Outcast vs. Dave Scadden vs. Buck's

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by salmotrutta77, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. salmotrutta77

    salmotrutta77 New Member

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    I'm looking for a 9-10ft. pontoon and am leaning toward a boat w/standup option and was looking at Outcast 10ir and Scadden Madison boats does anyone know the differences between the two pros/cons? also , if i were to go conventional without standup feature which boat would u recommend between these 3? Outcast Panther, Buck's Bronco or Scadden Madison River? any help would be much appreciated or if u have any other suggestions, feel free. thanks jon.
     
  2. Trout Master

    Trout Master Active Member

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    I have a Outcast pac900 that I picked up new last year. I use it for lakes , I have it rigged with 4 rod holders a depth sounder and electric trolling motor. Plus a cooler for refreshments and sandwiches. Love the boat. Cant stand up in it but I'm fine with that. I still have a Bucks southfork II ,I like the Outcast better as you are higher out of the water.
     
  3. Mark Yoshida

    Mark Yoshida Active Member

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    Holy crap TM. I thought I carried alot of stuff. I also have a wheel attachment and carry an anchor. :rofl: Just no animals.
     
  4. Trout Master

    Trout Master Active Member

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    Oh I have a anchor along I just dont use it much. I havent got a wheel for it yet.
     
  5. Bill Aubrey

    Bill Aubrey Active Member

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    Hell, TM, sounds like you'll need wheelS, as in not just one. I have a Scadden Madison River that I bought before the standing platforms came along. I love it. It has been down the Deschutes in March and handles class 3 easily. I will keep it in the arsenal, even though I have gone frameless with Scadden.
     
  6. Trout Master

    Trout Master Active Member

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    Have a trailer for it, can carry up to 4 pontoons.
     
  7. themaninthemoon

    themaninthemoon Just waiting on warmer weather, .......

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    Posted by TroutMaster:Re: Outcast vs. Dave Scadden vs. Buck's

    Have a trailer for it, can carry up to 4 pontoons.

    Cool! I wanna go, can I go with, huh? Pretty please?
    I promise I'll be good, ....Honest!
     
  8. Trout Master

    Trout Master Active Member

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    Cool! I wanna go, can I go with, huh? Pretty please?
    I promise I'll be good, ....Honest!

    NO.
     
  9. themaninthemoon

    themaninthemoon Just waiting on warmer weather, .......

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    Geez-o-whiz, ......?......?...TroutMaster, you ain't got to be so blunt about it, do ya? ......I might even offer to sit back there on the trailer, iffn you'd let me come along too?

    Oh! Nevermind! (grumble, grumble, ya ol' grumpybutt, meany grumble,sorehead, grumble), I didn't wanna really go anyhow, 'sides I'm way over here in Indiana, & that's a real far piece for you to drive over here to pick me up anyway. LOLOLOL

    And anyways, I got my own trout pond about a 1/4 mile to the north from where I live anyways, but I can catch Lake Perch, Small Mouth Bass, two/three different species of Salmon, & @ least two, maybe three, different species of Trout.
    Some folks around here call my troutpond, "The Lake", or some even call it Lake Michigan.
    LOLOLOL
    Hoosier friend,
    John
     
  10. davec

    davec Member

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    If you are going to do Class III and IV water, I recommend a high quality framed boat. I have a Outcast PAC 900FS and am very pleased with it in the 'white stuff".
     
  11. UptheCreek

    UptheCreek Member

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    Look into bigskyinflatables. Don't own one yet but that would be my first choice.
     
  12. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    I've owned pontoons by all three makers although not the exact models you indicated. Here's my overall impressions of each maker.

    Buck's Bags. The only stainless steel frames (that I'm aware of) available. Their boats are bulletproof and great for salt water use. Sadly, Buck's doesn't appear to be as innovative as they once were so their product offerings are pretty much the same as they've been the past 3-4 years. Their standing platform looks even more ungainly that the Scadden design.

    Scadden. Innovative designs but his attention to detail is a bit frustrating, especially at the price he charges. As an example, the stainless footrests on his Skykomish Sunrise frame, while removable, are NOT adjustable. If you've got long legs, putting your feet on the footrests while you row means the oar handles will bump your knees, if they clear your knees at all. Installing the side pockets on the same boat means that the oars will rub across the tops of the pockets since the oar towers appear to be about 1" too short. The folding standing platform lean bar won't fold all the way back if you've got anything more than about 1 foot tall on the rear deck. The lean bar then interferes with your elbows when you're rowing. These are small things that are minor annoyances. But taken together, they make me wonder how much time Dave actually spent testing his prototype designs? Or did he simply rush them into production to minimize expenses? How much more could longer footrests and two extra sets of holes have added to production costs?

    Outcast. Originally the lesser-quality of the two boats built in Boise (Buck's Bags being the other), since being purchased by Aire, they've introduced a slew of innovative new models. Their frames are bulletproof with well thought-out, ergonomic designs that actually fit real people, unlike Scadden's. Their quad-tube pontoons ride low in the water (minimizing the 'sail' effect), while providing an additional margin of safety that is unavailable in any other bladder-and-shell tube design. I haven't tried their standing platform models, so have no input on how they compare with the heavy and ungainly Scadden design.

    If I were you, I'd consider building a 'custom' boat by buying an Outcast Ferrari-series frame (with or without a standing platform and rear deck, as you prefer) and then mating it with a pair of 10' Maxxon dual-chamber, bladderless tubes. The Maxxon tubes are a couple of light-years better than any of the bladder-and-shell designs but at about the same cost. Finish it off with a set of Cataract 7-1/2' Mini-Mag oars and you'll have a kick-ass boat for about the same price as the out-of-the-box boats by any of the makers you mentioned.

    K
     
  13. BDD

    BDD Active Member

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    Kent provides a very good, non-biased review of the three makers and I agree with pretty much every thing he says. I'll second the comment about Maxxon tubes being far better than any cloth shell and bladder tubes.
     
  14. Denny

    Denny Active Member

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    What makes the Maxxon tubes better or far superior to the others?
     
  15. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    Like float tubes, most consumer pontoon tubes use a two-piece design featuring a vinyl or PVC bladder zipped inside a thin shell of coated nylon or PVC. Lightweight and inexpensive to manufacture, this design is effective for stillwater or casual river use, making it practical and affordable for most consumers.

    So-called bladderless tubes use designs, materials and assembly technology like that found in rafts (think NRS, Maravilla, etc.), Watermasters, or serious whitewater catarafts (like those from Aire). Bladderless tubes are made from very heavy PVC material with RF sealed seams, reinforced at either end and typically with a laminated 'rub strip' on the tops to minimize abrasion by frame shift, and 'skid plates' on the bottom to prevent damage when dragged across rocks or gravel. Air is pumped directly into each tube or chamber, eliminating the need for an inner bladder.

    Sizes 10' and longer are typically made with an inner bulkhead across the middle of the tube, dividing it into two chambers, fore and aft, with separate valves for each chamber. Dual chamber tubes provide an extra margin of safety in case one chamber fails or is breached by a rock or limb.

    Bladderless tubes are neither lightweight or cheap, but are definitely the best tubes available. If I was gonna spend several days floating down a river, fishing and camping along the way, bladderless tubes are the only ones I'd consider.

    K