martha (wb)

ceviche

Active Member
#2
Check the WDFW online planting reports. Go back a few years to see if any were planted between, say 4 years ago and the past year. If there browns were planted, say, three years ago, there's a good chance there are some JTs in there. At least as big as the one in your avatar. Historically, two-handers have been caught.
That said, it can be tough work finding them. You can spend all day making only one circuit of that lake. Believe me, I've done it a lot of times. On the upside, there is such a variety of structure on that lake, you can learn (the hard way) just about every aspect of stillwater trout fishing that you can hope to. Lord knows I've been schooled many a time there.
--Dave
 

ceviche

Active Member
#4
Okay. I decided to do your homework for you. The WDFW planted 2,500 brown and 10,282 cutthroat fingerlings, back in 2011. By now, the surviving browns should be of a very good size. Time to bring your "A-Game" to Martha, if you decide to take on the challenge.

To be honest, the worst time to fish Martha is right after a planting of new catchable fish. They just get in the way of the big ones. I seriously recommend fishing during the months from October and into January. That's when your odds of catching a big brown is greatest. I won't go into all the details why, but the feedbag is only one of the reasons.

All that seasonal stuff aside, the browns are there, and they should be of good size. If you aren't catching browns of at least 17", you're doing something wrong.

BTW, there are obviously cutthroats there. Thing is, they're the hardest ones to catch. They seem to be very specific eaters. What works with rainbows and browns will usually not work with them. I did catch an 18" cutt there, once--but that was more like something between an epiphany and a fluke when it came to my fly choice.

The thing about Martha that makes the hassle and multi-skunks worthwhile is that it's one of the few lakes where you can score a trifecta of trout. Is true!

--Dave
 
#5
Okay. I decided to do your homework for you. The WDFW planted 2,500 brown and 10,282 cutthroat fingerlings, back in 2011. By now, the surviving browns should be of a very good size. Time to bring your "A-Game" to Martha, if you decide to take on the challenge.

To be honest, the worst time to fish Martha is right after a planting of new catchable fish. They just get in the way of the big ones. I seriously recommend fishing during the months from October and into January. That's when your odds of catching a big brown is greatest. I won't go into all the details why, but the feedbag is only one of the reasons.

All that seasonal stuff aside, the browns are there, and they should be of good size. If you aren't catching browns of at least 17", you're doing something wrong.

BTW, there are obviously cutthroats there. Thing is, they're the hardest ones to catch. They seem to be very specific eaters. What works with rainbows and browns will usually not work with them. I did catch an 18" cutt there, once--but that was more like something between an epiphany and a fluke when it came to my fly choice.

The thing about Martha that makes the hassle and multi-skunks worthwhile is that it's one of the few lakes where you can score a trifecta of trout. Is true!

--Dave
Thanks Dave. Where did you get your info? I checked the past reports and they only said they planted rainbows. The planting plans however indicated they would plant browns, but the report with dates says only bows.
 
#6
Martha WB has received plants of 2,500 or more browns per year dating back to 2006:

Plant_13 Plant_12 Plant_11 Plant_10 Plant_09 Plant_08 Plant_07 Plant_06
2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 3,000 2,508 3,000 5,000

Pardon the sloppy graph, excel doesn't paste into here very well (so the 5,000 would be for 2006 and so forth)
 
#7
Martha WB has received plants of 2,500 or more browns per year dating back to 2006:

Plant_13 Plant_12 Plant_11 Plant_10 Plant_09 Plant_08 Plant_07 Plant_06
2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 3,000 2,508 3,000 5,000

Pardon the sloppy graph, excel doesn't paste into here very well (so the 5,000 would be for 2006 and so forth)
Maybe I am missing something here... why doesn't the DFW website report browns being planted? I've looked several times on: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/plants/weekly/past_reports.html
 
#8
Looks like they cut the archives short. Statewide section has 2 years of history. Used to be 10 or more. Hoping it's just hidden, they like to do that. Either way I've been recording all the brown trout data onto my own file for years. Never know when they'll pull stuff down. Did the same with all the lake bathymetric maps for the state...would really suck if they ever disappeared online.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater
#9
This is a useful site for finding things that aren't on the web any longer.
Type in the URL and you can look back over a number of years.
http://archive.org/web/web.php
Not a guarantee you'll find what you are looking for but it has helped me in a number of instances find useful info to help my fishing.
SF
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
#10
t it's one of the few lakes where you can score a trifecta of trout. Is true!

--Dave

One bow, one trip, one brown today, which isn't quite the trifecta but ok by me. Lots of swallows, one beaver, one eagle, three other fishermen. that's a fun lake for sure, if I knew more about chironomids...
 

skyrise

Active Member
#11
i agree with ceviche, its not the browns that skunk me. its the darn cutthroat. i have landed exactly 2 in all my time fishing there. both were about 6-8 inches. yet they plant a bunch of cutts in that lake ?
and there is a big lake up the road that gets browns planted in it. but with the wind and power boats i am not sure it would be worth it.
 
#12
Looks like they cut the archives short. Statewide section has 2 years of history. Used to be 10 or more. Hoping it's just hidden, they like to do that. Either way I've been recording all the brown trout data onto my own file for years. Never know when they'll pull stuff down. Did the same with all the lake bathymetric maps for the state...would really suck if they ever disappeared online.
Thanks for all the help everybody. We fished it today and caught a ton of browns and some rainbows on chironomids. The biggest fish landed was maybe 15". There were a lot of fish rising for most of the day.
 

Attachments

ceviche

Active Member
#14
Hey what part of the lake where you fishing

The picture should offer some help, if you've been to the lake before. Somewhere along the southern shore, for starters. But I've found myself having better overall luck elsewhere in the past. Then again, I've never been much of a chironomid angler.

BTW, finally back home! Just waiting for some personal business to clear before I start dragging out the fishing gear. Cousin in town, taxes, etc...

--Dave E.
 

ceviche

Active Member
#15
i agree with ceviche, its not the browns that skunk me. its the darn cutthroat. i have landed exactly 2 in all my time fishing there. both were about 6-8 inches. yet they plant a bunch of cutts in that lake ?
and there is a big lake up the road that gets browns planted in it. but with the wind and power boats i am not sure it would be worth it.

For cutts, try a brown micro leech--kind of like a micro-bugger thing. Size 14, 2x or 3x shank hook. I made a few, once, from Rhode Island Red hen hackle, and all it caught were cutts. Not big ones, but a good number of them. The big cutts were caught on a small, black, soft hackle thing I tied. Size 16 or 18? I just happened to toss it at some rises and got lucky.

--Dave E.