Overhang Opinions?

Discussion in 'Spey Clave' started by Jim Darden, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. Jim Darden

    Jim Darden Active Member

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    I find that some lines work better with a little bit of overhang when casting and others don't tolerate it at all. I can't seem to gel the theory of when to use it and when not to.....any thoughts on the subject???
     
  2. cmann886

    cmann886 Active Member

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    My e xperiences are the same. In my case, it seems to have a lot to do with anchor placement/stick while keeping tension. Some heads are short enough a little hang over helps a lot.
     
  3. fisshman26

    fisshman26 Active Member

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    Are you talking full integrated lines or just heads?
     
  4. tridentfly

    tridentfly Active Member

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    My experience has been that overhang relates to the length of the head - shorter head, more overhang. So for some of the shorter skagit heads I need a lot of overhang to cast it easily on a long rod. Similarly if you're casting a really long head, you'll want less overhang.
     
  5. Idaho steel

    Idaho steel Active Member

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    Head length is less relevant than taper. A Nexcast-70 has no rear taper and needs several feet of over hang. Conversely, my old Bill Drury Impact spey-74's have a fifteen foot rear taper, and were designed to cast with the the back of the taper in hand. The Airflo Delta likes a bit of overhang, but the Ballistic Vectors work a bit better with some of the rear taper inside the guides...

    When you add overhang, you are effectively increasing the rear taper of the line which decreases the mass of the d-loop and speeds up the rods tempo. Different rods have different actions/tempos so there are no hard and fast rules, it's simply a question of matching the lines taper to the rod.
     
  6. fisshman26

    fisshman26 Active Member

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    When you add overhang, especially with a head, what you are doing in effect is tricking the rod, because you have less weight inside of the guides on the rod the rod can recover faster and also make the rod seem faster on the forward cast. If you are having issues with overhang its most likely that you have slack line in your cast somewhere.
    As a side note one of the very best distance casters that I know would use as much as 12-18ft of overhang with his 67ft head........food for thought :)
     
  7. Jim Darden

    Jim Darden Active Member

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    Wow...lots of good input there. I have limited experience with long rods (I don't own one over 14 ft) but the ones I have tried seem to cast the 75 ' heads better with overhang. That really puzzled me. Based on what I'm hearing, it seems to be more a function of rear taper, be it head or integrated line. Now I need to find some water that is open to try a few experiments. guess I need to drive a way to get some exercise.....
     
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  8. 4sallypat

    4sallypat Active Member

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    Yes, this thread was helpful!

    I am having an issue casting a 15' 10wt rod and playing with the overhang.

    Currently setup using a 30' Skagit Max Long line with Lazar shooting line but the casts become more difficult due to the weight of the rod compared to my trout speys..

    My instructor says the rod is better suited for mid and long belly lines.
    So I got some demo lines coming in from Gaelforce.

    Will report back on a different thread using longer heads on the big stick...
     
  9. golfman44

    golfman44 5-Time Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year

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    This is spot on.

    Also take into account your rod action, specifically the tip. Stronger tipped rods (think something like a meiser MKS/X) might need more mass to get the rod loading, i.e. less overhang. Not always true but something to think about. This is also why there are some rod/line combos that are simply awesome...(nextcast on a mks/x for example)

    Of course how deep you are wading, casting stroke, tension, etc. all matter a lot too.

    Just experiment with each rod/line combo and find your sweet spot. When you start tapping out some nice casts just stick with that overhang and focus on the hook set you're about to need
     
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  10. Jason Chadick

    Jason Chadick A Fish, A Fish, A Fishy, Oh...

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    I adjust my overhang according to how deep I wade. The deeper I wade the less overhang/more head is inside the guides. I also adjust the amount of overhang according to what type of cast I’m using. I also adjust overhang according to what type of d-loop and casting loop I am trying to achieve.

    In short, there are many variables to take into account when figuring out overhang. The more you fish the same rod/line combo, the more variables you will dial in.
     
  11. Chawhee

    Chawhee Active Member

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    Sounds like your head is too short for the length of rod not a question of overhang. Longer rods 14'+ need something like a Skagit max long, nextcast winter authority etc.


    As for less overhang, that totally depends on a number of variables.

    Shooting head vs integrated line?

    How deep are you wading?

    Are there any obstructions like a high bank or tree that would prevent casting like you normally would?

    What is length/ wt of your sinktip/ poly leader?

    What is the length of the leader going from your tip to the fly?

    What is the mass of the fly relative to head weight and sinktip?

    Is the grain wt of head enough to sufficiently load the rod at applied power level?

    All of these things, and many more, play a part in finding the optimal overhang for whatever rod/line/application.

    Thanks for trying to help though.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2017

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