Montana Boat Builders

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by Dan Soltau, Mar 26, 2006.

  1. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    I know quite few who have donea joint ownership and none still exist. They work for a couple years and hen one has to move, or in my case a tragedy struck and left 2 others with the boat and ome cunfusion on wat to do. And eventually someone wants to take it on a trip at the same time another wants to use use it. It could work though, but i would recommend buying one yourself.
     
  2. Josh Benjamin

    Josh Benjamin Member

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    Dan-don't take this wrong but i am just trying to picture a 13' boat with 3 guys in it and all the grilling gear, fishing gear, etc...i am more than anything just curious. i have a 16' boat and would like to do some multi-day trips in it and am concerned with room. bearing in mind my boat has virtually no designated storage, how does it all fit in an organized manner??
     
  3. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    I have done it before in a 16' boat s and had plenty of room. Plus these boats have much more space width wise than clackas or conventional drift boat, a foot at least on each side. I have tested and have done many trips in different types of boats with lots of stuff and i have a system that works.
     
  4. Steve S.

    Steve S. New Member

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    I agree it's a bit of a setup for conflict, especially if arrangements are done on a handshake and a smile. It might work if you had written rules agreed on by all members. Maybe a lottery system and a calendar to assign dates to assure equitable use. Buyin/buyout agreements if someone moves away or a new member joins. Work out some way to resolve disputes, how do you pay for damage, etc.

    I'd be leery about buying a $6-8k boat with 3 or 4 semi-strangers, but $1200-$1500 in materials for a homebuilt split say 4 ways isn't that big an investment. Most of us have probably dropped that much on a new rod & reel or a pair of waders.

    I'd build one for myself, but it's just hard to justify seeing as I have too many (homebuilt) boats already. And I'd have to convince my wife to row me down the river once or twice a month which is a tough sell, especially if she's 5 or 6 months pregnant ;)

    I agree with Josh 13' seems a little tight for 3. I've fished 3 from a 12 foot boat and it was cramped but doable and we wished we had a bigger boat. I think I'd want to step up to 14 or 15', but if you have good built-in storage and stay organized you could probably pull it off. As long as your clients don't want to lug along too much junk, I think that would be the key. You obviously have some experience with this though, and it sounds like you've thought this through. Good luck with your business, Steve
     
  5. Jergens

    Jergens AKA Joe Willauer

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    It can definately be done out of a 13 foot boat, i guide out of a 14' raft for steelhead, which has almost no dry storage. i dont know what the advantages of a shorter boat would be though, you can manuever a 16' boat anywhere a 13' boat can go, and you wouldnt lose that much weight going to a smaller boat. i think it would just be more cumbersom and cramped for you and your guests.
     
  6. TrappedinCO

    TrappedinCO Help! I'm trapped in a landlocked state.

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    The 13' boat is a lot narrower than MBB's guide models (48" I believe). That would be narrower than any Hyde or Clack out there. The wider boat will buy you a lot of stability and storage (nice for clients). The advantages of wood over glass are many and are discussed at length on the MBB board.

    I've been in and out of a lot of boats, big and small, and my vote would be to err on the big side, especially where clients are concerned. However, any way you go, you can't go wrong with those boats.

    For having an angler in the rear of the boat, you'll want to make sure that the hull can support that and still keep water flowing under the stern and not hitting the rear panel. Some hulls have more flotation in the rear and are built for fore and aft anglers, some hulls have less flotation in the rear and are meant for two anglers up front pulling plugs. Some small boats only work well with one angler up front.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  7. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    I wasnt saying it was wider, youll notice there are side panel storages on clacks that have almost no use except to take up space and take up a foot on each side. WOW, I have had a boat before and I dont want a 16' boat, no matter what you tell me I have used almost all shapes and sizes and I am able to efficiently fish and guide people out of this boat. I am mostly going to do special trips with 1 person and maybe two depending on the levels of experience. Please, dont post here to critisize my choice, as you guys have repeated yourself multiple times. JESUS
     
  8. Jergens

    Jergens AKA Joe Willauer

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    i think it was more suggestions so that you might be able to make a more informed decision, but your point is clear now. are you planning on guiding full time or more of a hobby guide? you should enjoy guiding, it has been a blast for me.
     
  9. Dan Soltau

    Dan Soltau New Member

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    Yeah, I will guide some close friends and some outside people, but not crazy guiding. I respect those guides but I am waiting till next summer for that. But I have considered the longer ones, but I am going to test them all out soon, so I will know for sure then. But for now 13'
     
  10. Hoglipstick

    Hoglipstick tailing looped

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    Dan,
    I guide in Western MT. Here are a few tips to help you out.
    The Montana Board of Outfitters has a downloadable guide application which you will need to fill out sign and have signed by a licensed outfitter which indicates that he will let you guide for him/her and he will stipulate those dates of employment. The application fee is $100
    Your requirements are that you have a current FIRST AID cert (CPR Cert is no longer a requirement) and no F&G violations. (if you don't have you can first aid cert. you can get it through the Red Cross (Msla RC holds a class that costs $65, takes a full day and must pass a 60 question test after). On the guide application there is a box you can mark that is a request for Boat tags. These tags are, in effect, your guide boat lic. I tend to laminate mine and grommet them and hang them off my oarlocks with a zip tie, so that I can move them from boat to boat as needed. Dan there are days (not often) that even 16' doesn't feel like enough room for certain clients. I have to agree that unless you are going to be guiding someone you are close friends with or already intimate with, - 13' might seem awefully small. Remember, that boat capacity is not necessarily your limiting factor. With a smaller boat, you will displace more water (deeper draft), you will pay for this when you are threading hydraulics, and picking your way through submerged rocks, etc.

    Typically, I keep a second rod rigged in for my clients in case we get into fish and they loose their fly at a critical time, or in case I want to be ready with a different pattern. At only 13', you may have trouble doing this and keeping your clients from breaking a rod.
    An outfitters lic. has requirements of (if memory serves right) 120 verifiable guide days, a $1,000 app. fee, a test for the type of endeavor you will outfit for (i.e., hunting fishing), and Verification of insurance (F.O.A.M. is a great org. to belong to for this, among other, reasons
    If you find someone to sign your guide lic and allow you to "contract" riverdays, then you will need to carry liability Ins. (a little on the spendy side, these days). Have new infant daughter and not sleeping much these days, so if I missed something, my apologies. Good luck.
    Rick
     
  11. Hoglipstick

    Hoglipstick tailing looped

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    Forgot to mention that MT. bord of Outfitters will allow you to get your lic. without First aid cert, but you must get within 90 days or they will revoke your lic.