NFR: Demise of Livestock killing Cougar

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Itchy Dog, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    Itchy, Thanks for the thread. I use to keep an eye on that issue but don't much anymore. We have a healthy population of cougars out here (Sno-Valley) and probably always will because their prey is in good supply out here in the country. I've had agents come thru our place tracking the cats and its fairly common that sheep and goats fall prey, they're an easy meal that's always available. It's amazing how secretive an animal of that size can be. Those guys were pretty lucky to find the cat not far away. I'm sure that agent can tell stories of many attempts to find the problem animal that come up empty handed. Several years ago a young female cougar took up residence in Carnation and was spotted around the elementary school and several other places around town. The houndsman couldn't find that cat for a whole week, when they did, she was right in the middle of town.
     
  2. knothead

    knothead Banned or Parked

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    Maybe the guy is smiling due to his prowess as a marksman, and for having disposed of the animal in a immediate and humane fashion. I see only one hole. Good shot. Given where the entrance wound is, I would judge that the animal died quickly and did not suffer. Left to it's own devices that cat would done away with the whole flock of sheep.
     
  3. Mel King

    Mel King Active Member

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    As far as the great tracking job goes,I would think that with a tracking collar on they knew exactly where the cat was. I want a tracking collar on that 25lb steelhead,not that it would do me any good except I'd know one was there.
    Mel
     
  4. Steven Green

    Steven Green Hood Canal Pirate

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    I'm assuming they didn't know it was the same cat they caught before, so the tracking collar would have been useless :thumb:


    Steven
     
  5. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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    Sad story. I'm all for the cougar getting another chance at "catch and release". What a shame. They could have moved the cougar anywhere remote, what the hell... just like the farmers in Wyoming killing the wolf recently. :beathead:
     
  6. Daryle Holmstrom

    Daryle Holmstrom retiredfishak

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    It's a freakin cat guys, mutiplying unchecked for five years now, only a matter of time before one lands on a kid. Hope it's not a grand kid. And another thing, this is a website for harvesting fish and wildlife, not another free willy and or green peace right , poor male lion screws up by killing another sheep and suddenly it should be let loose again??? I think these felines will be around here for the next few years since the tax payers of WA State voted the hound hunters out.
     
  7. Itchy Dog

    Itchy Dog Some call me Kirk Werner

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    You are correct, Daryle- they're going to be around in healthy numbers, which in time will become unhealthy numbers, occasionally dispatched by contract trackers being paid with our tax dollars. It's my opinion that the best thing to do would be to revoke the law banning hound hunting. That way the cats that are becoming problematic would likely be taken by a few, dedicated, specialized hound hunters who would play an important role in game management (like they used to).
     
  8. Kaari White

    Kaari White Active Member

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    Keep in mind folks... there are lots of people that feel the same way when they see pictures of you grinning with a fish in your hands!

    I hunt as well as fish. I kill a lot of birds every year with my dog and have plenty of pictures that look like the ones in this thread except with birds instead of a cat. What's the difference? I don't buy in to that cat being any more nobel than a pheasant.

    If you want to feel sorry for animals, please take a look at the way your chicken, beef and pork was raised. That cougar has a life in the wild and was even granted a second chance.
     
  9. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    For your information. It's open season on Wolf in Wyoming. But you can't kill them in Montana unless they are killing your livestock.

    My wife has seen a pack off of Hiway 41 between Silver Star and Twin Bridges. Now that is close to home.

    Jim
     
  10. dryflylarry

    dryflylarry "Chasing Riseforms"

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  11. cuponoodle breakfast

    cuponoodle breakfast Bigfoot is blurry

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    The only sad part of the story is that we paid someone to do it when there are plenty of guys who would buy a tag for the opportunity. That pic with the cougar on the guy's back really shows its size.
     
  12. Matt Burke

    Matt Burke Active Member

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    Man, I'd pay.
     
  13. djzaro

    djzaro New Member

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    So what happens when the area we relocate these cougars to is turned into a neighborhood? Then there old habitat is now a place they will be shot if they hunt there... which is what it was doing in monroe, his home. I'm not against killing them to keep us safe and thin the heard but at some point we can't just keep relocating, we have to learn to live with them. They are not coming into our cities, we are building in their habitat. Same gos for all wildlife. I am not an animal rights activist, accually I tend to hate their ambitions most of the time. But I thought this story was sad as I admire such majestic animals. I think eventually we will squeeze them out into the snow country( areas we won't build developments) and they will thin their own with our help because of limited habitats. Populations will fall then maintain at that level. It is a nessasary evil but needed, just made me sad to see such an animal killed for our sake.
     
  14. Loopy

    Loopy Member

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    iagree

    Lovely looking animal and truly wild. Could have done with a bit of C&R.
     
  15. junebug41

    junebug41 Junior Dave Monti fan

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    Where does one draw the line, Daryle? You appear to be of the camp that every animal posing any threat to humans should be eliminated. Would you be satisfied with just eradicating all bears and cats within, say, 20 miles of the nearest human dwelling? Or would you be most comfortable in a world where mankind has completed its work of eliminating such threatening animals entirely. Hey -- we're more than 90% of the way there, why not finish the job, right?

    The Mountain Lion roamed from the edge of the polar tundra in Canada to the southern tip of Argentina, and from the Pacific to the Atlantic, before being wiped out of most of its range in the 19th and 20th centuries because, hey -- it might get somebody's grand kid. I can't comprehend how anyone who appreciates nature isn't saddened by that. Maybe I assume too much to think that all flyfishers appreciate nature.

    This is not a political issue. It's simply a philosophical one about what kind of world you prefer to live in. Personally, I'm glad I won't be around to see the day that we've truly conquered every other living thing and made it completely "safe" to go into the woods.

    By the way, bees killed more people last year in this country than lions have in recorded U.S. history. Better grab a can of Raid and a flyswatter and get to work, folks!