NFR - Homebrew talk

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing Forum' started by Evan Burck, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. Charles Sullivan

    Charles Sullivan dreaming through the come down

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    I have 2 in the secondary fermentation stage right now. One is an IPA the other is a Mac N Jacks clone.

    My plan is to try to move to all grain prior to summer.

    I tasted the IPA on Tuesday when transferred it. I liked it. My friend transferred the M&J clone and sampled that. He said it was quite good as well. I'm really liking this homebrewing but I'd like to realize a little more cost savings by going to all grain.

    I'm sure some of you can expect a few more PM's in the near future as I try out new things.

    Go Sox,
    cds
     
  2. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    Any particular reason for the secondary? I really only do secondary on lagers, and beers with (real) secondary fermentations like my brett beer. Otherwise, you're actually just opening yourself up to increased possibility of infection and oxidation. Just let it sit in primary for about 3wks, and bottle/keg from there! No need to add extra steps that don't really help much.
     
  3. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson Yakbowbw

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    I am going to brew Friday with summer in mind. Nothing satisfies you more than a nice, light, crisp 7% rye after mowing the lawn or barbequing. I usually use ale yeast but this time I am going to use a lager yeast. I am also brewing a belgium honey ale... my personal favorite. I always kick it up a notch with extra honey, my goal for alcohol content is +9. My third brew will be a rye based ale that I turn into an IPA, I call it RyePA, again amped up to at least 9%. I haven't brewed since September 2010 and I am good and ready for the event. Why is it that many if not all fly fishermen seem to love all things beer? Some of the best brewers I know are fly fishermen. Must be our love of reading the water? :)
     
  4. Matt Smith

    Matt Smith On the river Noyb

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    I second Evan on the secondary, I used to secondary everything, but now I only secondary my long aging beers. Just keep it to one fermenter and life will be so much easier.
     
  5. theonethatgotaway

    theonethatgotaway Member

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    @guybg

    Your story is fanciful. Actually all beers were smoked flavored originally. You need heat to dry the malted grains quickly so they won't rot and the only heat source primitive humans had was direct heat with wood, that naturally generates a lot of smoke. Once people switched over to kilns to dry the malt out with indirect heat, beer lost it's smoke flavor. Beer has generally become lighter and lighter over time as well, as technology developed. What you had in Bamberg was no freak accident but a beer right out of history. Mmmm... delicious history....
     
  6. guybg

    guybg New Member

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    Like I said....I couldn't vouch for the story's accuracy...it's just the story they tell there.
     
  7. Charles Sullivan

    Charles Sullivan dreaming through the come down

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    The major reason is that the recipe that I am working off of directed me to do it. I really don't know what I'm doing yet. The nice thing is that I got to try my beverage. The better part was that I like what I tried.

    I just finished reading the complete joy of homebrewing. I got through that bitch in 2 days. That is the extent of my knowledge. Next time I may try your approach. It seems simpler and simpler is good. Especially if I do go to all grain.

    Any other suggestions? I usually figure I am the smartest man in the room, but I am sure that isn't the case for this subjet.

    Go Sox,
    cds
     
  8. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    Yikes... Honestly, forget everything you read. The book is a "classic," but incredibly outdated and will actually steer you in quite the wrong direction. I highly suggest "How to Brew" by John Palmer. Much, much, much better book. I read it after having brewed professionally, and brewing 100+ homebrew batches, and still learned some great stuff. I read "Complete Joy of Homebrewing" once after I already knew what I was doing, and it actually gave me a bit of a chuckle.
     
  9. Charles Sullivan

    Charles Sullivan dreaming through the come down

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    Jesus Burck. Can you tell my wife that she bought the wrong book? It won't go over well if I tell her.

    I'll try and pick up Palmer's book. I have a couple of human beings that can help me as well. So far I've just followed a couple of recipes from syrup. Hopefully I'll help a friend do an all grain batch soon (when his supply starts to look low) and come up with a mash tun/ lauter tun. From there I think I can figure this whole thing out and maybe save a little cash. Thanks for the advice. Like I wrote, some of you can expect a PM or 2 in the future.

    Go Sox,
    cds
     
  10. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    Hah, sorry. Anyways, the first edition of Palmer's book is on his website to read for free. Obviously, the second and third editions are much more complete, but it's still worth it for free: http://howtobrew.com/intro.html

    When you're ready to build a mash tun, let me know. I have a very simple design that I use for my mash tuns. Doesn't need to be the least bit fancy or expensive to make good beer.
     
  11. Charles Sullivan

    Charles Sullivan dreaming through the come down

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    Burck's giving me homework now. I'll have it done soon.

    Go Sox,
    cds
     
  12. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    just finishing mash out on my saison now. I'm also going to be starting a 5gal batch of traditional mead as well today. Been 2yrs since I did my last mead, figured I was due.
     
  13. Matt Smith

    Matt Smith On the river Noyb

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    Read the new "Yeast" book by Jamil Zainasheff too. Yeast is Thee most important ingredient, this book gives it it's due and is super informative. Thats after you read How to Brew. Also look up http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/ and listen to the podcasts. You will learn a ton!
     
  14. Evan Burck

    Evan Burck Fudge Dragon

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    All of these things are excellent suggestions! And if you're not making your own recipes yet, Jamil's book he wrote with John Palmer, "Brewing Classic Styles" is another must have.
     
  15. Matt Smith

    Matt Smith On the river Noyb

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    How did I forget to leave that one out?