overhang

hydrological

beads are NOT flies and snagging is just ghetto
#1
with integrated lines, is there an advantage? or is having an inch or two of the rear taper inside the tip a plus? why?
 
#2
Overhang is not just for shooting heads. You want to maximize your D loop to get the most power out of your rod. An inch or 2 won't make a difference, a foot or 2 will. The amount of overhang I use varies with rod-line-tip combos but rarely exceeds 3'. I only bring the rear taper inside the guides if I'm casting in tight quarters, if it's super windy, if the rod feels over-lined, or if I didn't eat my wheaties that morning ; )
 
#3
When I the rear of the head is anywhere from a couple feet inside up to maybe 4' outside of the tip. Overhang just varies D loop size. Large D-loops are for distance, small D-loops are for when you're backed up against the river bank/brush/rocks/trees.
 

hydrological

beads are NOT flies and snagging is just ghetto
#4
hmmm, seems like what i want to do naturally. was really wondering if anyone kept it constant. i seem to vary mine mostly to compensate when i wade deeper. and the obvious short range stuff, one reason i went the integrated route. but it does seem to feel a little tighter to me when i'm a few inches into the back taper, is that having the head weight closer to the tip? does a more gradual rear taper make a difference?
 
#5
hmmm, seems like what i want to do naturally. was really wondering if anyone kept it constant. i seem to vary mine mostly to compensate when i wade deeper. and the obvious short range stuff, one reason i went the integrated route. but it does seem to feel a little tighter to me when i'm a few inches into the back taper, is that having the head weight closer to the tip? does a more gradual rear taper make a difference?
When you wade deep, you are basically shortening your D-Loop. If you use the same amount of overhang, you have to drift into a higher stopping position to form that same D-Loop. If you shorten your overhang, you are making it easier by compensating for that length. There is nothing wrong with either method, its up to you to decide which is better for you. When fishing scandi heads or mid-bellies, I do not change my overhang unless there is an obstruction that does not allow for it, but when casting chickens with a skagit head, I usually just shorten the overhang. When wading really deep I even drop my top hand lower on the spey rod to give another inch. By really deep I mean to my chest. You will find that each rod and line combo will act differently and depends on how you like the spey rod to load.

If I am understanding your question regarding rear taper correctly, a gradual rear taper has fewer grains and tapers into the running line, thus it will make a difference, but not as much as if there was a less gradual rear taper. If you pull move line into the guides, you will be eliminating grain weight from your rod to overcome in your casting stroke. If you feel like the rod casts better with the rear taper in the rod guides, you might want to try a lighter line.
 
#7
More "overhang"--leaving more line mass further away from the rod tip--requires a more linear rod tip path, but narrows both your D and forward loops--desirable in some (but not all) situations.
 

Greg Holt

Active Member
#8
+1 on Robert Easterday's thought.

Additionally, more overhang seems to delay turnover somewhat (probably as a result of the "more linear rod tip path" Robert mentions).

On some of the new very aggressive taper designs with little rear taper (Airflo Rage is a good example), adding a 3 or 4 foot "rear taper extender" works wonders on performance and turnover, especially in combination with mono shooting line and a shorter (<13') rod. They're easy to construct out of old junk lines, just match your intended diameters as closely as possible. You'll be able to reduce the applied force and abruptness of the cast with a noticeable improvement in flight characteristics.

No intent here to hijack the thread, just wanted to mention this as it relates to overhang.
 
G

golfman65

Guest
#9
I have some questions for the experts?

What are you fishing for that requires you to deep wade (chest deep? and cast?)
when your chest deep are you really thinking about your overhang and loop size?
what is it about a spey rod that seems to take all common sense out of your normal fishing skills?

Overhang speeds up your line and can give you tighter loops with shooting heads...shooting heads can be any length if you cut the running line off....
Longer bellied lines require on some rods that you find the "Sweet spot" on your rod...this could be anywhere from a couple feet outside the tip down to your bottom hand inside the rod...
By cutting the running line off these lines you can put a mono loop on the back and work your way down the rear taper till you find the spot on your rod that is perfect.. ( you have dialed in your line) put a braided loop on or if skilled weld your own loop and your good to go...

Used to be the only way you could find out how a long line worked was to step it down in your rod to find the best casting spot...now everything is run and gun it seems..
 

James Mello

Inventor of the "closed eye conjecture"
#10
I wade to my chest quite a bit. Try fishing the Sol Duc outside of the Whitcom Dimmel stretch. In a lot of cases you need to be able to wade to water up to your chest with super tight quarters, or you wouldn't be able to fish at all..
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
#11
It seems to me that each rod, each line and each caster is going to have a bit of a difference in how much "overhang" will be the best and working it out on the water is the only way to figure it out. A tip; once you find how much works best for you and this will change from day to day, location to location, use a little less overhang when in slower water, a little more when in faster water.

Don't over think this shit. Get on the water and figure out what works for you.

I hate wading to my chest and avoid it if I can.
 
G

golfman65

Guest
#12
I wade to my chest quite a bit. Try fishing the Sol Duc outside of the Whitcom Dimmel stretch. In a lot of cases you need to be able to wade to water up to your chest with super tight quarters, or you wouldn't be able to fish at all..
Ok..that's a good point...I did think of a couple spots I waded waist deep because of a back eddy.
and on a mighty river up north I know a guy who will wade that deep to reach a far seam that fish do hang in...
pet peeve is all the newer guys I see who wade out past the fish so they can cast to the other side where there are no fish...

I'm like you kerry...in close and stay dry is my goal...lol
 
#13
Since all steelhead are sitting ducks in that soft inside on the open gravel bars anyways, I would kindly suggest for everyone's safety that no one attempt to fish anything else. Please and thank you!