olive willy or red olive willy

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by luv2fly2, May 12, 2009.

  1. Tim Cottage

    Tim Cottage Formerly tbc1415

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    Silver lined is best.

    TC
     
  2. luv2fly2

    luv2fly2 Active Member

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    possibly the red bead is a fish egg or maybe a gill or blood of something dying. what ever it is it is a fish catching fly. but i found a better fly which i will test fish this friday.. mike w
     
  3. Jerry White

    Jerry White Active Member

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    Here is the article Stewart refrenced about the Olive Willy and the Bager Lk Contest.

    One-Fly generates buzz in trout circles

    May 17, 2009 in Outdoors, Spokesman Review
    Rich Landers

    http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2009/may/17/one-fly-generates-buzz-in-trout-circles/

    The frazzled Olive Willy fly pattern earned this trophy for Bill Lundin after catching 15 trout in the Spokane Fly Fishers’ One-Fly fishing contest at Badger Lake on May 9.

    It’s a contest of confidence, durability, technique and presentation.

    We’re not talking about “Dancing with the Stars,” but rather the Spokane Fly Fishers’ annual One-Fly fishing contest, which attracted 25 participants May 9 at Badger Lake.

    Bill Lundin of Spokane won the event by catching and releasing 15 trout between 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on a soft-hackle attractor pattern called the Olive Willy.

    In past events, Lundin chose patterns such as the Bloody Mary and Stillwater Nymph, but he pre-fished Badger Lake two weeks ago and found the size 12 Willy to be a top performer among the flies he tested.

    “I learned about the pattern from Al Peterson of Swede’s Fly Shop (in Spokane),” Lundin said. “It resembles a damselfly nymph, with a pheasant rump hackle, olive chenille body, yellow marabou tail and a red bead head. I got the instructions and tied some up.”

    Winning a one-fly contest requires finesse, and a fine line between a leader that’s thin enough to avoid a trout’s detection yet strong enough to handle anything Badger Lake could deliver.

    Lundin’s 4X tippet withstood a 23-inch rainbow he netted after five minutes and hoisted for a photograph before releasing it back into the lake.

    His fly was looking sparser and bedraggled as the contest concluded, but was still catching fish right up to the end, he said.

    The winning technique involved a Cortland clear-tip intermediate fly line he trolled in shallow water from his personal pontoon with the help of an electric motor.

    “It seemed that the people who did the best were those who covered more water, trolling,” Lundin said. “Sounds like trolling might not be allowed next year,” he added with a smile and a shrug.

    “This is funny,” said Jeff Voigt, who took time out from his fishing to photograph Lundin with his biggest fish. “I was using the same fly and not doing nearly as well as Bill, but I wasn’t using an electric motor.

    “Fifteen years ago, I won the one-fly contest by catching 42 fish at West Medical Lake in two hours. I was trolling, and the club decided that wasn’t the way to go. But that was then, and now nobody remembers that.”

    Peterson said the Olive Willy was concocted around 1990 as the signature fly for his shop, which was then located in Woodinville, Wash.

    “We looked at good flies, such as the Carey Special and the Six Pack and make changes and improvements,” Peterson said. “For instance, the body of the Six Pack gets torn up after you catch a few fish, so we used chenille, which is more durable.”

    One of the shop’s fly tiers, William Survey, took the lead and came up with the idea for the red bead head, Peterson said. “So it’s named after him. The key is the color of the rump, the fluorescent yellow.

    “We sold 650 dozen of the pattern last year,” he said. “It’s the most popular fly we sell in the shop.”

    Lundin won a $30 gift certificate good at several area businesses for his performance. “I think it’s only right that I use it at Swede’s,” he said.
     
  4. FT

    FT Active Member

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    Don't all of you who know William just love the way someone else takes partial (or most depending on your take on the quote in the article) for this very productive fly of his? This is the big reason I quit posting dressings or photos for flies I've developed. I had a fly I developed with the input of John Saddler ripped off by someone who claimed it was his after he bought some at a fly shop I tied them for. The kicker is that he now gets paid for the exact pattern John and I developed back in 1992 from one of the offshore import fly companies. It is rather maddening when it happens. I sort of sounds like this same thing has happened with William's OLIVE WILLY. Why is it so hard for some to give the originator of a fly credit for doing so?
     
  5. Tarkin

    Tarkin Member

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    So what's the best way to fish the Willy? Floating line, or sink it?
    Strip it in slowly just below the surface? I was under the impression that the fish in lakes mostly reside down deep...
    If you've had luck with it, what was the way you fished it when it was most productive?
    I guess I don't really understand a "searching" pattern. Do you use it to explore an area until you get a hit then switch to something else? I've often heard that phrase for brighter attractor patterns. Maybe someone can enlighten me.
    Thanks
     
  6. Coach Duff

    Coach Duff Banned or Parked

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    Everyone has a "special method" but in lakes William and me liked a 15-18 foot flouro leader in 5x or 6X. William used a hand over hand retrieve with two kicks and and the subsequent drift. Fish often hit on the fall of the fly. Sometimes we anchored up and worked it with slow 3-4 strips and then gave it a nice tug or "pop" imitating the dragon fly nymph taking off. Fish often hit that on the drop also just as they do with all dragon imitations. My favorite way of all was in Elle Lake during it's good days years ago. I would kick up to the top of the lake with a type 5 sink and long flouro leader and just wind drift down to the bottom. The Willie would barely touch the tops of the weed beds under me, snagging every blue moon. It was mindless, lazy day trolling and just as I was ready to take a nap my rod would get slammed and wake me into laughter. I would do this all day. One day William and I landed over 30 trout over 18 inches doing this. Each of us landed over 15 pigs. We drove back to Seattle in silence which is something neither William or I ever seemed to be able to do for long. Completely satisfied, happy, silly, "things really went our way today" silence. It was a drive and mood I'll always remember for it's perfection. Hope that helps. Coach
     
  7. scottflycst

    scottflycst Active Member

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    A strip and pause retrieve on a clear intermediate line works well for me. You'll have to fish different depths to find the fish, but when you do fish of all education levels will take the Olive Willy.
     
  8. bighugetrout

    bighugetrout New Member

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    Long live the Olive Willy! I'm not surprised certain individuals have taken credit for William's fly. He's a generous man to a fault. I'll pass this post along to him.


    [​IMG]
     
  9. Reelucky

    Reelucky New Member

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    You keep talking like William is dead. What gives? I am new to this forum and like many others became friends with William at Swede's, fished with him and learned to enjoy getting through that crusty exterior.

    I haven't spoke to him in years. He is still alive and well...?
     
  10. bighugetrout

    bighugetrout New Member

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    He's alive and well up north on Whidbey Island.
     
  11. Reelucky

    Reelucky New Member

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    Wonderful. Good to here. Whidbey huh? Thought he would have moved near his favorite lake on Bainbridge.
     
  12. bighugetrout

    bighugetrout New Member

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    He looked for homes at Lone Lake but they were out of his price range. If you'd like to contact him, send me a pm and I'll reply with his info. He would love to hear from his old friends.
     
  13. Reelucky

    Reelucky New Member

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    TY I know the red headed UPS child would want talk to him as well.