Nymph Fishing

Discussion in 'Stillwater' started by rlight, Mar 10, 2009.

  1. Creatch'r

    Creatch'r Heavies...

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    if you dump a tip on your uncut WF floater it is going to cast like crap. especially considering you are most likely throwing a 4-6wt rod for your trout. try a poly leader instead or man up and pick up some spools and different lines.

    these questions come up A LOT and i think the general consensus is no.... you cant do everything with your floater. at some point an intermediate full sink and another type III or IV or even V full sink is what is desired for stillwaters. you will be hard pressed to find situations you cant handle with 3 lines to choose from.

    besides the fly on the end of your tippet, your line is what makes it happen. without the proper presentation you are goin home fishless. lines if taken care of will last several seasons (or longer!) so bite the bullet and get it done. you wont regret it.

    good luck my man!
     
  2. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    I agree with Sean.
    Having a floating, intermediate and full sink lines will provide you with the best chances for success. Those lines would pretty much cover every stillwater situation.
     
  3. Tim Lockhart

    Tim Lockhart Active Member

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    Echo Sean. I wouldn't bother showing up in stillwater w/o a full sinker. 80%+ of my time on lakes/ponds is spent using a Type V density compensated full sink (falls in a straight line). I tend to use that at most depths, including shallow, and I don't even bother with a slow/intermediate line. One rod, one reel, two spools (1 float, 1 fast sink), that's it. And anymore, if I'm not pitching dry flies I'm probably not using a floater. I tell most guys to start w/ 2 lines, a floater & Type IV full sink. Then decide over time if you want another sinker, maybe a Type II. But it's like a 6 iron. You can leave it home and still play golf. Check out the SA Mastery series. Good luck!
     
  4. _WW_

    _WW_ Geriatric Skagit Swinger

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    There is a distinction between sink tips and sinking leaders. A sink tip is a piece of an actual flyline-complete in most cases with the braided core. A sinking leader is a piece of monofilament with a sinking coating applied.

    Usually a sink tip will alter the way a line that it is attached to casts. To restore the line to casting like it should the front taper and part of the belly are removed and replaced by the sink tip.

    With the sinking leaders you can usually attach these right to your line without making any alterations to it and your cast will be affected only slightly if at all.

    I have and still use the Rio sinking leaders. Other than a few lines I keep as strictly for dry fly use, I've looped the end of most of my lines. When I do this, I remove some of the taper to help the line turn over right to the loop. At the loop I can attach either a regular mono leader or one of the Rio sinking leaders.

    I usually go out with 3-5 rods depending on the season and the expected weather and will have them all rigged up differently. I like using the Rio sinking leaders for casting towards shore or when fish seem to be suspended shallow over deeper water. If you can only afford to buy one, get the longer one. You can always make it shorter if you feel the need.
     
  5. Krystoff

    Krystoff Member

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    In regards to having a single reel and multiple spools, how hard is it to change them out? Keep in mind I sit in a belly boat at this time cause I haven't found a v-style float tube or pontoon boat in my price range yet.
     
  6. Stonefish

    Stonefish Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater

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    Changing spools while in a float tube is pretty easy but a pain if you do it multiple times during the day. Do it in shallow water so you can recover your rod or spool if you drop them.

    I've been using a Super Fat Cat for the past five years. I can take three rods set-up ready to fish (floater, intermediate and sinker). Very convenient and they aren't in the way.
     
  7. rlight

    rlight Member

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    Thanks to all of you, I appreciate your help.

    rlight
     
  8. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    Isn't trolling a dragon fly nymph or damsel fly nymph, nymph fishing in a lake? That can be very fast action way to fish. Fishing chironomids is also nymph fishing and fishing chironomids under an indicator can be very fast and exciting fishing at time. However the Old Man is correct fishing a nymph under an indicator can be boring at times.

    Keith
     
  9. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    I always change reels or spools right next to the shore. I've never lost anything yet but had a friend loose a rod and reel by trying that trick in the middle of a lake. Some big bucks went down to the bottom of the lake.

    Keith
     
  10. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    When fishing a lake, getting to the right depth is important. I sometimes use floating line if there is lots of surface action. I also use a sink tip, medium sink line, and fast sink line to make sure I get to where the trout are. Most smaller lakes in Washington can be fished with floating and sink tip line.

    Keith
     
  11. golfman65

    golfman65 Guest

    When your in a kickboat most have the aprons you put across in front of you, you shouldn't have any problem changing a spool unless you are handicapped...Here's a hint...your rod comes apart so you can run the line through again pretty easy...

    I also carry three spools, dry, clear intermediate and full sink...I use the dry and clear the most..hell I use the dry for almost everything as I'm normally chironie fishing. Instead of worrying about sink tips, tie some of your flies with bead heads and use a longer leader or add more tippet..
     
  12. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    Golfman:
    Us old people are clutzee. We go to the shallows to protect our investment.

    Keith
     
  13. Creatch'r

    Creatch'r Heavies...

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    i can change out a spool and string my rod in a hurricane in less than 3 minutes. its easy (and not dangerous) if youve done it a few times. as with everything in a float tube there is a learning curve. ie pissing, landing fish, drinking, eating, casting....

    (knock on wood)
     
  14. Keith Hixson

    Keith Hixson Active Member

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    But when your as old as me you become senile. :beathead:

    Keith
     
  15. wolverine

    wolverine Member

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    Changing spools is easy. Reel the leader in so its close to the reel. Use a rubber band or a clothes pin to hold the leader against the rod so the leader stays put. Clip the leader off at the fly line, re-tie the leader to the new spool. Swap spools. Takes all off a minute to do. No re-stringing through the guides needed.