mohogany dun

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by luv2fly2, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. luv2fly2

    luv2fly2 Active Member

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    i want to tie a mohogany dun(dry) for the yakima. the problem is that i cannot find any pattern to copy. is the scientific name P. dibilis, family leptophlebiidae? dont know that means but just curios. this might be a dumb question but is there a wet fly or nymph that can be used?
     
  2. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Yeah, genus Paraleptophlebia, there are at least four species, P. gregalis and P. temporalis hatch in the spring and P. debilis and P. bicornutta in the fall. Almost any dark brown mayfly nymph pattern should work. If you're a stickler for accuracy, both nymph and dun have three tails and the nymphs have rather pronounced gills down both sides of the abdomen. Any standard dry fly style in the proper color should work for a dun imitation. I like comparaduns, sparkle duns or parachutes in a dark (mahogany) brown with a grey or blue-gray wing. Size 16 seems to be about right.
     
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  3. luv2fly2

    luv2fly2 Active Member

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    preston, thank you very much for the info. you must be a bio major as all the stuff on the thread was great.
     
  4. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    Naw, I've just been tying and fishing flies too long. The internet has made it very easy to pull up more information than anyone could possibly want. The data on species came from an article on mahogany duns by Dave Hughes and Rick Hafele on the Westfly website. By the way, Amato Publications is releasing a new book by Hafele and Hughes, called Western Mayfly Hatches, in May. It should be an excellent reference work.