Pontoon boat anchors: Your experience with.

Discussion in 'Watercraft' started by scottr, May 27, 2007.

  1. Dale Dennis

    Dale Dennis Formally Double-D

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    I will second that,
    if you don't want to swamp your pontoon and lose your gear and possibly your life you should never anchor it, even moderately fast moving water and dragging a chain will certainly get you into trouble. Use it to anchor on the beach.
     
  2. Kent Lufkin

    Kent Lufkin Remember when you could remember everything?

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    In a lake.

    K
     
  3. gt

    gt Active Member

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    chain anchor construction: go to west marine or similar place; purchase 12' of the biggest diameter chain they offer; purchase about 12" of stainless cable and some swagging connectors; put the stainless cable through the chain, i used about 10 link loops; swag the loop of stainless closed; done.

    i never anchor in moving water. pull over drop the chain so the boat does not leave the scene and fish on foot. water too deep? move along to someplace you can do the above. lakes, drop the chain and fish away. that chain anchor is good up until the wind tops 30mph, then its going to start dragging!
     
  4. Preston

    Preston Active Member

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    My chain anchor is made from the longest eyebolt I could find. A pair of old tire chains (purchased at a second-hand store) and one side of a pair of truck chains found along the roadside were looped onto the eyebolt and secured with a large washer and a locknut. My anchor rope has a steel thimble spliced into the end of it and I attach the anchor with a screw-lock link. It's quite compact and weighs 35-45 pounds depending on how much of the chain I choose to use. With a 12 1/2-foot raft, 35 pounds is adequate at under 2000cfs in the canyon, anything over that requires somewhat more; it all depends on how much you enjoy hoisting it off the bottom. As I grow older and less fit, I sometimes think about using a doubled-rope-and-pulley system.
     
  5. scottr

    scottr Active Member

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    So I made my chain anchor last night. I used 14' of 5/8" galvanized chain (= 1lb per foot) strung though a 5/8" u-bolt (for a 2 1/2" dia. pipe). This gives me roughly a 15lb anchor.

    I used a continuous length of chain and folded it over into 12" sections. I threaded the u-bolt through the top of all the links and then placed the bracket and nuts on. I added extra nuts just to add insurance in-case they back off and will attach to the rope with a anchor bracket through the u of the u-bolt

    BTW this is a lake,shore, and frog water anchor as it cost me about 35 bucks to make and I don't want to donate it to the bottom like my last one
     
  6. riseform

    riseform Active Member

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    Good job...you'll have to see if it's heavy enough for the summer flows. Mine is a bit heavier than that and it still tries to scare me and pull away from the shallows sometimes.
     
  7. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    The above sums it up nicely; not much I could add. Vis a vis anchors, see if you can find an old rubber inner-tube. Cut off a long section, punch holes in one end and thread through some 1/4" Dacron line to close one end. Three/four holes in the top and loop your anchor line through these (you want a straight line coming off the tubing - think 'sea anchor.')

    Fill with rocks at the beach, pull top closed and there you go. End of trip dump out rocks ... and off you go.

    Fred
     
  8. scottr

    scottr Active Member

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    Fred do use this like a drift sock or as a easy to transport anchor used to secure your boat when beaching on a river or holding stationary in a lake?

    My boat came with a similar anchor bag (to be filled with rocks found at waterside) but it does not seen to hold enough weight to secure my boat to the shore on a river with out pulling most of the boat out of the water defeating the purpose on an anchor to start.
     
  9. speyfisher

    speyfisher Active Member

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    The best use of an anchor for either a pontoon or a drift boat is to back row in towards shore, when you get close, drop the anchor, let out a little rope, and cinch her up. Letting the current swing the boat in towards shore. This will hold the boat long enough for you to get out and do whatever you have to do to make sure the boat will stay put while you fish. Anything more than that, you are asking for trouble.
     
  10. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh, I forgot one thing about anchoring with a pontoon boat. If you're having alot of problem with the boat swaying in the current, there is an easy solution that usually works. Leave an oar down and in the water, usually the oar that's sitting out in the current (ie. the one that's not closest to the bank usually). This will act as a keel somewhat and keep the boat to a minimum sway. You want that oar in the oarlock and blade down into the current. Best to just have the one down. Kind of counteracts the sway. You can also use a driftsock out in front of the boat. But a SERIOUS warning about doing this. If you don't plan to catch any fish, you're gold. If you hook into one, you'll be wishing it wasn't out there. Especially since you'll usually be fishing out and down from your boat (and into the direction of that drift sock). Hook and fish and you not only have to worry about the anchor rope behind you, but the drift sock (and rope) in front of you (it's much easier in a pontoon to get out from one rope then front and back). No worries about the oar being in your way if it's in the water. Just an oarstroke back if you have a fish on will remedy any wrapping you may have.
     
  11. Jerry Daschofsky

    Jerry Daschofsky Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh yeah, don't think anyone spoke about what a rocker hull is. It's basically a full curve of the tubes (though you do have some semi rocker who have a very small flat line and then a sharp rise like some of the ODC's). Best way to figure out what you have is to put your fully inflated boat on the flat garage floor. Lift your feet up into the foot holds and see if you can rock back and forth. My steelheader will sit evenly, even if I stand up and walk on the tubes (and that goes for in the river as well).
     
  12. DirtFish

    DirtFish New Member

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    btw, if you are ever looking for cheap chain again, try Washington Chain over in Seattle for some used or remnant chain. 206-623-8500. www.wachain.com. I got 50 lbs for $25. Nice deal if you don't mind driving down to the industrial zone south of Safeco field.
     
  13. fredaevans

    fredaevans Active Member

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    Sorry Scot, almost missed your question. I'm "no expert" by any stretch vis a vis 'Toons,' but if the rock bag won't hold it's either too small (volume/wt) for the boat or you're trying to anchor in too fast of water. The 'rock sack' is used as a normal anchor, not a 'drogue.'

    Fred