NFR - Macro settings

Discussion in 'Photography / Video' started by mike doughty, Oct 9, 2004.

  1. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    I keep hearing about macro shots for pictures. how do i know if i have a macro setting for my camera. i can't seem to find anything in my user manual so either my camera does not offer this feature or i am blind. do all digitals have this feature? help please.
     
  2. Matt Burke

    Matt Burke Active Member

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    My digital is so old, there is a mount that screws on over the lens. To that, you screw in the Macro lens. If it doesn't say Macro, it probably isn't.
     
  3. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    so macro is a seperate attachment? then i guess i am SOL
     
  4. Black Shoes 12

    Black Shoes 12 New Member

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    Macro is a setting that lets you take close up shots. some cameras have it and others dont. what kind of digital do you have and i can probably tell you if you have macro or not. but as to a thing totally seperate depending if you have a digital point and shoot or a digital slr is depending on if it is a seperate thing. slr meaning just like the old film loading cameras you have to have a macro lense.
     
  5. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    I've got a samsung digimax 300, 3.2 megapixels
     
  6. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    I've had a few cameras (new and old) that have had them over the years. To date, they all have had the same symbol. Should be a "flower" symbol. If you have that, that'll probably be your macro. I do believe the camera you have should have it. Think my Mom has that camera (not sure) and I know hers has it.
     
  7. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    Thanks jerry, i know i have that flower symbol because it is always on my lcd whenever i turn on my camera and i keep turning the flower off. now that i know what i am looking for i found the flower in my book and sure a enough it says macro setting.
     
  8. SeanB

    SeanB New Member

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    oops
     
  9. Ron Eagle Elk

    Ron Eagle Elk Active Member

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    Some cameras have a better macro capability than others. To get really good pictures of flies, you need to be able to focus an inch or closer from your subject. The macro on my digital is fine for flowers, but is terrible for flies, it won't focus close enough.

    REE
     
  10. Bert Kinghorn

    Bert Kinghorn Formerly "nextcast"

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    After the Macro Setting

    Now that you have found that macro button, there a couple of things you can do that will significantly shorten your learning curve in close-up work.

    1. Good lighting really is important. There has been much discussion in earlier posts about the importance of lighting when photographing flies. Review it and then experiment lots until you find an arrangement that works for you. Supplimenting with natural light helps to keep colors true, but requires care in positioning to prevent shadows on the subject.

    2. Use a tripod (or some other way to hold your camera steady). When photographing objects this close, ANY motion will translate to significant image blur. The tripod will also let you set the camera and subject up and then play with the lighting until you get it right. If you do not have a cable release, the self-portrait timer installed in your camera will let you shoot without moving the camera when you press the shutter release.

    Happy shooting, Mike!
     
  11. Old Man

    Old Man Just an Old Man

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    Hey Mike. You got to read the directions that came with the camera in order to understand what you are dealing with. But being that it is just you with the problem I can understand. :p :p

    Jim
     
  12. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    yah, yah, yah
     
  13. MacRowdy

    MacRowdy Idaho Resident Craftsman/Artisan

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    Sound Macro Advice Bert.

     
  14. mike doughty

    mike doughty Honorary Member

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    well i don't have a tripod so i guess i had better control myself when trying to snap the photo.
     
  15. estill

    estill Member

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    Try a bean bag or a zip lock bag full of rice. They are soft enough to position your camera at an angle yet solid enough to hold it there.