes: big, bright, flashy, and fast retreive and then small, sparse, fished with slow strips and 3 to 6 seconds pauses.
     
  15. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    reminds of the guy who fishes 'black yarn flies' for silvers in the quilcene. He'll fish his fly rod or a drift rig setup.