Minimum for two person lake boat?

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Josh, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. Josh

    Josh dead in the water

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    I live 5 minutes from Pass Lake. Now that the wife and I are learning to fly fish (so we can get her dad out of the house again), I figure it would be silly to not take advantage of having a fishing spot close by.

    What am I looking at spending to get into a boat that two people could fish out of? As uncool as I may sound with my ignorance, would a decent size aluminium rowboat work? If there is a reason, I would consider spending more to get a better/cooler drift or pontoon boat. However, at this point, I don't know that I'll be floating the Yakima. So starting out with something that will get me around Pass Lake is probably a better idea.

    Do people have to dual anchor when using a boat in a lake? Or if the wind is mellow enough, can you just drift a bit?
     
  2. Josh

    Josh dead in the water

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  3. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    I have a 12 ft alum that fits in the back of my truck. I can fit my wife and 3 boys in it for shorter trips.

    I can load and unload it just fine.

    Electric trolling motors really help (but not legal on pass I think).

    You can find them for $200 sometimes. Another $200 in battery + motor and other accessories and you'll have a decent small to medium sized lake fishing machine.
     
  4. ibn

    ibn Moderator

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    You can probably pull an aluminum boat with a geo metro if you wanted to, they're pretty light. You usually wench a boat onto a trailer, not sure why you'd need to hoist it. Do you have some sort of funky trailer in mind? I've got a 17' boston whaler that I launch by myself pretty often, it weighs around 3,000lbs...
     
  5. ibn

    ibn Moderator

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    Ahh sorry mis-read your post. No trailer. Yeah should be OK on a 12 foot boat by yourself so long as you don't have a big heavy outboard.
     
  6. Tony Mull

    Tony Mull Member

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    a 12 ft jon boat would be fine. i used to load my old 12 footer myself, but i did drag it around a bit. They are pretty tough. If you're just lake fishing a couple of creek company or other entry level pontoons could be had for $700 or less and way less if you go used. Course you gotta have fins and waders, but you "need" those anyway. You only need a better quality toon for rivers anyway. If you "need" to be together you can pretty easily link pontoons with some lengths of conduit and bungy cords to link the frames or just paddle around separately. You only need two anchors when fishing chronimids. I just use a 10 lb mushroom or downrigger ball and it works fine. anchor off the bow. Going for the 8 foot oars is money well spent too. Down side of a pontoon is that you can't stand up to cast, (or pee) but you gain mobility and portability as well as being able to use fins to position while fishing. You gotta put the rod down and row in a boat.
     
  7. Josh

    Josh dead in the water

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    Yeah, my thinking was that I'd just toss (?) it into the truck bed rather than spending the money for a trailer.

    Can two people fish from a 12 foot boat? A follow up question might be "Can two beginners not get tangled with each other when trying to fish from a 12 boat?".
     
  8. Scott Behn

    Scott Behn Active Member

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    Josh back in the early '90's I would take two of my buddies out with me to Pass Lake in a 14' jon boat, they were both learning to fling flies, and it was just fine. Never had any problems

    :cool:
     
  9. MrP

    MrP Member

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    Definitely.

    A very different question. In the beginning cast one at a time and if your partner is on your left, false cast on the right. In time you'll get so you can cast on either side safely and effectively. Be careful, be patient, be persistent and you'll have a good time growing in skills and confidence.
     
  10. Josh

    Josh dead in the water

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    True, the wader purchase is upcoming. But not wanting to get cheap-o ones, I'm saving for a bit. I'll have some before moving water opens up.


    Sorry for the confusion, but do you mean that you only need two anchors when fishing chronimids, and one anchor other times? That's what I took it to mean anyway. But it's been a long week, so I might be missing stuff.
     
  11. Tony Mull

    Tony Mull Member

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    yeah chronomids require two anchors, fore and aft because you want to keep the boat very still. Otherwise just one anchor is fine. Electrics are not legal on Pass. It can be an adventure with two people casting from a 12 footer when the action is fast and you are trying to false cast and get a dry fly back out. Normally you can just take turns casting and do fine. The launch at Pass is very shallow so a boat trailer as such is pretty useless. I just hauled mine on an old flatbed and slid it off and pulled it back on. A 12 footer doesn't weigh more than about 150 lbs if that. I'd still go with a couple of cheaper pontoons. You can even get by with hip waders for a while.
     
  12. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    The other nice thing with the 12 footer vs pontoons is that your wife can take a break, kick back, read a book, nap, catch some sun, while you keep fishing. Pass may not allow the elect motor, but other good lakes not far away will. I love standing in my boat letting the elect motor on the slowest setting take me along the bank casting to structure as I go. It's a great way to cover lots of water effieciently.

    You won't be afraid to take on a little more wind than a toon - especially if all you had were fins. A small elect motor 34-38lb thrust will cruise you along just fine. A small fish finder can be added pretty easily too.
     
  13. chadk

    chadk Be the guide...

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    Oh, and always were your hats and glasses - begginer or not. An enexpected side wind can put that back cast right in your or her face...
     
  14. spanishfly

    spanishfly Steelberg

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    Lavro makes a cool little boat. I haven't rowed one before but looks like a perfect little stillwater/class 1 boat. Check it out they have other models too.

    http://www.lavroboats.com/rf11.htm

    Dennis
     
  15. Josh

    Josh dead in the water

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    Cool, cool. Thanks for all the info so far.

    I'm sure that two cheap pontoons is the better way to go. But I'd rather just spend the $2-400 on an alum 12 ft if I can get away with it for now. That will leave me more money to decide between a tube or pontoon later if I/we want to upgrade.

    I also am not going to discount this as an advantage. The wife is pretty interested in fishing at the moment. But we all know how fickle that sort of thing can be. She does like books, boats and the outdoors though. So as long as the two of us can chill in the boat together, I think I'll be fine no matter what.